Please Sign In

Please enter a valid username and password
  • Log in with Facebook
» Not a member? Take a moment to register
» Forgot Username or Password

Why Register?
Signing up could earn you gear (click here to learn how)! It also keeps offensive content off our site.

Officials Remove Over 5,000 Pot Plants from CA Wildlife Habitat

Recent Comments

Categories

Recent Posts

Archives

Syndicate

Google Reader or Homepage
Add to My Yahoo!
Add to My AOL

Field Notes
in your Inbox

Enter your email address to get our new post everyday.

August 06, 2012

Officials Remove Over 5,000 Pot Plants from CA Wildlife Habitat

By Chad Love

The scourge of illicit drug production on our public lands is by now a depressingly well-trod subject, from cartel-funded pot growing operations on national forests to mobile meth labs. It's such a common thing that we should be accustom to it by now, but sometimes the sheer scale and criminal chutzpah of some of these operations still has the ability to make you shake your head.

From this story on news10.net:
The discovery of a large marijuana growing operation in south Sacramento County kept fish and game wardens busy Sunday afternoon. Wardens and other law enforcement officers chopped down more than 5,000 pot plants in the Cosumnes Wildlife Habitat in between the towns of Thornton and Galt. 

A California Highway Patrol chopper helped haul bags of pot plants, chemicals and equipment. "The concern right now is to get what damages the environment fuel fertilizer and things like that, we wanna get that out," Fish and Game Public spokesperson Andrew Hughan said. On Thursday, a game warden investigating a poaching tip, discovered the growing operation. He then had a face-to-face showdown with one of the suspects.

According to the story, the game warden came around a corner and met one of the growers, who was armed with a shotgun. Fortunately, the man surrendered when the warden drew his gun, but the suspect later told authorities that 12 others involved in the operation got away.

Think about that: this pot patch was so big it required the services of over a dozen criminals. And authorities have so far removed over 5,000 plants, 20 loads of fertilizer, 40 gallons of gasoline and eight propane containers. I'd hate to think what that area looks and smells like right now. And all this right out in the open on on a piece of public ground that you and I own. 

Is it getting worse? And if so, what can be done about it?

Comments (27)

Top Rated
All Comments
from Steward wrote 1 year 36 weeks ago

Getting worse? I don't know.
What can be done? Good question. What can be done about crime?
Parents: Raise your kids to be God-fearing, law-abiding citizens.
Other than that...
1 - Educate people about the laws of the land.
2 - Follow-through on stiff and painful penalties when laws are broken.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from redfishunter wrote 1 year 36 weeks ago

Legalize it. Then the over a dozen people working on the crop would be paying taxes. There would be no need to grow it on federal land. The side effects to the environment would be much less. 1 acre of marijuana plants can produce as much paper as 4.1 acres of pine trees, not to mention the length of time it takes for pine trees to grow. So it would actually help the environment. Know how many people in the world have died from an overdose of marijuana? Zero. None. America's biggest cash crop is illegal. Only reason people are opposed to it is because the government has shoved that mentality down their throats their whole lives.

+9 Good Comment? | | Report
from Steward wrote 1 year 36 weeks ago

Not much of an issue for me directly. I refuse to take in anything that is going to alter my state of mind. I'm opposed to it because I think it is a bad idea, not because of anything the government says. My uncle did in his 50's from lung cancer because he smoke all his life. I've seen people try to beat up their friends when they were drunk, and who knows the total number of deaths caused by alcohol. Are we to believe that these substances are dangerous, and harder drugs are dangerous, but pot is an innocent recreational drug? Sorry, I can't accept that. Besides, an overdose isn't the only way to die due to drug use.

As for the question in this post, which is a matter of people growing an illegal plant on public land, I'll stick with my previous answers.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from WA Mtnhunter wrote 1 year 36 weeks ago

OK, so let's turn all the pot production into funny smelling paper! LOL

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Josh Giannino wrote 1 year 36 weeks ago

hemp paper.. " teacher... I didnt do my homework cause I smoked it"

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from country road wrote 1 year 36 weeks ago

Legalize it and tax it.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from themadflyfisher wrote 1 year 36 weeks ago

I agree with redfishunter. Legalize it and take it out of the "cartels" hands then TAX it!

