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NH Man Gored by Downed Buck Says He's Done With Hunting

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December 03, 2012

NH Man Gored by Downed Buck Says He's Done With Hunting

By Chad Love

There's an old reporter's adage about story sources that goes thusly, "trust, but verify." It's also a damn useful refrain for life, romance and, oh, yes, the deer woods. Especially the next time you kneel down to pat the deer you've just shot and thank it for giving its life to you, because possession of said life might not yet, in point of fact, been fully transferred...

From this story on New Hampshire's unionleader.com:
Everett Gray said he plans to retire from deer hunting after being gored by an eight-point buck he shot with his .257 Roberts rifle. "My brother gave me that rifle," Gray said Sunday. "I shot my first deer with it, and I just shot my last." Gray said he was on his property Thursday night, talking to a neighbor. He spotted a deer and decided to grab his rifle and see if he could get a shot."I found a good spot to sit, and I sat there and waited," said Gray, who is in his 50s.

According to the story, Gray shot the deer, followed it, and found it piled up dead a short distance away. He then walked up to the dead deer, knelt, patted the buck on the head and thanked it for giving its life to him. This apparently annoyed the buck, which rose, Lazarus-like, and charged Gray, who ended up with four inches of horn in his side. Gray managed to walk out of the woods on his own and get to a nearby hospital, where he was treated and released. The buck managed to eventually die and sign over, albeit unwillingly, his pink slip to Gray, who says he's had enough and is retiring from deer hunting.

Comments (24)

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from MaxPower wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

What a wimp, he's got a great campfire story and is quitting the game. Should've verified Everett.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from bruisedsausage wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

Yeah, no kidding, I think that's pathetic. Guess he should have given it the ol nudge to make sure before kneeling down right in front of it. Lesson learned I suppose.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from buckhunter wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

I think I know where you can pick up a .257 Roberts, cheap.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from natureonthefly wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

best part of this article is that goofy picture... though he has quit hunting, he did manage his first bare skin shot in a major publication...

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from jay wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

That must be a new look, go shirtless but wear an unzipped winter coat around. Fashion trends seem to start on the coasts and work their way inward. Hopefully we will be spared for a year or two here in the midwest.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from vtbluegrass wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

I could get off his back for the Lee Greenwood style photo opp if it was to show off the battle scar from the deer. But that pic its just creepy. Poor reason to quit. After being gored I might increase efforts. If nothing else unless someone survived a grizzly attack in your group of friends you have the best hunting story.

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from capt.seagull wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

come on guys he is a 60 year old man if you were in his shoes you'd feel the same way.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from jaukulele wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

Now that I've finished laughing, I can say that I don't blame him. Even though he's quitting, he still has the story. Lesson learned..."trust, but verify."

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from benjaminwc wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

Out West we call that a scrath.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Ga hunter wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

I always nudge my deer once or twice and check if the deer is breathing or not before I bend down and touch it. I guess accidents do happen though. I wish he would consider being a bit more careful next time rather than quitting all together.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Whitetail98 wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

Hey can I have the .257, the rack, the meat and anything else you're too wimpy to use or deserve. Be glad you didn't die or get seriously injured. Besides that type of thing is what hunting is all about, obviously you thought hunting was a "walk in the park" with everything being simple and perfect. I wouldn't even give you the satisfaction of calling you a hunter. I know you're in your 50s but God man GROW UP!!!

p.s.- I hope you feel better......;)

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from ITHACASXS wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

I'm not going to pick on him, he might change his mind after the first bite of fried backstrap. If he doesn't, I would take his .257 Roberts off his hands. I like that caliber.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Bioguy01 wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

In my line of work, wrestling unsedated bucks is just another day at the office, and being gored is an occupational hazard that we accept but try to avoid. First rule of deer wrestling...always approach from behind.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Happy Myles wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

How can he retire, he has never started.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Ontario Honker ... wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

The guy is definitely a grand-stander. Not sure I believe any of it even if he had a hole in him.

