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Cubs Manager Accidently Shot by Baseball Hall-of-Famer Robin Yount While Quail Hunting

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December 05, 2012

Cubs Manager Accidently Shot by Baseball Hall-of-Famer Robin Yount While Quail Hunting

By Chad Love

It was revealed this week that baseball Hall of Famer Robin Yount accidentally shot the manager of the Chicago Cubs, Dale Sveum, while quail hunting earlier this year in Arizona.

From this story in the Chicago Sun-Times:
And Dale Sveum thought he had a bad year before October. Turns out that 101-loss season in his first year as Cubs manager was only the start of the bleeding for Sveum, who suffered minor injuries in a Dick Cheney-like accident while hunting quail in Arizona with Hall of Fame pal Robin Yount earlier this fall. ‘‘It’s not that big a deal,’’ claimed the famously cool Sveum, who took birdshot in the back and right ear from about 50 yards away. ‘‘Yeah, there was blood. . . .‘‘The bird got up in front of him, and he lost track of where I was and pulled the trigger and, ‘Uh-oh.’ I was just looking for birds myself. It was behind me, so I got drilled with pellets in the back and one stuck in the ear.’’

Good to hear he's all right. Do you think these accidents occur because, sometimes, groups tend to break up to hunt singles after a covey rise? Tell us how you safely hunt both covey rises and singles.

Comments (23)

Top Rated
All Comments
from rock rat wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

I liked the Rick Cheney one better. Drunk politicians and guns, what could go wrong?

Filter didn't like VP Cheney's first name. If the shoe fits I say.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from TM wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

Key to hunting safely is to be 100 percent dead certain where fellow hunters are and pretty certain where the dogs are (dogs are shorter than people, get lost in the brush, and move around after the flush, so it's tough to be sure with dogs). Then, and only then, can you worry about the birds.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from TM wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

Key to hunting safely is to be 100 percent dead certain where fellow hunters are and pretty certain where the dogs are (dogs are shorter than people, get lost in the brush, and move around after the flush, so it's tough to be sure with dogs). Then, and only then, can you worry about the birds.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from buckhunter wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

If you really want a good laugh. Check out ESPN.com's article on this subject. Their ignorance for all things involving guns really shines through.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from clinchknot wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

I would question Mr. VP's ignorance. The guy is an avid sportsman. And he is a very good fly angler. I always dreamed about taking him down my river that is his favorite river to flyfish. The baggage that would go along with it would not make the float very fun however. He also owns fine shotguns, and luvs his 28ga. O/U I have read. He got attacked vigorously by the left, and the comment that attached drunkedness to the hunting accident fell in line with one of those false attacks.

-1 Good Comment? | | Report
from hermit crab wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

Agree with buckhunter. Seems like he fancies himself quite the marksman, hunting quail with a revolver...

"Sveum was hit in the back of the right ear by the spray pattern from a six-shot."

-1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Half-of-two wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

Well, if it had been Sveum that shot Yount, I never would've believed it...the Cubs couldn't hit anything all year!

This, coming from a die-hard Cubs fan! We'll get 'em next season!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from clinchknot wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

How about if "X" Cubs manager, Lou Pinella, had been the one shot!? He would have returned fire, then gone over, and kicked Yount why he was down! We had him in Seattle. Quite a character Sweet Lou.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Ontario Honker ... wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

I almost always hunt alone so it's usually not an issue for me. However, I commonly hunt in among cattle and horses and haven't shot one yet. I'm never in that big a hurry, nor do I need to shoot something so badly that I hurry the shot. But I don't hunt quail either. Sounds like maybe that's not a bad idea!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Jerry A. wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

@Half-of-two: No offense, but haven't the Cubs been saying they'll get 'em next season for over a century? Of course, I'm a Cardsinals fan, so I have to get my digs in.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from kingofbirds wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

www.electroniceliquid.com
I almost always hunt alone so it's usually not an issue for me. However, I commonly hunt in among cattle and horses and haven't shot one yet. I'm never in that big a hurry, nor do I need to shoot something so badly that I hurry the shot. But I don't hunt quail either. Sounds like maybe that's not a bad idea!