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Chris Pohlson wrote 1 year 36 weeks ago

Someone call Walter White. He'll know what to do.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from mutt wrote 1 year 36 weeks ago

all this means is 5000 more plants coming from Mexico to meet demand.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from mutt wrote 1 year 36 weeks ago

josh giannino - look it up hemp is a close cousin to marijuana and does not have THC in it.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from JohnR wrote 1 year 36 weeks ago

With 20 loads of fertilizer and all the gas and supplies, you'd think someone would have noticed all the commotion unless of course it was a very remote place.

About legalizing it and taxing it; even Pat Robertson is now saying it sould be decriminalized and legalized. Treat it like cigarettes. You're caught with untaxed marijuana cigarettes, you go to jail for an inconveniently long time. Also set price limits for the sale of the marijuana cigarettes that will allow growers to make a living but knock out all the big profit for the illegal growers and sellers. Allow home growers to grow enough for home consumption as in making one's own wine or beer.
Just a couple of ideas.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from dtbc333 wrote 1 year 36 weeks ago

There seems to be a lot of confusion between industrial hemp and smokable marijuana. Industrial hemp is a close cousin of the smokable form of marijuana, but is not the same thing. We are one of the only industrialized nations, if not the only one on the planet who prohibits the growing of hemp. Hemp doesn't contain enough of the active ingredients found in marijuana to cause any kind of "high," and the reasons for its illegality were political in nature. Aside from the benefits of industrial hemp, the drug war has been a tremendous failure. We have spent trillions fighting drugs with no results. Usage rates are not down. Crime associated with the drug trade is up. To answer Steward, it has been proven through multiple studies that marijuana is far less harmful than either alcohol or cigarettes.
I'm not trying to make any claims that there is no risk associated with its use, because the fact is there is risk associated with the use of any mind altering substance. All people react differently to those kinds of stimulus. That said, the dangers posed by the plant itself are so miniscule that there really is no way to justify the billions we spend trying to eradicate it. The violence we see associated with marijuana is due to the money at stake, not any effect of the plant. Make it legal and you take away the profit from the cartels and instead we the people get the benefits of it being taxed and regulated.
Even if you are against the idea of legalized marijuana, the notion that industrial hemp should remain illegal is a travesty. We have farmers in this country begging to grow it. We have the market for it because we import it from Canada and multiple European countries in huge quantities, and it's about as able to get you high as a field of corn is. It's used in everything from paper to cosmetics, however much of the opposition is coming from the timber industry who know that it is much more economic and environmentally friendly to make paper from hemp than it is from trees. When it comes to smokable marijuana the main lobbyists fighting to keep it illegal are from big pharmaceutical companies and alcohol and cigarette industries. Their opposition has nothing to do with your health and everything to do with their own profits. Everyone needs to take the time to truly educate themselves on the subject and not just make snap judgments based on 1960's propaganda.

+5 Good Comment? | | Report
from NorCal Cazadora wrote 1 year 36 weeks ago

This is a huge problem here. A friend of mine watched as the normally abundant deer started really thinning out in one of his regular hunting spots. He asked a warden what was going on and he was told there was a big grow operation and the guys taking care of it were camping out, and killing what they needed to eat on a daily basis, and leaving what they couldn't finish out to rot.

We had a ballot initiative to legalize pot a couple years ago, which I think would have helped with this problem, and who fought it the hardest? The medical marijuana dispensaries, which were making bank, and would've had to start paying taxes on their product.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from dtbc333 wrote 1 year 36 weeks ago

No idea where you are getting your information NorCal, but the medical dispensaries DO pay taxes. Lots of them. There was a show on NatGeo about a dispensary there in CA that received a 1 million dollar tax bill. They also pay tens of thousands of dollars in permit fees, only to have the cities that granted them those permits then turn face and kick them out of town without so much as a vote by the citizens. Do they refund any of the money they have taken from these small business owners? Of course not.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from GERG wrote 1 year 36 weeks ago

Dont use it wont use but have in the past and yes I did inhale haha. Just being honest here. I am all for legalization. It would create a massive industry and thousands of jobs. Use some of those tax dollars to come down harder on the harcore drugs. Also there would be alot more money for treatment for the aforementioned.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from HogBlog wrote 1 year 36 weeks ago

For what it's worth, NorCal and dbt333 are both sort of correct. The organization behind some of the major dispensaries fought the legalization effort in the recent election. Their argument was that it would never pass at that stage, and spending the resources to do so would be too large a drain on the bigger effort. Some folks believe it was because they had a big financial stake in the fight, and overall legalization would devastate their niche market.