Lesson here is always make sure the buck is dead. I will carefully touch their eye with the end of the barrel while standing behind the animal's head. If they blink, better put the knife away. That test probably saved someone from injury this past season. My friend's son shot a buck (see the story I posted in Answers about "When is it okay for bird dogs to chase deer?") and he got out his knife when he approached it. I stopped him, took his rifle, and did the eyeball test. That buck blinked. Traded him for the knife, stepped on the buck's antler and cut it's throat. I could tell it didn't have enough life left to warrant putting another hole in it (and I really had more faith in the knife than I did his crappy SKS!). Still, I don't recommend someone who doesn't know what their doing attempt cutting the throat of a live deer. Another story: my dad put down a very large buck back in 1971 (photo of us with our deer is in my profile collection). He shot it in the neck and it dropped like a stone. Dad was turning around the truck while Doug and I went to drag it down the hill. I reached down and grabbed an antler when that old boy sprang to life and flipped me. Fortunately, Doug brought along his gun and he dispatched it in a flash. Ever since then I have been a firm advocate of the eyeball test.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Ontario Honker ... wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

And enough of this talk about wimpy sixty year-old men. Any of you youngsters can come hunting with me and I'll make you wonder if your legs aren't two feet long and your lungs no bigger than gum wrappers.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from E_Blair wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

The guy should retire. He just does not seem too sharp. A well known blood tracker went one on one with a whitetail and got pretty beat up. He was tracking with a dachshund and had a scoped handgun to put down the deer. Well, it was not dead either. That did not work too well. Now if he had a big caliber revolver, it would have been better for him. He was also close to 70. He considers tracking hunting, but he was not good on the draw apparently.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Pathfinder1 wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

Hi...

And I thought that everyone knew about the "eyeball" test for big and/or dangerous game...!!

But, I guess not...until now, that is.

Thanks...to you guys who mentioned it.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from steve182 wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

Now we know why those guys in the videos jab the deer in the gut several times before celebrating.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from joejv4 wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

I sat through the NYS Hunter Safety Course when my son took it a couple years ago (they cove a lot more now than they did back when I took mine), and the eyeball test is taught as part of the course. They teach to use a broken branch, not your gun-if "bucky" jumps up when you touch his eye, it's not really safe to have him knocking the barrel of your gun every which way.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from T-max wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

Hey, Capt. Seagull, I'm well north of 60 and in the very unlikely circumstance of having an experience such as this no way in he#% would I quit hunting. Age is just a number, attitude rules the day! See you in the field.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from JohnR wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

It looks like Mr. Gray is wearing sweatpants too albeit with a possible camoflauge coloring. What was he talking to his neighbor about half naked?
Hmmm! Was the neighbor male or female? So many questions. I too am a firm believer in the eyeball test. I do however wear more clothes when hunting.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from 1ojolsen wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

The buck was just checking to see if Everett was dead

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from HmmAnd wrote 1 year 18 weeks ago

He should stop hunting, he had a responsibility to see that animal is actually dead once he shot it. He got careless and careless people often wind up injured or dead. The deer you see in my picture was shot by a 12 gauge at about 20 yards, he ran underneath my stand and hit the ground 10 yards away. I watched him lie there for a full five minutes - even using my binoculars making sure I didn't see any evidence of life. When I did approach the carcass it was with a round loaded finger ready to switch off the safety and shoot. I didn't pat him on the head I approached his back and nudged he body several times.
I know some that will put a "safety" shot into any potentially dangerous game animal they have downed from 20 yards before even coming close to the carcass.

0 Good Comment? | | Report

Post a Comment

from buckhunter wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

I think I know where you can pick up a .257 Roberts, cheap.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from natureonthefly wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

best part of this article is that goofy picture... though he has quit hunting, he did manage his first bare skin shot in a major publication...

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from benjaminwc wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

Out West we call that a scrath.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from MaxPower wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

What a wimp, he's got a great campfire story and is quitting the game. Should've verified Everett.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from jay wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

That must be a new look, go shirtless but wear an unzipped winter coat around. Fashion trends seem to start on the coasts and work their way inward. Hopefully we will be spared for a year or two here in the midwest.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Ontario Honker ... wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

The guy is definitely a grand-stander. Not sure I believe any of it even if he had a hole in him.

Lesson here is always make sure the buck is dead. I will carefully touch their eye with the end of the barrel while standing behind the animal's head. If they blink, better put the knife away. That test probably saved someone from injury this past season. My friend's son shot a buck (see the story I posted in Answers about "When is it okay for bird dogs to chase deer?") and he got out his knife when he approached it. I stopped him, took his rifle, and did the eyeball test. That buck blinked. Traded him for the knife, stepped on the buck's antler and cut it's throat. I could tell it didn't have enough life left to warrant putting another hole in it (and I really had more faith in the knife than I did his crappy SKS!). Still, I don't recommend someone who doesn't know what their doing attempt cutting the throat of a live deer. Another story: my dad put down a very large buck back in 1971 (photo of us with our deer is in my profile collection). He shot it in the neck and it dropped like a stone. Dad was turning around the truck while Doug and I went to drag it down the hill. I reached down and grabbed an antler when that old boy sprang to life and flipped me. Fortunately, Doug brought along his gun and he dispatched it in a flash. Ever since then I have been a firm advocate of the eyeball test.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Ontario Honker ... wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

And enough of this talk about wimpy sixty year-old men. Any of you youngsters can come hunting with me and I'll make you wonder if your legs aren't two feet long and your lungs no bigger than gum wrappers.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Pathfinder1 wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

Hi...