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from dleurquin wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

Know your target and what's beyond. Mr. Yount needs to take a firearms safety class.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Sb Wacker wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

Hmm maybe those Blaze orange jackets aren't such a bad idea after all
SBW

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from clinchknot wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

I think everyone can perceive a situation where that could happen. I think of it from time to time. Say you are hunting with a buddy you KNOW is off to your left. On your right some 30 yds say, is a depression area, say a slew that has a higher bank, visualize it having bushes on the bank top. Birds flush to your right headed that way, you swing, but another hunter has just popped up on the bank top, and between some bushes. You don't swing and fire making sure first you check out that area visually? I can see someone swinging, and firing, and THEN realizing someone has just popped up over the bank. Maybe he's even behind a bush. More than likely doesn't kill the guy, but I can see him getting hit in this unusual circumstance. That is why I don't rifle hunt. Guys shoot at running game. They can't focus on the target animal, and know what is in the animals periphery in a lot of wooded situations.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Ontario Honker ... wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

So now the spammers are set up to plagiarize our posts? Sorry, but I don't feel honored. Jackasses!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from dleurquin wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

Clinch, I agree with you. There are scenarios where it could happen to the "safest" of hunters out there and your scenario is a good example. However, if everybody in your group, for instance, is walking a line and trying to keep that line straight through visual and verbal cues (in other words, no one is getting ahead of anyone else), AND if you don't shoot beyond a 30 degree angle in front/back of you if you're in the middle. Obviously those angles increase if you're on the ends/corners of this hunting line.

Somebody mentioned the V.P.'s shooting incident. I heard the guy who got pelted by the V.P., left the hunting group in the middle of the hunt, then walked back to join the hunting party without making contact beforehand. If that's the case, then both the guy who got shot and the V.P. share in the responsibility of that goof up. I would lay a lot of heat on the guy who leaves my hunting party, then doubles back to the group unannounced. I might be a little upset to say the least.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from clinchknot wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

He did dleurguin...the lawyer who got shot, left the walking group, and head off down into a depression. He came up just as the low flying birds headed towards him, and the VP swung, and shot. I think that added risk takes place when all of those guys in South Dakota spread out, and through field, and then have blockers at the end. There is a point where they have to stop, and can't appraoch the blockers anymore, but just the fact that somebody has trouble walking where they are, and falling back while others proceed ahead....doesn't seem like lines of guys could always be kept straight, but your point about angles is well taken also. I just heard a gal tell the sports at her hunting club in S. Dakota..."no one shoots unless they see bird, and sky behind the bird. No low shooting." Makes sense.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Half-of-two wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

@Jerry A Yep, "Next year is our year!" has been our rally-cry for as long as I've been alive! Just one of the many joys that go along with being a Cubs fan! To be honest, I'm suprised that it took as long as it did for someone to get a dig in! Kudos for being the first!

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Jan J. Mudder wrote 1 year 18 weeks ago

If you've ever been able to go hunting pheasants in South Dakota with South Dakotans, there's usually a typical pattern that is followed. Everyone is supposed to walk in as straight of a line as possible (walkers); blockers are to stay on the ground, wearing orange, and preferably to the sides (corn fields) or at bottlenecks to low-lying areas (pheasants run to cover in cattails, etc.); nobody shoots at birds unless positively identified as a rooster, and it has cleared the top of the corn AND the horizon. Since the shot is usually 4-6 shot (often extended range), it carries far enough that it doesn't threaten blockers or walkers by coming back down onto them.

I've hunted with a lot of people, and it never ceased to amaze me how hard it was for newbies to follow those fairly straight-forward instructions. It burned my bottom when some guy who was really important back in wherever didn't think that he needed to follow the above rules. I've seen teenaged boys call millionaires "moron," "idiot," or worse for not being able to hunt safely or retrieve his game, and I've seen quiet, burly farmers back up the boy if the guy in the wrong couldn't admit the mistake or accept the correction.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from clinchknot wrote 1 year 18 weeks ago

I can visualize ANY newbie!..Anyone that was highly driven to shoot a rooster that had never shot many roosters violate a short speech on "the rules". They become secondary when that rattling of corn, and the KA-KA-KA of a rooster sounds off! And if you are at a trap club that has sporting clays, a trap range, skeet range, any range where shot can travel towards another range has to be 300 yrds away, and the biggest shot they shoot is 7 1/2 shot! That is state law in most states. Not much damage could be done at that range for sure, but maybe damage to someone's eyes at say half that distance. In the heat of the moment, I can see rules getting violated. I don't care to hunt in those type situations with so many other gunners around.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Pathfinder1 wrote 1 year 18 weeks ago

Hi...

Certainly an interesting 'incident'.

Hopefully, there is something to be learned from it. Since I wasn't there, and details are sketchy, I can't conclude, but I can make (I hope) relevant suggestions.