At the same time, the major dispensaries are paying through the nose for the privilege of running a "legal" business. For those really interested, the numbers are available, but these guys are getting hit for a lot...and at the same time are supposed to be operating as non-profit, cooperatives.

To stay on topic, I agree that legalization will largely put an end to the abuses of public land. There are enough struggling farms out there who can profit from the availability of a new cash crop.

And even with all that said... the medical marijuana that is in highest demand is not even grown outdoors. It's grown inside, under closely controlled climates. The public land farms are supplying the illicit trade more than the "legal" demand.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from HogBlog wrote 1 year 36 weeks ago

For what it's worth, NorCal and dbt333 are both sort of correct. The organization behind some of the major dispensaries fought the legalization effort in the recent election. Their argument was that it would never pass at that stage, and spending the resources to do so would be too large a drain on the bigger effort. Some folks believe it was because they had a big financial stake in the fight, and overall legalization would devastate their niche market.

At the same time, the major dispensaries are paying through the nose for the privilege of running a "legal" business. For those really interested, the numbers are available, but these guys are getting hit for a lot...and at the same time are supposed to be operating as non-profit, cooperatives.

To stay on topic, I agree that legalization will largely put an end to the abuses of public land. There are enough struggling farms out there who can profit from the availability of a new cash crop.

And even with all that said... the medical marijuana that is in highest demand is not even grown outdoors. It's grown inside, under closely controlled climates. The public land farms are supplying the illicit trade more than the "legal" demand.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from wisc14 wrote 1 year 36 weeks ago

i just don't get the need of people to put crap in their bodies to make themselves feel good. it seems like the demand for drugs, booze, etc is only getting larger and larger

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Carl Huber wrote 1 year 36 weeks ago

Being a City Boy the only other prohibition I can draw on was the one my Dad experienced. He commented when alcohol was legalized it was way harder to get a drink. You couldn't buy it out of hours or on Sunday and you had to be of age. On the plus side you could have a cocktail without the fear of going blind. People forget that EVERYBODY drank beer and it gave the funding to a bunch of thugs that could then infiltrate legitimate business. They became and I quote "bigger than US Steel". As far as today when you have something that sells for $400 an OZ. and is measured in TONS. That is a lot of money. As far as these Pot Dispensaries go, one of my sons friends was in from California. Having grown up in the 60's. I broke his shoes and asked him if he could get me some Medical Marijuana. He replied no problem. Since I'm on Medicaid my doctors visit would be paid for and 80% of my pot would be paid for. And since it was a prescribed medicine I would not be taxed. All this and everybody is worrying about the cost of health care. By the way the tax that is in place is for a business. It would be a lot higher if they were selling cigarettes of the tobacco variety. As far as organized crime goes get rid of the profit and they go away. If you think I'm kidding make Bibles illegal and you will be awash in Bootleg Bibles.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Carl Huber wrote 1 year 36 weeks ago

PS As far as the scam of Medical Marijuana goes. Right now it is a Schedule One drug. Right up there with Heroin above Cocaine. It is schedule one because it is an intoxicant with no medical use. This is a back door method to have it rescheduled and ultimately legalized

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from dtbc333 wrote 1 year 36 weeks ago

