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104-Pound Missouri 'Coyote' Determined To Be A Wolf

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April 06, 2011

104-Pound Missouri 'Coyote' Determined To Be A Wolf

By Chad Love

First it was mountain lions now comes word that a 104-pound "coyote" shot in Missouri back in November is actually a wild wolf, according to DNA analysis.

From this story in the Wichita (Kan) Eagle:
"... after about 4 1/2 months the Missouri Department of Conservation has officially identified a 104-pound wild canine as a wolf after the second round of DNA testing. After the first round they announced the big animal shot opening weekend of the Missouri deer season was a coyote. The announcement drew howls of laughter from even those with only a little background in the outdoors. Coyotes very rarely exceed 40 pounds in the midwest.

"...Apparently the first round of testing compared the animal’s DNA to that of Rocky Mountain wolves. It appears to be of the type that have thrived in the Great Lakes for years."

So what's up with Missouri? Is it the new Montana? Are grizzlies next?

Comments (38)

Top Rated
All Comments
from ilikehunting wrote 3 years 1 week ago

You joke about grizzlies but we have black bears all over the southern part of the state. In a few years we will have a black bear season. We also just re-introduced elk to the state. Weird stuff.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from db270 wrote 3 years 1 week ago

I'm lucky to live in a state with such animal diversity! Go MO!

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from ALJoe wrote 3 years 1 week ago

Surprised that your DNR admitted to it being a wolf. In my home state there has been repeated sightings, pictures, and even a kill of mountain lions. The state DNR still puts out the statement every year that there is no provable evidence of mountain lions. This may start a debate, do you feel like a state DNR would purposely try to cover up the existence of cetrain animals in certain areas, and why?

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Walt Smith wrote 3 years 1 week ago

It looks like the plan to re-introduce wolved in every state is working! Good ridance!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from GiantWhitetails wrote 3 years 1 week ago

great! now i got wolves along with catamounts to worry about when im walkin at night! i have seen some large canine tracks but those couldve just be dogs. Missouri is pretty awesome. i wonder when field and stream will do an article on elk being reintroduced in MO.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from Beekeeper wrote 3 years 1 week ago

Interesting...

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from jbird wrote 3 years 1 week ago

Being a MO resident, I'm not real suprised. My Grandpa saw a wolf while we were deer hunting about 25 years ago. Always knew there were a few around, just like mountain lions. Love that elk are being re-introduced to the state!

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Moose1980 wrote 3 years 1 week ago

ALJoe, they admitted it's a wolf, but they sure stalled. They had to send it for DNA testing? Gee I wonder what gave it away, 104 lbs? Long lanky WOLF-like legs? Much more robust, strong jaw? And they compared the DNA to rocky Mountain gray wolves instead of the much closer population of the Great Lakes variety. They certainly tried every trick in the book to delay. I'm sure the 1st biologist to see it knew what it was, but had to drag it out.

+5 Good Comment? | | Report
from fordman155 wrote 3 years 1 week ago

I wonder how many of them thought it was a wolf before testing the DNA? The Kansas Parks and Wildlife won't admit there are wolves here but I think I've seen them. I came close to shooting at the two huge dog-like animals I saw two I saw but couldn't get the rifle out quick enough. On a related note, Kansas PW says there is only a transient mountain lion population here. They're breeding here. I think that makes them permanent, right?

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from baconboy206 wrote 3 years 1 week ago

that thing must have walked a looong ways. Im almost a little bit curious if it was a pet that got to big and got "released" into the wild

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from gautrey wrote 3 years 1 week ago

It doesn`t even look like a coyote!

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from iron giant wrote 3 years 1 week ago

So would these isolated wolves be hold outs of the wolf population that was there before they got hunted to "Extinction" in the area, or pets that got loose/were released, or maybe one that is really lost from Canada or the Yellowstone area?

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Clay Cooper wrote 3 years 1 week ago

Coyote?

Wolf?

I could have told you it was a Wolf just by looking at the picture. LOL!

Wonder if the shooter is in trouble for shooting it??

Couple of years ago, a fella with Indian Guide shot what both truly thought was a Polar Bear. After DNA testing, the Bear was a cross between Grizz and Polar and pressure was on to prosecute the shooter! The Hunter didn't have a tag for Grizzly

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from jakenbake wrote 3 years 1 week ago

Where there is a vacuum, nature will fill it. When there is a lack of top-rung predators, wandering top-rung predators will fill the void, so long as we humans aren't hunting the hunters. I'd expect things like this to happen more frequently as time goes on.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from shane wrote 3 years 1 week ago

Did the hunters still think it was a coyote after they picked it up?