Blaze orange was 'invented' for a reason...so why not wear it...!!

ALWAYS be sure of your target and the background behind it. We've already had at least two deer hunters killed while hunting with their buddys here in NY this deer season.

If fellow hunters are supposed to be walking in a (more- or-less) straight line, why in the world would you want to walk in front of it...??

Yes, Hunter Training courses are very helpful...and, perhaps, refresher courses should be held periodically.

Re: the "plagiarized" posts...I thought that it was rather 'unique' that two identical posts could show under two different authors...!! I guess someone thinks that they're pulling a prank on us.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from clinchknot wrote 1 year 18 weeks ago

Just to comment on several of your points I find erroneous. You don't walk in a straight line because you CAN'T! You are watching a dog work. Your eyes are ahead ready for a flushing rooster. Your boot becomes untied, and you stoop to tie it. Do you think the other 9 guys in the row immediately stop walking? One person has something difficult to get around, another easy walking etc., etc. And you can't always be sure of your background. If that were the case, and in my opinion of course, NO RUNNING shots at game would be ever taken. And in my opinion license holders would have to be a whole lot more savvy then the general public at large, and they aren't.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Jan J. Mudder wrote 1 year 7 weeks ago

Clinchknot, yes, you can, and you should walk in a straight line, and it's not that complicated ... depending on the terrain. I highly doubt that anyone here has more pheasant hunting experience in SD (unless the other South Dakotans are reading this), and I'm telling you: This is an expected norm. Yes, if you're hunting in the woods or covering rough and uneven ground, I'm sure that it would be difficult.... Have you ever been pheasant hunting in South Dakota? Trees are so sparse in the western part of the state that you could name them. "Uneven ground" means that there's a butte on the horizon. If you have to tie your shoes, that's fine, just don't shoot until you catch up, again. If you can't keep up, you should probably be a blocker.

The biggest danger is usually one of three scenarios that I've seen: newbies (usually fathers make their kids walk beside them for a few seasons for a reason, but wealthy adults are more difficult to deal with); people who can't resist ground-pounding a rooster; blockers who sit on a knoll or something similar (hay bales, etc.) to see better, but place themselves above the horizon of the walkers.

I've seen people get "shot," and, yes, a guy could lose an eye in the right (i.e. "wrong") circumstances. Always wear safety glasses, and always face the direction of the shooters. At worst in a typical situation, when a mistake happens, it's pretty much equivalent to a BB gun. I've seen three guys get hit, and two dogs; all 3 guys got a single BB as a blocker because they were sitting higher than the horizon AND a shooter shot at a low-flying rooster--2 of the 3 drew a droplet of blood, and the third had a BB-sized mark. Both dogs were hurt badly, and both times it was because an idiot tried to ground-pound a pheasant that the dog was flushing.

If you don't have enough self-control to do what I described, please, go hunt by yourself in open country, or go hunt in another state.

0 Good Comment? | | Report

Post a Comment

from rock rat wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

I liked the Rick Cheney one better. Drunk politicians and guns, what could go wrong?

Filter didn't like VP Cheney's first name. If the shoe fits I say.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from buckhunter wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

If you really want a good laugh. Check out ESPN.com's article on this subject. Their ignorance for all things involving guns really shines through.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Jerry A. wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

@Half-of-two: No offense, but haven't the Cubs been saying they'll get 'em next season for over a century? Of course, I'm a Cardsinals fan, so I have to get my digs in.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from kingofbirds wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

www.electroniceliquid.com
I almost always hunt alone so it's usually not an issue for me. However, I commonly hunt in among cattle and horses and haven't shot one yet. I'm never in that big a hurry, nor do I need to shoot something so badly that I hurry the shot. But I don't hunt quail either. Sounds like maybe that's not a bad idea!

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from dleurquin wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

Know your target and what's beyond. Mr. Yount needs to take a firearms safety class.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Sb Wacker wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

Hmm maybe those Blaze orange jackets aren't such a bad idea after all
SBW

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Half-of-two wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

@Jerry A Yep, "Next year is our year!" has been our rally-cry for as long as I've been alive! Just one of the many joys that go along with being a Cubs fan! To be honest, I'm suprised that it took as long as it did for someone to get a dig in! Kudos for being the first!

