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Conservation Update: Sportsmen Stress Importance of Living Within Our Environmental Means

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May 30, 2012

Conservation Update: Sportsmen Stress Importance of Living Within Our Environmental Means

By Bob Marshall

"Living within our means" is a phrase and idea that no one has been able to escape during the last few years, as the economy tanked and the national debt climbed. The phrase has become the political battle cry du jour, one few would disagree with.

Unfortunately, the same sense of prudence hasn't been as popular among politicians when it comes to the environment. Many instead favor over-spending public lands and waters, a risky policy that has much of the nation's remaining premiere fish and wildlife habitat on the edge of debasement.

Two perfect examples were highlighted this spring in the Western press. "Sucking the River Dry" in the Denver Post chronicles more troubles for the long-abused Colorado River. "We don't have fish and wildlife by accident" in the Casper Star-Tribune tells how fish, wildlife, sportsmen and the state's economy are jeopardized by efforts to repeal roadless and wilderness rules.

Both are worth reading for sportsmen who care about what we will be leaving to the next generation.

Comments (5)

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from Sayfu wrote 1 year 46 weeks ago

I'd tend to want the federal govt to create a budget, and live within their means, so we do not have to borrow an incredible amount of money, and adversely effect conservation programs for decades to come. Right now 40 cents one every dollar spent goes to pay the intrest on our massive debt, $5 trillion in just the last 3.5 years! Money that could have been spent on conservation programs had they their spending, and reduced waste of money in order.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from hermit crab wrote 1 year 46 weeks ago

Bob Marshall:
"Both are worth reading for sportsmen who care about what we will be leaving to the next generation."

Spot on! That's what this is all about. And yes, I read them.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from labrador12 wrote 1 year 46 weeks ago

It is amazing to me that Conservation writers never do stories on the amazing recovery of fisheries in former "dead" lakes and rivers. Joe Cemerle wrote about the "insane number of football shaped smallmouths" last week I believe. He was fishing in Lake Erie, in the City of Buffalo NY, the former home of Hooker Chemical amoung other entities. How come no mention of the recovery of resources? I believe in living within our means. Do you know the difference between pristine and high quality? Does a state with a whitetail kill of over 200,000 animals qualify as premiere habitat?

-1 Good Comment? | | Report
from wisc14 wrote 1 year 46 weeks ago

labrador: no not really. whitetail deer can live anywhere. we have them running through downtown areas all the time in wi

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Mike Diehl wrote 1 year 45 weeks ago

"How come no mention of the recovery of resources?"

Probably because the extent of devastation is vastly greater than the extent or degree of recovery. About those lake Erie bass. According to the EPA they are unsafe to eat more frequently than once per month. In contrast, 150 years ago you could eat them three times a day safely. So no, Lake Erie waters have not "recovered." They're merely very toxic to aquatic species, rather than horrendously lethal, as they have been.

It takes centuries to undo the damage to a watershed by industrial pollution. It takes millions of years to undo the damage of an open pit mine. The best CURE is to force industries to avoid polluting and to mitigate ALL the damage cause by open pit mines.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report

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from hermit crab wrote 1 year 46 weeks ago

Bob Marshall:
"Both are worth reading for sportsmen who care about what we will be leaving to the next generation."

Spot on! That's what this is all about. And yes, I read them.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from wisc14 wrote 1 year 46 weeks ago

labrador: no not really. whitetail deer can live anywhere. we have them running through downtown areas all the time in wi

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Mike Diehl wrote 1 year 45 weeks ago

"How come no mention of the recovery of resources?"

Probably because the extent of devastation is vastly greater than the extent or degree of recovery. About those lake Erie bass. According to the EPA they are unsafe to eat more frequently than once per month. In contrast, 150 years ago you could eat them three times a day safely. So no, Lake Erie waters have not "recovered." They're merely very toxic to aquatic species, rather than horrendously lethal, as they have been.

It takes centuries to undo the damage to a watershed by industrial pollution. It takes millions of years to undo the damage of an open pit mine. The best CURE is to force industries to avoid polluting and to mitigate ALL the damage cause by open pit mines.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Sayfu wrote 1 year 46 weeks ago

I'd tend to want the federal govt to create a budget, and live within their means, so we do not have to borrow an incredible amount of money, and adversely effect conservation programs for decades to come. Right now 40 cents one every dollar spent goes to pay the intrest on our massive debt, $5 trillion in just the last 3.5 years! Money that could have been spent on conservation programs had they their spending, and reduced waste of money in order.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from labrador12 wrote 1 year 46 weeks ago

It is amazing to me that Conservation writers never do stories on the amazing recovery of fisheries in former "dead" lakes and rivers. Joe Cemerle wrote about the "insane number of football shaped smallmouths" last week I believe. He was fishing in Lake Erie, in the City of Buffalo NY, the former home of Hooker Chemical amoung other entities. How come no mention of the recovery of resources? I believe in living within our means. Do you know the difference between pristine and high quality? Does a state with a whitetail kill of over 200,000 animals qualify as premiere habitat?

-1 Good Comment? | | Report

Post a Comment

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