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Nebraskahunter18 wrote 3 years 1 week ago

I was driving back from deer hunting here in nebraska and we saw what looked like a hybrid. It had the face of a coyote the blackness of the back of a wolf and legs of a coyote and big body.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from rock rat wrote 3 years 1 week ago

Well if anyone else sees and big song doggies please shoot them.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from JOHN ANDERSON wrote 3 years 1 week ago

Dont know who looks more suprised the hunter or the wolf.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Clay Cooper wrote 3 years 1 week ago

BY'GOLLY!

This may explain the vanishing of goats in the area, I’ll bet this Fella has a wall full of trophy deer (Goats)!

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from fliphuntr14 wrote 3 years 1 week ago

How much do wolves weigh on average? i've seen the hied from a wolf in person and other pictures it looks small as those go but no way in hell is that a coyote. Did this guy get in trouble for shooting it?

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from babsfish4life wrote 3 years 1 week ago

If they really compared the "Rocky Mountain Wolf" DNA to this wolf they are stupid. The Rocky Mountain Wolf is now extinct, they were finished off by the Canadian Timber Wolf when they were introduced into the Yellowstone area. Did they compare the DNA to a Mammoth too?

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from MaxPower wrote 3 years 1 week ago

Wolves weigh about 70-100 lbs when full grown, just a tad bigger than a coyote. I've heard stories of them reaching 120-130 lbs, but again those are stories.

-1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Michael Jager wrote 3 years 1 week ago

What is the difference between Rocky mountain wolves, Great Lakes wolves and Canadian Timber wolves?

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from ChandlerV1997 wrote 3 years 1 week ago

My dad has told me about how he used to see black panthers when he was a kid, in Kansas!

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from baconboy206 wrote 3 years 1 week ago

120-130 isnt at all uncommon for wolves in the north, where i am in the interior of bc we regularly shoot wolves over 120, sometimes one will hit 150. The biggest i ever heard of was 180. Most of these dont go into boone and crocket or anything, most are shot by ranchers or trappers and are then skinned and sold by both

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Moose1980 wrote 3 years 1 week ago

mfjager,
There are slight molecular differences. The biggest differences are behavioral based on the types of habitat they occupy, diet and territory ranges. They are all classified as the same species Canis lupus. Some researchers have several different subspecies for them, others not so much. Taxonomy and systematics is very fluid and can change often. Even your friendly lab is now classified as Canis lupus familiaris, no longer believed to be a distint species.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from jamesti wrote 3 years 1 week ago

even for a wolf, that's pretty good sized.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Derrit wrote 3 years 1 week ago

wonder which of the two it tasted like-

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Ga hunter wrote 3 years 6 days ago

Thats a very nice lookin wolf or coyote or whatever its supposed to be!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Kyle VanBritson wrote 3 years 5 days ago

I swear as a kid a number of years ago, I know I saw a Mountain Lion here in Cynthiana, Indiana. Now we have proof that there are mountain lions in the state of Indiana, but it makes me wonder, how long have they been here, and was that really a mountain lion, or did my 10 year old mind blow something else outta proportion, but I'm pretty sure it was a mountain lion.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from aferraro wrote 3 years 5 days ago

It's kind of funny that the wildlife "scientists" need DNA testing to know the difference between a wolf and a coyote? The fact that it's 104 pounds and looks like a wolf would be good clues. These the same people who manage our game lands- wonderful..

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from deerhunterrick wrote 2 years 50 weeks ago

We have 70/80# coyote shot here in Ohio/Mich every year. Can't prove they do, but I believe they cross breed on a regular basis.Seeing more and more animals showing up in areas they deny they exist. Funny how they show up after being denied until getting shot. Just had this decussion with another F&S memebr last week about cougars in southwestern Michigan/Indiana and NW Ohio, imagine that

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Nathan Ryver wrote 1 year 23 weeks ago

Looks like El Chupacabra

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from voiceofreasoncny wrote 1 year 4 weeks ago

State Game Departments are usually not in any hurry to admit to the existence of endangered/threatened species within their borders because that renders them liable for coming up with a recovery/management plan that further stretches already limited resources.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from mcsexy3 wrote 23 weeks 21 hours ago

Missouri is where it's at! Some of my best hunting, you just have to know where to go.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from phantomfly wrote 6 weeks 5 days ago

Coywolf. They are all over the place. Check out PBS

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from phantomfly wrote 6 weeks 5 days ago

Coywolf. They are all over the place. Check out PBS

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from smitty6398 wrote 3 weeks 6 days ago

Re: Pet wolves released/escaped into the wild. In the 80's, I ran a repair shop, had a customer who "Rehabbed" wolves for release back into nature. He also bred the ones unsalvagable, with the pups given up for release. He said "Wolves do not become Pets, they just tolerate people who serve their needs". He had been attacked several times, usually by Alpha males during mating season; and several times by Alpha females with pups. Never sustained a serious injury, many stitches though.

