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Special NJ Nighttime Coyote Hunt Starts Next Monday

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December 29, 2011

Special NJ Nighttime Coyote Hunt Starts Next Monday

By Chad Love

Hot on the heels of New jersey's contentious, litigious and largely successful bear season comes the Garden State's first special nighttime coyote hunt.

From this story on newjerseynewsroom.com:

First it was the black bears, now it’s coyotes. Beginning next Monday, New Jersey will permit hunters to shoot the wolves on the spot for a special hunting season. The New Jersey Division of Fish and Wildlife estimates more than five thousand coyotes are running wild around in the Garden State. Biologist Andrew Burnett says they usually prey on rodents and rabbits, but can easily attack small pets, alarming many residents and pet owners.

“There have been incidences of coyotes trying to take small dogs while their owners are walking them on a leash. Cats are usually always at risk. It’s not that the coyote will actively go out and seek these animals. However, should they encounter one they wouldn’t necessarily turn it down”, warns Burnett in an interview with Newark-based radio station website, WBGO.org.

Wildlife experts say it may be difficult to hunt coyotes because they are generally wary of humans and run away quickly when spotted. Hunters in the Garden State have been allowed to use rifles to shoot coyotes during daylight since November. Now, the special permit will allow hunters to shoot the animals at night. Coyote hunting season will continue until mid March.

Bears, coyotes, what's next, mountain lions? What's with all the megafauna in the land of Tony Soprana and industrial parks? Is New Jersey the next Montana?

Comments (9)

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from Koldkut wrote 2 years 16 weeks ago

The best time is to wait two weeks for the moon to shed enough light that you don't need any artificial light. Coyotes at night are not shy at all, sometimes you can shoot one out of a group and they don't run off like they would in the daylight hours.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from steve182 wrote 2 years 16 weeks ago

Because of development and regulations, there are lots of little unhuntable pockets in suburban NJ. Down i n South Jersey where i am there are vast miles of unbroken woods and miles upon miles of open grassland marsh where any kind of wildlife can thrive and live to old age because of the access difficulty. Coyotes are anything but rare, though sightings are not terribly common, scat and carcasses tell me coyotes are common where i hunt.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from steve182 wrote 2 years 16 weeks ago

Not all of NJ is like you see on television. we have lots of agriculture in the central and southern portion, as well as miles and mies of unbroken forrest and vast miles of open grassland marsh where any and all kinds of wildlife thrive. Access is limited and or difficult. In the urban and suburban north, unhuntable pockets hold lots of wildlife too.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Levi Banks wrote 2 years 16 weeks ago

I guess you shouldn't expect much more from a Jersey journalist, but are they hunting wolves or coyotes?

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from dneaster3 wrote 2 years 16 weeks ago

"shoot the wolves on the spot"
"Cats are usually always at risk"
Is anyone editing articles anymore? Apparently not.

Good luck NJ hunters. Take out as many of the yodel-dogs as you can!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Stinkypants wrote 2 years 15 weeks ago

i hunt west central jersey and see coyotes every year, but find coyote sign about everytime i walk around the farm. ive seen them chasing fawns while scouting early season, watched them carrying groundhogs and rabbits from across fields, and see piles of scat with bunny fur everywhere. damn thingas are a menace. theres more to jersey than oil refineries near the turnpike.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from steve182 wrote 2 years 15 weeks ago

I bought a tag. Don't know if i'll do any night hunting, but i'll be in a tree bowhunting this month.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from 2Poppa wrote 2 years 15 weeks ago

I think New Jersey may be ahead of most states with their forward thinking in allowing night time hunts, when most coyotes are out.

When I shoot one I always open the stomach to check the contents and I'm always surprised.

One particular coyote I shot, had a whole squirrel and rabbit with their fur completely off,(I can't imagine how the 'yote managed that) a ball of fur and feathers intertwined together about the size of a softball, a whole mole with his fur intact and the backbone of a turkey.

Ishot the coyote after he stumbled into a group of forty three turkey's that I had been watching for almost an hour while huntin' deer. They all clambored for the tree tops for safety as I watched the yote rubber necking, looking to the tree tops. He was less than 20-feet from me as he turned his head to stay on the trail.

For some unknown reason a lone turkey, which I hadn't noticed, nor the predator, stayed on the ground. Just as the coyote turned his head to continue on his path he bumped into the straggler which caught everyone by surprise.

Have you ever seen a full grown Tom Turkey beat a coyote with his wings?
The turkey was already facing the 'yote and began to flap his wings at a high rate of speed, and in doing so, began to gain elevation. I couldn't believe the volume of sound coming from the turkeys wings. At every flap, the 'yote would turn his head as if he was dodging a heavyweight boxers blow.

After several good wing flaps with lift, the turkey turned and pointed his head in the direction of freedom and tried to tuck his legs and feet under his body.