Carl Huber- There have been multiple studies done proving that marijuana doesn't deserve its classification as a Schedule one drug. You are simply repeating propaganda. It has been PROVEN to have medical uses. A substance also being used for recreation doesn't mean it has no medical value. The most prescribed medications in the U.S. are extremely addictive Opiate based pain killers. Those are made from the same substance that in it's raw form is Opium, and after being processed is turned into Heroin. I'd like to see you walk into a dispensary and tell the cancer, MS, AIDS, and patients with severe chronic pain and eating disorders that they're just imagining the benefits, and they should go back to taking what is basically a "cleaner" version of heroin.
PS- Your friend is very misinformed. Doctors can't prescribe marijuana, only recommend it. You also must be a resident of the state in order to apply for a medicinal marijuana card. You also do have to pay sales tax on it. Many of the dispensaries simply roll this into the total price, so he may be under the impression he isn't paying taxes, but he is. I've also never heard of a dispensary who accepts any kind of insurance. Most can't even get banks to work with them out of fear of reprisal, to the point that they can't even get credit card machines hooked up to cash registers or ATMs in the lobby, much less get an insurance company to associate with them.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Carl Huber wrote 1 year 36 weeks ago

dtbc333; I'm the one whose misinformed. I have a daughter who under went chemotherapy. There were a host of legitimate drugs that helped her with her appetite. As far as being a class one drug. That is as easy as googling the scheduale. As far as a doctor "recommending" a prescription I don't think that is what a prescription is. A prescription is a prescription.As far as being tax free [depends on which state you're in] the "Medicine" can be deducted from your income tax as any other "prescription drug". And yes if I where a resident of California my Medicaid would cover my expenses. I am very much for the legalization of Marijuana having sampled it way before you were a thought. The only thing that amuses me is making it the Snake Oil and Patent Medicine of the 21st century. You want to say it increases appetite. That was already invented 400 years ago. It's called an Aperitif. Should it be legal YES. Should it be TAXED YES. Should some 17 year old that says he is anxious get a prescription? I'll leave that for the Comedy Channel.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Carl Huber wrote 1 year 36 weeks ago

PS As far as banks lending money. They are conservative institutions that do no get involved in GRAY AREAS of legitimacy. No one ever had a problem opening a "WINE BAR" with good credit.I wish they would make it legal just so "Stoners" would have something new to talk about.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Carl Huber wrote 1 year 36 weeks ago

PPS One more thing you might consider before you get your degree in medicine unlike my middle son. Cannabis has over 400 active ingredients. Disregarding it' a lot of fun to smoke. What you might want to consider is the interaction with legitimate medicine. I remember my my doctor telling me not to drink alcohol because it negated the antibiotics I was prescribed. Just like the patient medicine of old. It made you feel better without curing anything. If you can't understand my above posts Legalize it, Regulate it, Tax it

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Red Salas wrote 1 year 35 weeks ago

Im against all drugs but I can say you never hear in the news "Pot Head kills entire family while driving stond"

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from dtbc333 wrote 1 year 35 weeks ago

Carl, again, you are misinformed. A doctor can not prescribe marijuana. They can recommend it. This is how the law is written in medicinal marijuana states. They aren't "recommending a prescription." It IS NOT a prescription at all. I'm glad traditional drugs worked for your daughter, but they don't for everyone. The fact that pharmaceuticals may work for some people doesn't diminish the medicinal benefits of marijuana. That's like saying "Aspirin worked for me, so Tylenol isn't a medicine." You seem to have already made up your mind that you know the "facts" without actually looking anything up, so I'm sure this will fall on deaf ears. There is no "gray area" of legitimacy here except for the one people like you create. This is something that has been voted on, passed, and is part of our state constitution. The studies proving the medicinal value are out there. Ignorance of the truth doesn't make it untrue. The notion that dispensaries are filled with a bunch of 17 year olds is also laughable. First off, you must be 18 or older to get a medicinal marijuana card, with the exception of a few cases where special permission was granted(such as a kid who suffers severe seizures of the diaphragm that traditional medicine failed to help). Secondly, having been to many dispensaries, the vast majority of patients there are seriously ill. People with cancer, AIDS, MS, Muscular Dystrophy, nerve diseases, and other degenerative conditions make up the bulk of the patients. The majority of them are also not young, but middle age to elderly. I'm not sure what your point with it interacting with other medications is all about. I'm not trying to claim medicinal MJ is for everyone. There are plenty of what you call "legitimate" medications that can't be mixed together as well. Does this mean that they have no medicinal value? Of course not. It simply means that they react with other drugs. This is why you are supposed to tell your doctor all medications you are taking whenever discussing a new medication with them. Finally, the searching I have done has consistently turned up one answer as to whether medicaid covers MJ, and the answer is no. MJ is still federally illegal as we all know, and neither medicaid, or any private insurance company will cover it. Period. In some medicinal approved states you can get a small discount, but that's it. As to taxes, it is taxed. It can not be deducted from income tax like other prescriptions because it's not a prescription. You can look up the data for how much sales tax is taken in on it if you want. For the record, I'm not just some stoner babbling on about this. I too have had family members dealing with severe/terminal illnesses, and as a result chose to educate myself on the topic. Also, thanks for the snark about a medical degree, but I'm already working on a science degree, thanks.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from strong_arm wrote 1 year 25 weeks ago