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Jan J. Mudder wrote 1 year 18 weeks ago

If you've ever been able to go hunting pheasants in South Dakota with South Dakotans, there's usually a typical pattern that is followed. Everyone is supposed to walk in as straight of a line as possible (walkers); blockers are to stay on the ground, wearing orange, and preferably to the sides (corn fields) or at bottlenecks to low-lying areas (pheasants run to cover in cattails, etc.); nobody shoots at birds unless positively identified as a rooster, and it has cleared the top of the corn AND the horizon. Since the shot is usually 4-6 shot (often extended range), it carries far enough that it doesn't threaten blockers or walkers by coming back down onto them.

I've hunted with a lot of people, and it never ceased to amaze me how hard it was for newbies to follow those fairly straight-forward instructions. It burned my bottom when some guy who was really important back in wherever didn't think that he needed to follow the above rules. I've seen teenaged boys call millionaires "moron," "idiot," or worse for not being able to hunt safely or retrieve his game, and I've seen quiet, burly farmers back up the boy if the guy in the wrong couldn't admit the mistake or accept the correction.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from TM wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

Key to hunting safely is to be 100 percent dead certain where fellow hunters are and pretty certain where the dogs are (dogs are shorter than people, get lost in the brush, and move around after the flush, so it's tough to be sure with dogs). Then, and only then, can you worry about the birds.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from TM wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

Key to hunting safely is to be 100 percent dead certain where fellow hunters are and pretty certain where the dogs are (dogs are shorter than people, get lost in the brush, and move around after the flush, so it's tough to be sure with dogs). Then, and only then, can you worry about the birds.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Half-of-two wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

Well, if it had been Sveum that shot Yount, I never would've believed it...the Cubs couldn't hit anything all year!

This, coming from a die-hard Cubs fan! We'll get 'em next season!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from clinchknot wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

How about if "X" Cubs manager, Lou Pinella, had been the one shot!? He would have returned fire, then gone over, and kicked Yount why he was down! We had him in Seattle. Quite a character Sweet Lou.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Ontario Honker ... wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

I almost always hunt alone so it's usually not an issue for me. However, I commonly hunt in among cattle and horses and haven't shot one yet. I'm never in that big a hurry, nor do I need to shoot something so badly that I hurry the shot. But I don't hunt quail either. Sounds like maybe that's not a bad idea!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from clinchknot wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

I think everyone can perceive a situation where that could happen. I think of it from time to time. Say you are hunting with a buddy you KNOW is off to your left. On your right some 30 yds say, is a depression area, say a slew that has a higher bank, visualize it having bushes on the bank top. Birds flush to your right headed that way, you swing, but another hunter has just popped up on the bank top, and between some bushes. You don't swing and fire making sure first you check out that area visually? I can see someone swinging, and firing, and THEN realizing someone has just popped up over the bank. Maybe he's even behind a bush. More than likely doesn't kill the guy, but I can see him getting hit in this unusual circumstance. That is why I don't rifle hunt. Guys shoot at running game. They can't focus on the target animal, and know what is in the animals periphery in a lot of wooded situations.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Ontario Honker ... wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

So now the spammers are set up to plagiarize our posts? Sorry, but I don't feel honored. Jackasses!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from dleurquin wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

Clinch, I agree with you. There are scenarios where it could happen to the "safest" of hunters out there and your scenario is a good example. However, if everybody in your group, for instance, is walking a line and trying to keep that line straight through visual and verbal cues (in other words, no one is getting ahead of anyone else), AND if you don't shoot beyond a 30 degree angle in front/back of you if you're in the middle. Obviously those angles increase if you're on the ends/corners of this hunting line.

Somebody mentioned the V.P.'s shooting incident. I heard the guy who got pelted by the V.P., left the hunting group in the middle of the hunt, then walked back to join the hunting party without making contact beforehand. If that's the case, then both the guy who got shot and the V.P. share in the responsibility of that goof up. I would lay a lot of heat on the guy who leaves my hunting party, then doubles back to the group unannounced. I might be a little upset to say the least.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from clinchknot wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

He did dleurguin...the lawyer who got shot, left the walking group, and head off down into a depression. He came up just as the low flying birds headed towards him, and the VP swung, and shot. I think that added risk takes place when all of those guys in South Dakota spread out, and through field, and then have blockers at the end. There is a point where they have to stop, and can't appraoch the blockers anymore, but just the fact that somebody has trouble walking where they are, and falling back while others proceed ahead....doesn't seem like lines of guys could always be kept straight, but your point about angles is well taken also. I just heard a gal tell the sports at her hunting club in S. Dakota..."no one shoots unless they see bird, and sky behind the bird. No low shooting." Makes sense.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from clinchknot wrote 1 year 18 weeks ago

