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Minnesota Hunters Tag 69 Wolves So Far in Inaugural Season

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November 07, 2012

Minnesota Hunters Tag 69 Wolves So Far in Inaugural Season

By Chad Love

Minnesota hunters have killed 69 wolves so far in the state's inaugural wolf season, according to this story in the Minneapolis Star-Tribune:

Sixty-nine wolves now have been killed since Saturday in Minnesota's controversial inaugural wolf-hunting season. Thirty-two wolves were killed Saturday, 18 on Sunday and 16 on Monday. Three more have been registered Tuesday. The breakdown: Thirty-two wolves have been killed in the DNR's Northwest Zone, where the target is 133, 29 in the Northeast Zone, where the target is 58, and eight in the East Central Zone, where the target is nine. That zone was closed to wolf hunters at the end of the day Monday.

A total of 3,600 licenses were issued for the early wolf season. There is a 400-wolf quota -- 200 in the early season that runs concurrently with the firearms deer season and 200 in a second hunting-and-trapping season that will open Nov. 24.

Thoughts? Think Minnesota will eventually make its wolf quota?

Comments (5)

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from larson014 wrote 1 year 23 weeks ago

they might make it but it will always be easier to run concurrently with a deer season, puts more hunters in the woods, it is also before the deep snow comes, which makes it alot easier to get back into the woods real deep...

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from natureonthefly wrote 1 year 23 weeks ago

I'm not sure if I am misguided in my thoughts, but I am still skeptical of these predator hunts. I always am suspicious that the wolves need to be hunted so extensively. I am always suspicious of the idea that humans not wanting predators around spurs these hunts more than true statistics. Am I totally misguided with this idea? Any one have anything I could read into for more information. As a college biology student I am always interested on these wildlife/conservation related posts. Just something I've been thinking about over the last few weeks and I figure this is the place to ask.

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from northernminneso... wrote 1 year 23 weeks ago

natureonthefly I would not really consider this an extensive hunt by any means. In MN we have a very large wolf population ~3,000 which about as many as the rest of the lower 48 combined. From what I have read this past year wolf depredation of livestock and pets are at record highs. Also from the stories that I've heard in some parts wolves aren't as you would think. There are a few stories that I know where wolves run into people in the woods and act like it is no big deal and go back to their usual business. Personally I don't think that the 400 animal limit will be reached, my guess is 330 animals tagged. Most of the people that got one for the early season aren't going to be targeting them selectively but have the tag if they happen to see one. From what I've heard wolves in general are smart. On top of that I think that since nobody has hunted wolves in state in the last forty years, this season will be more of a learning curve year for hunters.

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from natureonthefly wrote 1 year 23 weeks ago

thanks for that response. I didn't realize there was such a large population in MN. I can definitely understand the given goals then. Like I said, I am just simply suspicious and always enjoy learning more and hearing others info.

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from Panagioti Tsolkas wrote 1 year 22 weeks ago

Apex predators like wolves have proven to be a stabilizing presence in their native ecosystems, improving the over-all health of habitat. You are right to be suspicious of the hunt. When an ecosystem is healthy, it means the long-term quality of hunting is improved. Protecting livestock and pets is not a legitimate reason to drive wolf populations back down. Hunting for wolves is short-sighted. There is a world of difference between the desire to protect your family, and these trophy hunts of an animal that was already driven to near extinction by a fabricated hysteria of generations past.

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from larson014 wrote 1 year 23 weeks ago

they might make it but it will always be easier to run concurrently with a deer season, puts more hunters in the woods, it is also before the deep snow comes, which makes it alot easier to get back into the woods real deep...

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from natureonthefly wrote 1 year 23 weeks ago

I'm not sure if I am misguided in my thoughts, but I am still skeptical of these predator hunts. I always am suspicious that the wolves need to be hunted so extensively. I am always suspicious of the idea that humans not wanting predators around spurs these hunts more than true statistics. Am I totally misguided with this idea? Any one have anything I could read into for more information. As a college biology student I am always interested on these wildlife/conservation related posts. Just something I've been thinking about over the last few weeks and I figure this is the place to ask.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from northernminneso... wrote 1 year 23 weeks ago

natureonthefly I would not really consider this an extensive hunt by any means. In MN we have a very large wolf population ~3,000 which about as many as the rest of the lower 48 combined. From what I have read this past year wolf depredation of livestock and pets are at record highs. Also from the stories that I've heard in some parts wolves aren't as you would think. There are a few stories that I know where wolves run into people in the woods and act like it is no big deal and go back to their usual business. Personally I don't think that the 400 animal limit will be reached, my guess is 330 animals tagged. Most of the people that got one for the early season aren't going to be targeting them selectively but have the tag if they happen to see one. From what I've heard wolves in general are smart. On top of that I think that since nobody has hunted wolves in state in the last forty years, this season will be more of a learning curve year for hunters.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from natureonthefly wrote 1 year 23 weeks ago

thanks for that response. I didn't realize there was such a large population in MN. I can definitely understand the given goals then. Like I said, I am just simply suspicious and always enjoy learning more and hearing others info.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Panagioti Tsolkas wrote 1 year 22 weeks ago

Apex predators like wolves have proven to be a stabilizing presence in their native ecosystems, improving the over-all health of habitat. You are right to be suspicious of the hunt. When an ecosystem is healthy, it means the long-term quality of hunting is improved. Protecting livestock and pets is not a legitimate reason to drive wolf populations back down. Hunting for wolves is short-sighted. There is a world of difference between the desire to protect your family, and these trophy hunts of an animal that was already driven to near extinction by a fabricated hysteria of generations past.

0 Good Comment? | | Report

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