0 Good Comment? | | Report

Post a Comment

from Moose1980 wrote 3 years 1 week ago

ALJoe, they admitted it's a wolf, but they sure stalled. They had to send it for DNA testing? Gee I wonder what gave it away, 104 lbs? Long lanky WOLF-like legs? Much more robust, strong jaw? And they compared the DNA to rocky Mountain gray wolves instead of the much closer population of the Great Lakes variety. They certainly tried every trick in the book to delay. I'm sure the 1st biologist to see it knew what it was, but had to drag it out.

+5 Good Comment? | | Report
from db270 wrote 3 years 1 week ago

I'm lucky to live in a state with such animal diversity! Go MO!

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from GiantWhitetails wrote 3 years 1 week ago

great! now i got wolves along with catamounts to worry about when im walkin at night! i have seen some large canine tracks but those couldve just be dogs. Missouri is pretty awesome. i wonder when field and stream will do an article on elk being reintroduced in MO.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from baconboy206 wrote 3 years 1 week ago

that thing must have walked a looong ways. Im almost a little bit curious if it was a pet that got to big and got "released" into the wild

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from jakenbake wrote 3 years 1 week ago

Where there is a vacuum, nature will fill it. When there is a lack of top-rung predators, wandering top-rung predators will fill the void, so long as we humans aren't hunting the hunters. I'd expect things like this to happen more frequently as time goes on.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from ilikehunting wrote 3 years 1 week ago

You joke about grizzlies but we have black bears all over the southern part of the state. In a few years we will have a black bear season. We also just re-introduced elk to the state. Weird stuff.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from ALJoe wrote 3 years 1 week ago

Surprised that your DNR admitted to it being a wolf. In my home state there has been repeated sightings, pictures, and even a kill of mountain lions. The state DNR still puts out the statement every year that there is no provable evidence of mountain lions. This may start a debate, do you feel like a state DNR would purposely try to cover up the existence of cetrain animals in certain areas, and why?

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Beekeeper wrote 3 years 1 week ago

Interesting...

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from jbird wrote 3 years 1 week ago

Being a MO resident, I'm not real suprised. My Grandpa saw a wolf while we were deer hunting about 25 years ago. Always knew there were a few around, just like mountain lions. Love that elk are being re-introduced to the state!

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from gautrey wrote 3 years 1 week ago

It doesn`t even look like a coyote!

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from babsfish4life wrote 3 years 1 week ago

If they really compared the "Rocky Mountain Wolf" DNA to this wolf they are stupid. The Rocky Mountain Wolf is now extinct, they were finished off by the Canadian Timber Wolf when they were introduced into the Yellowstone area. Did they compare the DNA to a Mammoth too?

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Moose1980 wrote 3 years 1 week ago

mfjager,
There are slight molecular differences. The biggest differences are behavioral based on the types of habitat they occupy, diet and territory ranges. They are all classified as the same species Canis lupus. Some researchers have several different subspecies for them, others not so much. Taxonomy and systematics is very fluid and can change often. Even your friendly lab is now classified as Canis lupus familiaris, no longer believed to be a distint species.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from fordman155 wrote 3 years 1 week ago

I wonder how many of them thought it was a wolf before testing the DNA? The Kansas Parks and Wildlife won't admit there are wolves here but I think I've seen them. I came close to shooting at the two huge dog-like animals I saw two I saw but couldn't get the rifle out quick enough. On a related note, Kansas PW says there is only a transient mountain lion population here. They're breeding here. I think that makes them permanent, right?

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from iron giant wrote 3 years 1 week ago

So would these isolated wolves be hold outs of the wolf population that was there before they got hunted to "Extinction" in the area, or pets that got loose/were released, or maybe one that is really lost from Canada or the Yellowstone area?

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Clay Cooper wrote 3 years 1 week ago

Coyote?

Wolf?

I could have told you it was a Wolf just by looking at the picture. LOL!

Wonder if the shooter is in trouble for shooting it??