I can visualize ANY newbie!..Anyone that was highly driven to shoot a rooster that had never shot many roosters violate a short speech on "the rules". They become secondary when that rattling of corn, and the KA-KA-KA of a rooster sounds off! And if you are at a trap club that has sporting clays, a trap range, skeet range, any range where shot can travel towards another range has to be 300 yrds away, and the biggest shot they shoot is 7 1/2 shot! That is state law in most states. Not much damage could be done at that range for sure, but maybe damage to someone's eyes at say half that distance. In the heat of the moment, I can see rules getting violated. I don't care to hunt in those type situations with so many other gunners around.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Pathfinder1 wrote 1 year 18 weeks ago

Hi...

Certainly an interesting 'incident'.

Hopefully, there is something to be learned from it. Since I wasn't there, and details are sketchy, I can't conclude, but I can make (I hope) relevant suggestions.

Blaze orange was 'invented' for a reason...so why not wear it...!!

ALWAYS be sure of your target and the background behind it. We've already had at least two deer hunters killed while hunting with their buddys here in NY this deer season.

If fellow hunters are supposed to be walking in a (more- or-less) straight line, why in the world would you want to walk in front of it...??

Yes, Hunter Training courses are very helpful...and, perhaps, refresher courses should be held periodically.

Re: the "plagiarized" posts...I thought that it was rather 'unique' that two identical posts could show under two different authors...!! I guess someone thinks that they're pulling a prank on us.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from clinchknot wrote 1 year 18 weeks ago

Just to comment on several of your points I find erroneous. You don't walk in a straight line because you CAN'T! You are watching a dog work. Your eyes are ahead ready for a flushing rooster. Your boot becomes untied, and you stoop to tie it. Do you think the other 9 guys in the row immediately stop walking? One person has something difficult to get around, another easy walking etc., etc. And you can't always be sure of your background. If that were the case, and in my opinion of course, NO RUNNING shots at game would be ever taken. And in my opinion license holders would have to be a whole lot more savvy then the general public at large, and they aren't.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Jan J. Mudder wrote 1 year 7 weeks ago

Clinchknot, yes, you can, and you should walk in a straight line, and it's not that complicated ... depending on the terrain. I highly doubt that anyone here has more pheasant hunting experience in SD (unless the other South Dakotans are reading this), and I'm telling you: This is an expected norm. Yes, if you're hunting in the woods or covering rough and uneven ground, I'm sure that it would be difficult.... Have you ever been pheasant hunting in South Dakota? Trees are so sparse in the western part of the state that you could name them. "Uneven ground" means that there's a butte on the horizon. If you have to tie your shoes, that's fine, just don't shoot until you catch up, again. If you can't keep up, you should probably be a blocker.

The biggest danger is usually one of three scenarios that I've seen: newbies (usually fathers make their kids walk beside them for a few seasons for a reason, but wealthy adults are more difficult to deal with); people who can't resist ground-pounding a rooster; blockers who sit on a knoll or something similar (hay bales, etc.) to see better, but place themselves above the horizon of the walkers.

I've seen people get "shot," and, yes, a guy could lose an eye in the right (i.e. "wrong") circumstances. Always wear safety glasses, and always face the direction of the shooters. At worst in a typical situation, when a mistake happens, it's pretty much equivalent to a BB gun. I've seen three guys get hit, and two dogs; all 3 guys got a single BB as a blocker because they were sitting higher than the horizon AND a shooter shot at a low-flying rooster--2 of the 3 drew a droplet of blood, and the third had a BB-sized mark. Both dogs were hurt badly, and both times it was because an idiot tried to ground-pound a pheasant that the dog was flushing.

If you don't have enough self-control to do what I described, please, go hunt by yourself in open country, or go hunt in another state.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from clinchknot wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

I would question Mr. VP's ignorance. The guy is an avid sportsman. And he is a very good fly angler. I always dreamed about taking him down my river that is his favorite river to flyfish. The baggage that would go along with it would not make the float very fun however. He also owns fine shotguns, and luvs his 28ga. O/U I have read. He got attacked vigorously by the left, and the comment that attached drunkedness to the hunting accident fell in line with one of those false attacks.

-1 Good Comment? | | Report
from hermit crab wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

Agree with buckhunter. Seems like he fancies himself quite the marksman, hunting quail with a revolver...

"Sveum was hit in the back of the right ear by the spray pattern from a six-shot."

-1 Good Comment? | | Report

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