With one great leap from the predator,(by now I had the safety off of the 7mm Mag)I pulled the trigger and shot him dead from the hip, which flipped the 'yote in the air.

It happened so quick, with the turkey landing somehow in a sappling less than six feet off the ground. He seemed to be thanking me and stayed there the whole time I inspected the stomach contents.

Kudos for New Jersey!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Nyflyangler wrote 2 years 15 weeks ago

The newjerseynewsroom.com actually calls the prairie wolves, which isn't a bad definition.

What I'm really interested in is a season that would allow me to shoot New Jerseyians. Especially the guy who threw a fit because I parked in front of his house when I visited my friends cross the street from him.

0 Good Comment? | | Report

Post a Comment

from Koldkut wrote 2 years 16 weeks ago

The best time is to wait two weeks for the moon to shed enough light that you don't need any artificial light. Coyotes at night are not shy at all, sometimes you can shoot one out of a group and they don't run off like they would in the daylight hours.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from steve182 wrote 2 years 16 weeks ago

Because of development and regulations, there are lots of little unhuntable pockets in suburban NJ. Down i n South Jersey where i am there are vast miles of unbroken woods and miles upon miles of open grassland marsh where any kind of wildlife can thrive and live to old age because of the access difficulty. Coyotes are anything but rare, though sightings are not terribly common, scat and carcasses tell me coyotes are common where i hunt.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from steve182 wrote 2 years 16 weeks ago

Not all of NJ is like you see on television. we have lots of agriculture in the central and southern portion, as well as miles and mies of unbroken forrest and vast miles of open grassland marsh where any and all kinds of wildlife thrive. Access is limited and or difficult. In the urban and suburban north, unhuntable pockets hold lots of wildlife too.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Levi Banks wrote 2 years 16 weeks ago

I guess you shouldn't expect much more from a Jersey journalist, but are they hunting wolves or coyotes?

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from dneaster3 wrote 2 years 16 weeks ago

"shoot the wolves on the spot"
"Cats are usually always at risk"
Is anyone editing articles anymore? Apparently not.

Good luck NJ hunters. Take out as many of the yodel-dogs as you can!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Stinkypants wrote 2 years 15 weeks ago

i hunt west central jersey and see coyotes every year, but find coyote sign about everytime i walk around the farm. ive seen them chasing fawns while scouting early season, watched them carrying groundhogs and rabbits from across fields, and see piles of scat with bunny fur everywhere. damn thingas are a menace. theres more to jersey than oil refineries near the turnpike.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from steve182 wrote 2 years 15 weeks ago

I bought a tag. Don't know if i'll do any night hunting, but i'll be in a tree bowhunting this month.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from 2Poppa wrote 2 years 15 weeks ago

I think New Jersey may be ahead of most states with their forward thinking in allowing night time hunts, when most coyotes are out.

When I shoot one I always open the stomach to check the contents and I'm always surprised.

One particular coyote I shot, had a whole squirrel and rabbit with their fur completely off,(I can't imagine how the 'yote managed that) a ball of fur and feathers intertwined together about the size of a softball, a whole mole with his fur intact and the backbone of a turkey.

Ishot the coyote after he stumbled into a group of forty three turkey's that I had been watching for almost an hour while huntin' deer. They all clambored for the tree tops for safety as I watched the yote rubber necking, looking to the tree tops. He was less than 20-feet from me as he turned his head to stay on the trail.

For some unknown reason a lone turkey, which I hadn't noticed, nor the predator, stayed on the ground. Just as the coyote turned his head to continue on his path he bumped into the straggler which caught everyone by surprise.

Have you ever seen a full grown Tom Turkey beat a coyote with his wings?
The turkey was already facing the 'yote and began to flap his wings at a high rate of speed, and in doing so, began to gain elevation. I couldn't believe the volume of sound coming from the turkeys wings. At every flap, the 'yote would turn his head as if he was dodging a heavyweight boxers blow.

After several good wing flaps with lift, the turkey turned and pointed his head in the direction of freedom and tried to tuck his legs and feet under his body.

With one great leap from the predator,(by now I had the safety off of the 7mm Mag)I pulled the trigger and shot him dead from the hip, which flipped the 'yote in the air.

It happened so quick, with the turkey landing somehow in a sappling less than six feet off the ground. He seemed to be thanking me and stayed there the whole time I inspected the stomach contents.

Kudos for New Jersey!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Nyflyangler wrote 2 years 15 weeks ago

The newjerseynewsroom.com actually calls the prairie wolves, which isn't a bad definition.

What I'm really interested in is a season that would allow me to shoot New Jerseyians. Especially the guy who threw a fit because I parked in front of his house when I visited my friends cross the street from him.

0 Good Comment? | | Report

Post a Comment

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