Couple of years ago, a fella with Indian Guide shot what both truly thought was a Polar Bear. After DNA testing, the Bear was a cross between Grizz and Polar and pressure was on to prosecute the shooter! The Hunter didn't have a tag for Grizzly

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from shane wrote 3 years 1 week ago

Did the hunters still think it was a coyote after they picked it up?

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Nebraskahunter18 wrote 3 years 1 week ago

I was driving back from deer hunting here in nebraska and we saw what looked like a hybrid. It had the face of a coyote the blackness of the back of a wolf and legs of a coyote and big body.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from rock rat wrote 3 years 1 week ago

Well if anyone else sees and big song doggies please shoot them.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from JOHN ANDERSON wrote 3 years 1 week ago

Dont know who looks more suprised the hunter or the wolf.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Clay Cooper wrote 3 years 1 week ago

BY'GOLLY!

This may explain the vanishing of goats in the area, I’ll bet this Fella has a wall full of trophy deer (Goats)!

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from fliphuntr14 wrote 3 years 1 week ago

How much do wolves weigh on average? i've seen the hied from a wolf in person and other pictures it looks small as those go but no way in hell is that a coyote. Did this guy get in trouble for shooting it?

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from ChandlerV1997 wrote 3 years 1 week ago

My dad has told me about how he used to see black panthers when he was a kid, in Kansas!

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from baconboy206 wrote 3 years 1 week ago

120-130 isnt at all uncommon for wolves in the north, where i am in the interior of bc we regularly shoot wolves over 120, sometimes one will hit 150. The biggest i ever heard of was 180. Most of these dont go into boone and crocket or anything, most are shot by ranchers or trappers and are then skinned and sold by both

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from jamesti wrote 3 years 1 week ago

even for a wolf, that's pretty good sized.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Walt Smith wrote 3 years 1 week ago

It looks like the plan to re-introduce wolved in every state is working! Good ridance!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Michael Jager wrote 3 years 1 week ago

What is the difference between Rocky mountain wolves, Great Lakes wolves and Canadian Timber wolves?

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Derrit wrote 3 years 1 week ago

wonder which of the two it tasted like-

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Ga hunter wrote 3 years 6 days ago

Thats a very nice lookin wolf or coyote or whatever its supposed to be!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Kyle VanBritson wrote 3 years 5 days ago

I swear as a kid a number of years ago, I know I saw a Mountain Lion here in Cynthiana, Indiana. Now we have proof that there are mountain lions in the state of Indiana, but it makes me wonder, how long have they been here, and was that really a mountain lion, or did my 10 year old mind blow something else outta proportion, but I'm pretty sure it was a mountain lion.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from aferraro wrote 3 years 5 days ago

It's kind of funny that the wildlife "scientists" need DNA testing to know the difference between a wolf and a coyote? The fact that it's 104 pounds and looks like a wolf would be good clues. These the same people who manage our game lands- wonderful..

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from deerhunterrick wrote 2 years 50 weeks ago

We have 70/80# coyote shot here in Ohio/Mich every year. Can't prove they do, but I believe they cross breed on a regular basis.Seeing more and more animals showing up in areas they deny they exist. Funny how they show up after being denied until getting shot. Just had this decussion with another F&S memebr last week about cougars in southwestern Michigan/Indiana and NW Ohio, imagine that

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Nathan Ryver wrote 1 year 23 weeks ago

Looks like El Chupacabra

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from voiceofreasoncny wrote 1 year 4 weeks ago

State Game Departments are usually not in any hurry to admit to the existence of endangered/threatened species within their borders because that renders them liable for coming up with a recovery/management plan that further stretches already limited resources.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from mcsexy3 wrote 23 weeks 21 hours ago

Missouri is where it's at! Some of my best hunting, you just have to know where to go.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from phantomfly wrote 6 weeks 5 days ago

Coywolf. They are all over the place. Check out PBS

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from phantomfly wrote 6 weeks 5 days ago

Coywolf. They are all over the place. Check out PBS

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from smitty6398 wrote 3 weeks 6 days ago

Re: Pet wolves released/escaped into the wild. In the 80's, I ran a repair shop, had a customer who "Rehabbed" wolves for release back into nature. He also bred the ones unsalvagable, with the pups given up for release. He said "Wolves do not become Pets, they just tolerate people who serve their needs". He had been attacked several times, usually by Alpha males during mating season; and several times by Alpha females with pups. Never sustained a serious injury, many stitches though.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from MaxPower wrote 3 years 1 week ago

Wolves weigh about 70-100 lbs when full grown, just a tad bigger than a coyote. I've heard stories of them reaching 120-130 lbs, but again those are stories.

-1 Good Comment? | | Report

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