Please Sign In

Please enter a valid username and password
  • Log in with Facebook
» Not a member? Take a moment to register
» Forgot Username or Password

Why Register?
Signing up could earn you gear (click here to learn how)! It also keeps offensive content off our site.

PA Hunter's Treestand Falls Apart, Leaves Him Dangling

Recent Comments

Categories

Recent Posts

Archives

Syndicate

Google Reader or Homepage
Add to My Yahoo!
Add to My AOL

Field Notes
in your Inbox

Enter your email address to get our new post everyday.

November 14, 2012

PA Hunter's Treestand Falls Apart, Leaves Him Dangling

By Chad Love

A Pennsylvania hunter was left dangling in a tree after his tree stand apparently fell apart—with him in it. 

From this story on cbsnews.com:
A western Pennsylvania hunter whose tree stand broke had to be rescued from his perch, where he was left dangling about 15 feet off the ground. Brush Valley assistant fire chief Al Pluchinsky says James Yoder, of Johnstown, was hunting late Saturday afternoon when the stand came apart. Yoder's feet got tangled and he was dangling, although his hunting partner helped by trying to hold his head somewhat upright while they yelled for help. 

According to the story, Yoder was treated and released from a local hospital. Sounds like he may have been wearing a safety harness, but the story is unclear. Interesting, though, that his stand apparently just fell apart. Most tree stand injuries result from a fall, not the stand itself collapsing. But it can happen. Anything like that ever happen to you?

Comments (12)

Top Rated
All Comments
from natureonthefly wrote 1 year 22 weeks ago

Not yet, but I always have a slight uneasiness sitting in my climbing stand. I know they are safe, but there's always that small appreciation of my life that sits back there. As a rock climber, I am used to heights, but I prefer things that are somewhat sturdier and more bombproof than many stands seem to be.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Sarge01 wrote 1 year 22 weeks ago

My neighbor sustained a broken back ( he is okay and not paralyzed thank God) when a bolt broke on his stand just when he was taking his last step up the tree. He hadn't hooked up his safety harness yet. The stand wasn't even a year old and hadn't been left out in the elements.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from jay wrote 1 year 22 weeks ago

Many of the stands today are made in China and the craftsmen shows. The Chinese don't give a crap if you get injured or mamed. I have a mixture of purchased and homemade stands, the homemade are heavier but certainly much sturdier.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from buckhunter wrote 1 year 22 weeks ago

Had the pleasure of hunting out of all sorts of climbers over the past 30 years. Many of which would be best described as trapdoor treestands. Unbelievably dangerous junk was sold to hunters back in the day. The treestand industry has become much safer over the years.

Come to think of it, it was 30 years ago today I shot my first archery deer. 9 point buck.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from neuman23 wrote 1 year 22 weeks ago

Had the lower half of my climber drop, while climbing, from 12 ft up to the bottom of the tree. Was able to shimmy the top down and drop onto it without incident. I feel extremely blessed nothing serious happened and I will definitely think twice about using it again, might tie a rope holding the two parts together.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Savageshot wrote 1 year 22 weeks ago

neuman23 i dont know what kind of stand you have but i know my summit came with a rope for tieing the top and bottom together and its also in the instructions and safety warnings

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from jjas wrote 1 year 22 weeks ago

I started hunting back when people climbed into "homemade" permanent stands or stood on a limb.

My first climber was a Baker. You hugged the tree and pulled your feet up. The next climber I purchased was a Loggy Bayou. It was much safer than a baker but by today's standards it was still a death trap.

Then I went to hang ons. Getting in and out was always the "adventure" part of the hunt.

Now, I only hunt out of towers, ladders and ground blinds.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Pathfinder1 wrote 1 year 22 weeks ago

Hi...

Here in the lower Catskill Mountains we have had at least two emergency calls for hunters fallen out of trees recently. Received no info on how injured they had gotten.

One of the hunters who fell evidently had a heart attack. Don't know if that occurred prior to the climb or after.

Am unable to imagine why any hunter in a tree stand won't wear a proper harness. Some are just stubborn, I guess ...won't wear a PFD while on the water, or a helmet while biking, etc.

Hey...it doesn't always happen to the OTHER guy...!!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from ejunk wrote 1 year 22 weeks ago

reason #5,723 to hunt from the ground rather than a treestand: it is exceedingly unlikely that the ground will fall away beneath you.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Dhoovak wrote 1 year 21 weeks ago

While still on the ground my boot hit the side of my climber while getting into it, making
me fall over backwards. I got knocked out and was on the ground almost 30 minutes before
gaining consciousness. Not all accidents happen up high! Good thing I didn't have any doe
pee on me!

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from JohnR wrote 1 year 21 weeks ago

I understand all the arguments for the harness when using treestands and believe me I am not stupid or careless however, and that's a big however, When I use my climbing stand I doubt I will ever use a harness for a couple of reasons. The first is my climber stands are custom crafted by an individual who unfortunately passed away fron cancer. I had one weld break in one of my two stands in over twenty years. The break occurred in the V section where it contacts the tree and the stand still allowed me to climb down safely which I did immediately. Second, these stands are equipped with a lock system that locks the bottom of the seat portion to the tree so it can't be kicked away from the tree accidently. Third I always sit facing the tree. There is no way for me to fall out of the stand because I am enclosed on all four sides. (There is a good size backrest on the rear of the seat section.)
Now to prove that I am actually sane, I do use a harness and safety line when I use a ladder stand, or if I use my climbing stand where I sit facing away from the tree. (The seat section slides in channel aluminum so it can be used facing the tree or facing away from the tree.) Obviously if one sits facing away from the tree and pitches forward there is no other way but down.
I imagine it won't be long however and maybe in my lifetime that the insurance companies and harness makers will lobby state legislatures to make it a requirement that a safety harness be mandatory when hunting X number of feet above ground level; sort of like the hunter orange hat rule required by many states.
Then we'll have to put up with the harness police.