industrial hemp will ruin the crop cultivated for drug use through cross pollination, but it would put the prisons and some polluters from the chemical industry out of business

large scale planting of industrial hemp is the solution, then cultivated weed for drugs can be developed in greenhouses and taxed like other mind-altering, body harming distractions (beer, liquor, pork, etc.)

+1 Good Comment? | | Report

Post a Comment

from redfishunter wrote 1 year 36 weeks ago

Legalize it. Then the over a dozen people working on the crop would be paying taxes. There would be no need to grow it on federal land. The side effects to the environment would be much less. 1 acre of marijuana plants can produce as much paper as 4.1 acres of pine trees, not to mention the length of time it takes for pine trees to grow. So it would actually help the environment. Know how many people in the world have died from an overdose of marijuana? Zero. None. America's biggest cash crop is illegal. Only reason people are opposed to it is because the government has shoved that mentality down their throats their whole lives.

+9 Good Comment? | | Report
from dtbc333 wrote 1 year 36 weeks ago

There seems to be a lot of confusion between industrial hemp and smokable marijuana. Industrial hemp is a close cousin of the smokable form of marijuana, but is not the same thing. We are one of the only industrialized nations, if not the only one on the planet who prohibits the growing of hemp. Hemp doesn't contain enough of the active ingredients found in marijuana to cause any kind of "high," and the reasons for its illegality were political in nature. Aside from the benefits of industrial hemp, the drug war has been a tremendous failure. We have spent trillions fighting drugs with no results. Usage rates are not down. Crime associated with the drug trade is up. To answer Steward, it has been proven through multiple studies that marijuana is far less harmful than either alcohol or cigarettes.
I'm not trying to make any claims that there is no risk associated with its use, because the fact is there is risk associated with the use of any mind altering substance. All people react differently to those kinds of stimulus. That said, the dangers posed by the plant itself are so miniscule that there really is no way to justify the billions we spend trying to eradicate it. The violence we see associated with marijuana is due to the money at stake, not any effect of the plant. Make it legal and you take away the profit from the cartels and instead we the people get the benefits of it being taxed and regulated.
Even if you are against the idea of legalized marijuana, the notion that industrial hemp should remain illegal is a travesty. We have farmers in this country begging to grow it. We have the market for it because we import it from Canada and multiple European countries in huge quantities, and it's about as able to get you high as a field of corn is. It's used in everything from paper to cosmetics, however much of the opposition is coming from the timber industry who know that it is much more economic and environmentally friendly to make paper from hemp than it is from trees. When it comes to smokable marijuana the main lobbyists fighting to keep it illegal are from big pharmaceutical companies and alcohol and cigarette industries. Their opposition has nothing to do with your health and everything to do with their own profits. Everyone needs to take the time to truly educate themselves on the subject and not just make snap judgments based on 1960's propaganda.

+5 Good Comment? | | Report
from country road wrote 1 year 36 weeks ago

Legalize it and tax it.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from dtbc333 wrote 1 year 36 weeks ago

No idea where you are getting your information NorCal, but the medical dispensaries DO pay taxes. Lots of them. There was a show on NatGeo about a dispensary there in CA that received a 1 million dollar tax bill. They also pay tens of thousands of dollars in permit fees, only to have the cities that granted them those permits then turn face and kick them out of town without so much as a vote by the citizens. Do they refund any of the money they have taken from these small business owners? Of course not.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from WA Mtnhunter wrote 1 year 36 weeks ago

OK, so let's turn all the pot production into funny smelling paper! LOL

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from themadflyfisher wrote 1 year 36 weeks ago

I agree with redfishunter. Legalize it and take it out of the "cartels" hands then TAX it!

