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Program Uses Trophy Hunting as Key To Rural Development in Zimbabwe

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June 30, 2011

Program Uses Trophy Hunting as Key To Rural Development in Zimbabwe

By Chad Love

A UN-backed program to help rural economic development in impoverished regions of Zimbabwe uses trophy hunting as a key part of its strategy.

From this story on irinnews.org:
The mostly dry Chiredzi district in southeastern Zimbabwe will grow drier as rainfall becomes increasingly uncertain, but trophy hunting and rearing crocodiles for their meat and skins can become major money earners to help rural households overcome poverty while adapting to climate change. In one of several initiatives under a project backed by the UN and government, elephants, warthogs, giraffes, buffaloes and impala - a type of antelope - are kept in an area measuring about 7,000 square kilometres and sold to trophy hunters licensed by the government in cooperation with the district authorities, while the community gets free meat from the slain animals.

"The project is now well established and the beneficiaries are building a school and a clinic from the money they receive from the sale of the animals," said Leonard Unganyi, who manages the project run jointly by the UN Development Programme (UNDP) and the government-controlled Environment Management Agency (EMA). "They have also bought a truck and set up a grain-grinding mill to benefit the community." He said the project, which helps communities cope with drought and climate change, would be replicated in other parts of the country because 90 percent of Zimbabwean farmers depend on rain-fed agriculture and are struggling to become food secure.

Thoughts? Is it surprising to see such programs get favorable press?

Comments (3)

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from Moose1980 wrote 2 years 41 weeks ago

A lot of countries in Africa depend on trophy hunting. A lot of money and a lot of meat goes back to the people. I think a lot of the general public is just ignorant on what hunting is truly about, so any favorable press is good.

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from shane wrote 2 years 41 weeks ago

Favorable...kinda. The wording is not so hot. You don't buy an animal. You buy a permit that allows you to hunt one. Slain? Are there dragons?

The sense I get is that they are monetarily benefiting from our barbarianism, so they shall accept our barbarian ways for now.

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from ggmack wrote 2 years 41 weeks ago

yeah the wording and tone are a bit bothersome, makes it sound like since the rain is gone the only option to to pen up the animals and let people shoot them, but to get good press is a good thing.

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from ggmack wrote 2 years 41 weeks ago

yeah the wording and tone are a bit bothersome, makes it sound like since the rain is gone the only option to to pen up the animals and let people shoot them, but to get good press is a good thing.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Moose1980 wrote 2 years 41 weeks ago

A lot of countries in Africa depend on trophy hunting. A lot of money and a lot of meat goes back to the people. I think a lot of the general public is just ignorant on what hunting is truly about, so any favorable press is good.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from shane wrote 2 years 41 weeks ago

Favorable...kinda. The wording is not so hot. You don't buy an animal. You buy a permit that allows you to hunt one. Slain? Are there dragons?

The sense I get is that they are monetarily benefiting from our barbarianism, so they shall accept our barbarian ways for now.

0 Good Comment? | | Report

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