-1 Good Comment? | | Report
from TinEagle wrote 1 year 20 weeks ago

neuman23, I have straps on both the front and back of my climber so if the bottom drops, it will fall into place. Having only one strap leaves the lower platform dangling and it is difficult (and dangerous) trying to foot hook it or worse, grab it with your hand while perched on the upper rail. I use a single line furthest away from the tree and a "V" line closest to the tree. The V line straightens it out and centers it.

0 Good Comment? | | Report

Post a Comment

from Dhoovak wrote 1 year 21 weeks ago

While still on the ground my boot hit the side of my climber while getting into it, making
me fall over backwards. I got knocked out and was on the ground almost 30 minutes before
gaining consciousness. Not all accidents happen up high! Good thing I didn't have any doe
pee on me!

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from natureonthefly wrote 1 year 22 weeks ago

Not yet, but I always have a slight uneasiness sitting in my climbing stand. I know they are safe, but there's always that small appreciation of my life that sits back there. As a rock climber, I am used to heights, but I prefer things that are somewhat sturdier and more bombproof than many stands seem to be.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Sarge01 wrote 1 year 22 weeks ago

My neighbor sustained a broken back ( he is okay and not paralyzed thank God) when a bolt broke on his stand just when he was taking his last step up the tree. He hadn't hooked up his safety harness yet. The stand wasn't even a year old and hadn't been left out in the elements.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from jay wrote 1 year 22 weeks ago

Many of the stands today are made in China and the craftsmen shows. The Chinese don't give a crap if you get injured or mamed. I have a mixture of purchased and homemade stands, the homemade are heavier but certainly much sturdier.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from buckhunter wrote 1 year 22 weeks ago

Had the pleasure of hunting out of all sorts of climbers over the past 30 years. Many of which would be best described as trapdoor treestands. Unbelievably dangerous junk was sold to hunters back in the day. The treestand industry has become much safer over the years.

Come to think of it, it was 30 years ago today I shot my first archery deer. 9 point buck.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from neuman23 wrote 1 year 22 weeks ago

Had the lower half of my climber drop, while climbing, from 12 ft up to the bottom of the tree. Was able to shimmy the top down and drop onto it without incident. I feel extremely blessed nothing serious happened and I will definitely think twice about using it again, might tie a rope holding the two parts together.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Savageshot wrote 1 year 22 weeks ago

neuman23 i dont know what kind of stand you have but i know my summit came with a rope for tieing the top and bottom together and its also in the instructions and safety warnings

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from jjas wrote 1 year 22 weeks ago

I started hunting back when people climbed into "homemade" permanent stands or stood on a limb.

My first climber was a Baker. You hugged the tree and pulled your feet up. The next climber I purchased was a Loggy Bayou. It was much safer than a baker but by today's standards it was still a death trap.

Then I went to hang ons. Getting in and out was always the "adventure" part of the hunt.

Now, I only hunt out of towers, ladders and ground blinds.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Pathfinder1 wrote 1 year 22 weeks ago

Hi...

Here in the lower Catskill Mountains we have had at least two emergency calls for hunters fallen out of trees recently. Received no info on how injured they had gotten.

One of the hunters who fell evidently had a heart attack. Don't know if that occurred prior to the climb or after.

Am unable to imagine why any hunter in a tree stand won't wear a proper harness. Some are just stubborn, I guess ...won't wear a PFD while on the water, or a helmet while biking, etc.

Hey...it doesn't always happen to the OTHER guy...!!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from ejunk wrote 1 year 22 weeks ago

reason #5,723 to hunt from the ground rather than a treestand: it is exceedingly unlikely that the ground will fall away beneath you.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from TinEagle wrote 1 year 20 weeks ago

neuman23, I have straps on both the front and back of my climber so if the bottom drops, it will fall into place. Having only one strap leaves the lower platform dangling and it is difficult (and dangerous) trying to foot hook it or worse, grab it with your hand while perched on the upper rail. I use a single line furthest away from the tree and a "V" line closest to the tree. The V line straightens it out and centers it.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from JohnR wrote 1 year 21 weeks ago

I understand all the arguments for the harness when using treestands and believe me I am not stupid or careless however, and that's a big however, When I use my climbing stand I doubt I will ever use a harness for a couple of reasons. The first is my climber stands are custom crafted by an individual who unfortunately passed away fron cancer. I had one weld break in one of my two stands in over twenty years. The break occurred in the V section where it contacts the tree and the stand still allowed me to climb down safely which I did immediately. Second, these stands are equipped with a lock system that locks the bottom of the seat portion to the tree so it can't be kicked away from the tree accidently. Third I always sit facing the tree. There is no way for me to fall out of the stand because I am enclosed on all four sides. (There is a good size backrest on the rear of the seat section.)
Now to prove that I am actually sane, I do use a harness and safety line when I use a ladder stand, or if I use my climbing stand where I sit facing away from the tree. (The seat section slides in channel aluminum so it can be used facing the tree or facing away from the tree.) Obviously if one sits facing away from the tree and pitches forward there is no other way but down.
I imagine it won't be long however and maybe in my lifetime that the insurance companies and harness makers will lobby state legislatures to make it a requirement that a safety harness be mandatory when hunting X number of feet above ground level; sort of like the hunter orange hat rule required by many states.
Then we'll have to put up with the harness police.

-1 Good Comment? | | Report

Post a Comment