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from mutt wrote 1 year 36 weeks ago

josh giannino - look it up hemp is a close cousin to marijuana and does not have THC in it.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from JohnR wrote 1 year 36 weeks ago

With 20 loads of fertilizer and all the gas and supplies, you'd think someone would have noticed all the commotion unless of course it was a very remote place.

About legalizing it and taxing it; even Pat Robertson is now saying it sould be decriminalized and legalized. Treat it like cigarettes. You're caught with untaxed marijuana cigarettes, you go to jail for an inconveniently long time. Also set price limits for the sale of the marijuana cigarettes that will allow growers to make a living but knock out all the big profit for the illegal growers and sellers. Allow home growers to grow enough for home consumption as in making one's own wine or beer.
Just a couple of ideas.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Steward wrote 1 year 36 weeks ago

Getting worse? I don't know.
What can be done? Good question. What can be done about crime?
Parents: Raise your kids to be God-fearing, law-abiding citizens.
Other than that...
1 - Educate people about the laws of the land.
2 - Follow-through on stiff and painful penalties when laws are broken.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Chris Pohlson wrote 1 year 36 weeks ago

Someone call Walter White. He'll know what to do.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from mutt wrote 1 year 36 weeks ago

all this means is 5000 more plants coming from Mexico to meet demand.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from NorCal Cazadora wrote 1 year 36 weeks ago

This is a huge problem here. A friend of mine watched as the normally abundant deer started really thinning out in one of his regular hunting spots. He asked a warden what was going on and he was told there was a big grow operation and the guys taking care of it were camping out, and killing what they needed to eat on a daily basis, and leaving what they couldn't finish out to rot.

We had a ballot initiative to legalize pot a couple years ago, which I think would have helped with this problem, and who fought it the hardest? The medical marijuana dispensaries, which were making bank, and would've had to start paying taxes on their product.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from GERG wrote 1 year 36 weeks ago

Dont use it wont use but have in the past and yes I did inhale haha. Just being honest here. I am all for legalization. It would create a massive industry and thousands of jobs. Use some of those tax dollars to come down harder on the harcore drugs. Also there would be alot more money for treatment for the aforementioned.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from strong_arm wrote 1 year 25 weeks ago

industrial hemp will ruin the crop cultivated for drug use through cross pollination, but it would put the prisons and some polluters from the chemical industry out of business

large scale planting of industrial hemp is the solution, then cultivated weed for drugs can be developed in greenhouses and taxed like other mind-altering, body harming distractions (beer, liquor, pork, etc.)

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Steward wrote 1 year 36 weeks ago

Not much of an issue for me directly. I refuse to take in anything that is going to alter my state of mind. I'm opposed to it because I think it is a bad idea, not because of anything the government says. My uncle did in his 50's from lung cancer because he smoke all his life. I've seen people try to beat up their friends when they were drunk, and who knows the total number of deaths caused by alcohol. Are we to believe that these substances are dangerous, and harder drugs are dangerous, but pot is an innocent recreational drug? Sorry, I can't accept that. Besides, an overdose isn't the only way to die due to drug use.

As for the question in this post, which is a matter of people growing an illegal plant on public land, I'll stick with my previous answers.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Josh Giannino wrote 1 year 36 weeks ago

hemp paper.. " teacher... I didnt do my homework cause I smoked it"

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from HogBlog wrote 1 year 36 weeks ago

For what it's worth, NorCal and dbt333 are both sort of correct. The organization behind some of the major dispensaries fought the legalization effort in the recent election. Their argument was that it would never pass at that stage, and spending the resources to do so would be too large a drain on the bigger effort. Some folks believe it was because they had a big financial stake in the fight, and overall legalization would devastate their niche market.

At the same time, the major dispensaries are paying through the nose for the privilege of running a "legal" business. For those really interested, the numbers are available, but these guys are getting hit for a lot...and at the same time are supposed to be operating as non-profit, cooperatives.