And I thought that everyone knew about the "eyeball" test for big and/or dangerous game...!!

But, I guess not...until now, that is.

Thanks...to you guys who mentioned it.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from bruisedsausage wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

Yeah, no kidding, I think that's pathetic. Guess he should have given it the ol nudge to make sure before kneeling down right in front of it. Lesson learned I suppose.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from vtbluegrass wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

I could get off his back for the Lee Greenwood style photo opp if it was to show off the battle scar from the deer. But that pic its just creepy. Poor reason to quit. After being gored I might increase efforts. If nothing else unless someone survived a grizzly attack in your group of friends you have the best hunting story.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from capt.seagull wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

come on guys he is a 60 year old man if you were in his shoes you'd feel the same way.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from jaukulele wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

Now that I've finished laughing, I can say that I don't blame him. Even though he's quitting, he still has the story. Lesson learned..."trust, but verify."

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Ga hunter wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

I always nudge my deer once or twice and check if the deer is breathing or not before I bend down and touch it. I guess accidents do happen though. I wish he would consider being a bit more careful next time rather than quitting all together.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Whitetail98 wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

Hey can I have the .257, the rack, the meat and anything else you're too wimpy to use or deserve. Be glad you didn't die or get seriously injured. Besides that type of thing is what hunting is all about, obviously you thought hunting was a "walk in the park" with everything being simple and perfect. I wouldn't even give you the satisfaction of calling you a hunter. I know you're in your 50s but God man GROW UP!!!

p.s.- I hope you feel better......;)

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from ITHACASXS wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

I'm not going to pick on him, he might change his mind after the first bite of fried backstrap. If he doesn't, I would take his .257 Roberts off his hands. I like that caliber.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Bioguy01 wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

In my line of work, wrestling unsedated bucks is just another day at the office, and being gored is an occupational hazard that we accept but try to avoid. First rule of deer wrestling...always approach from behind.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Happy Myles wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

How can he retire, he has never started.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from E_Blair wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

The guy should retire. He just does not seem too sharp. A well known blood tracker went one on one with a whitetail and got pretty beat up. He was tracking with a dachshund and had a scoped handgun to put down the deer. Well, it was not dead either. That did not work too well. Now if he had a big caliber revolver, it would have been better for him. He was also close to 70. He considers tracking hunting, but he was not good on the draw apparently.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from steve182 wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

Now we know why those guys in the videos jab the deer in the gut several times before celebrating.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from joejv4 wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

I sat through the NYS Hunter Safety Course when my son took it a couple years ago (they cove a lot more now than they did back when I took mine), and the eyeball test is taught as part of the course. They teach to use a broken branch, not your gun-if "bucky" jumps up when you touch his eye, it's not really safe to have him knocking the barrel of your gun every which way.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from T-max wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

Hey, Capt. Seagull, I'm well north of 60 and in the very unlikely circumstance of having an experience such as this no way in he#% would I quit hunting. Age is just a number, attitude rules the day! See you in the field.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from JohnR wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

It looks like Mr. Gray is wearing sweatpants too albeit with a possible camoflauge coloring. What was he talking to his neighbor about half naked?
Hmmm! Was the neighbor male or female? So many questions. I too am a firm believer in the eyeball test. I do however wear more clothes when hunting.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from 1ojolsen wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

The buck was just checking to see if Everett was dead

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from HmmAnd wrote 1 year 18 weeks ago

He should stop hunting, he had a responsibility to see that animal is actually dead once he shot it. He got careless and careless people often wind up injured or dead. The deer you see in my picture was shot by a 12 gauge at about 20 yards, he ran underneath my stand and hit the ground 10 yards away. I watched him lie there for a full five minutes - even using my binoculars making sure I didn't see any evidence of life. When I did approach the carcass it was with a round loaded finger ready to switch off the safety and shoot. I didn't pat him on the head I approached his back and nudged he body several times.
I know some that will put a "safety" shot into any potentially dangerous game animal they have downed from 20 yards before even coming close to the carcass.

0 Good Comment? | | Report

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