To stay on topic, I agree that legalization will largely put an end to the abuses of public land. There are enough struggling farms out there who can profit from the availability of a new cash crop.

And even with all that said... the medical marijuana that is in highest demand is not even grown outdoors. It's grown inside, under closely controlled climates. The public land farms are supplying the illicit trade more than the "legal" demand.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from HogBlog wrote 1 year 36 weeks ago

For what it's worth, NorCal and dbt333 are both sort of correct. The organization behind some of the major dispensaries fought the legalization effort in the recent election. Their argument was that it would never pass at that stage, and spending the resources to do so would be too large a drain on the bigger effort. Some folks believe it was because they had a big financial stake in the fight, and overall legalization would devastate their niche market.

At the same time, the major dispensaries are paying through the nose for the privilege of running a "legal" business. For those really interested, the numbers are available, but these guys are getting hit for a lot...and at the same time are supposed to be operating as non-profit, cooperatives.

To stay on topic, I agree that legalization will largely put an end to the abuses of public land. There are enough struggling farms out there who can profit from the availability of a new cash crop.

And even with all that said... the medical marijuana that is in highest demand is not even grown outdoors. It's grown inside, under closely controlled climates. The public land farms are supplying the illicit trade more than the "legal" demand.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from wisc14 wrote 1 year 36 weeks ago

i just don't get the need of people to put crap in their bodies to make themselves feel good. it seems like the demand for drugs, booze, etc is only getting larger and larger

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Carl Huber wrote 1 year 36 weeks ago

Being a City Boy the only other prohibition I can draw on was the one my Dad experienced. He commented when alcohol was legalized it was way harder to get a drink. You couldn't buy it out of hours or on Sunday and you had to be of age. On the plus side you could have a cocktail without the fear of going blind. People forget that EVERYBODY drank beer and it gave the funding to a bunch of thugs that could then infiltrate legitimate business. They became and I quote "bigger than US Steel". As far as today when you have something that sells for $400 an OZ. and is measured in TONS. That is a lot of money. As far as these Pot Dispensaries go, one of my sons friends was in from California. Having grown up in the 60's. I broke his shoes and asked him if he could get me some Medical Marijuana. He replied no problem. Since I'm on Medicaid my doctors visit would be paid for and 80% of my pot would be paid for. And since it was a prescribed medicine I would not be taxed. All this and everybody is worrying about the cost of health care. By the way the tax that is in place is for a business. It would be a lot higher if they were selling cigarettes of the tobacco variety. As far as organized crime goes get rid of the profit and they go away. If you think I'm kidding make Bibles illegal and you will be awash in Bootleg Bibles.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Carl Huber wrote 1 year 36 weeks ago

PS As far as the scam of Medical Marijuana goes. Right now it is a Schedule One drug. Right up there with Heroin above Cocaine. It is schedule one because it is an intoxicant with no medical use. This is a back door method to have it rescheduled and ultimately legalized

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from dtbc333 wrote 1 year 36 weeks ago

Carl Huber- There have been multiple studies done proving that marijuana doesn't deserve its classification as a Schedule one drug. You are simply repeating propaganda. It has been PROVEN to have medical uses. A substance also being used for recreation doesn't mean it has no medical value. The most prescribed medications in the U.S. are extremely addictive Opiate based pain killers. Those are made from the same substance that in it's raw form is Opium, and after being processed is turned into Heroin. I'd like to see you walk into a dispensary and tell the cancer, MS, AIDS, and patients with severe chronic pain and eating disorders that they're just imagining the benefits, and they should go back to taking what is basically a "cleaner" version of heroin.
PS- Your friend is very misinformed. Doctors can't prescribe marijuana, only recommend it. You also must be a resident of the state in order to apply for a medicinal marijuana card. You also do have to pay sales tax on it. Many of the dispensaries simply roll this into the total price, so he may be under the impression he isn't paying taxes, but he is. I've also never heard of a dispensary who accepts any kind of insurance. Most can't even get banks to work with them out of fear of reprisal, to the point that they can't even get credit card machines hooked up to cash registers or ATMs in the lobby, much less get an insurance company to associate with them.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Carl Huber wrote 1 year 36 weeks ago

dtbc333; I'm the one whose misinformed. I have a daughter who under went chemotherapy. There were a host of legitimate drugs that helped her with her appetite. As far as being a class one drug. That is as easy as googling the scheduale. As far as a doctor "recommending" a prescription I don't think that is what a prescription is. A prescription is a prescription.As far as being tax free [depends on which state you're in] the "Medicine" can be deducted from your income tax as any other "prescription drug". And yes if I where a resident of California my Medicaid would cover my expenses. I am very much for the legalization of Marijuana having sampled it way before you were a thought. The only thing that amuses me is making it the Snake Oil and Patent Medicine of the 21st century. You want to say it increases appetite. That was already invented 400 years ago. It's called an Aperitif. Should it be legal YES. Should it be TAXED YES. Should some 17 year old that says he is anxious get a prescription? I'll leave that for the Comedy Channel.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Carl Huber wrote 1 year 36 weeks ago

PS As far as banks lending money. They are conservative institutions that do no get involved in GRAY AREAS of legitimacy. No one ever had a problem opening a "WINE BAR" with good credit.I wish they would make it legal just so "Stoners" would have something new to talk about.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Carl Huber wrote 1 year 36 weeks ago

PPS One more thing you might consider before you get your degree in medicine unlike my middle son. Cannabis has over 400 active ingredients. Disregarding it' a lot of fun to smoke. What you might want to consider is the interaction with legitimate medicine. I remember my my doctor telling me not to drink alcohol because it negated the antibiotics I was prescribed. Just like the patient medicine of old. It made you feel better without curing anything. If you can't understand my above posts Legalize it, Regulate it, Tax it

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Red Salas wrote 1 year 35 weeks ago

Im against all drugs but I can say you never hear in the news "Pot Head kills entire family while driving stond"

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from dtbc333 wrote 1 year 35 weeks ago

Carl, again, you are misinformed. A doctor can not prescribe marijuana. They can recommend it. This is how the law is written in medicinal marijuana states. They aren't "recommending a prescription." It IS NOT a prescription at all. I'm glad traditional drugs worked for your daughter, but they don't for everyone. The fact that pharmaceuticals may work for some people doesn't diminish the medicinal benefits of marijuana. That's like saying "Aspirin worked for me, so Tylenol isn't a medicine." You seem to have already made up your mind that you know the "facts" without actually looking anything up, so I'm sure this will fall on deaf ears. There is no "gray area" of legitimacy here except for the one people like you create. This is something that has been voted on, passed, and is part of our state constitution. The studies proving the medicinal value are out there. Ignorance of the truth doesn't make it untrue. The notion that dispensaries are filled with a bunch of 17 year olds is also laughable. First off, you must be 18 or older to get a medicinal marijuana card, with the exception of a few cases where special permission was granted(such as a kid who suffers severe seizures of the diaphragm that traditional medicine failed to help). Secondly, having been to many dispensaries, the vast majority of patients there are seriously ill. People with cancer, AIDS, MS, Muscular Dystrophy, nerve diseases, and other degenerative conditions make up the bulk of the patients. The majority of them are also not young, but middle age to elderly. I'm not sure what your point with it interacting with other medications is all about. I'm not trying to claim medicinal MJ is for everyone. There are plenty of what you call "legitimate" medications that can't be mixed together as well. Does this mean that they have no medicinal value? Of course not. It simply means that they react with other drugs. This is why you are supposed to tell your doctor all medications you are taking whenever discussing a new medication with them. Finally, the searching I have done has consistently turned up one answer as to whether medicaid covers MJ, and the answer is no. MJ is still federally illegal as we all know, and neither medicaid, or any private insurance company will cover it. Period. In some medicinal approved states you can get a small discount, but that's it. As to taxes, it is taxed. It can not be deducted from income tax like other prescriptions because it's not a prescription. You can look up the data for how much sales tax is taken in on it if you want. For the record, I'm not just some stoner babbling on about this. I too have had family members dealing with severe/terminal illnesses, and as a result chose to educate myself on the topic. Also, thanks for the snark about a medical degree, but I'm already working on a science degree, thanks.

0 Good Comment? | | Report

Post a Comment