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Judge OKs Use of Dogs in Wisconsin Wolf Hunt

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January 07, 2013

Judge OKs Use of Dogs in Wisconsin Wolf Hunt

By Chad Love


A judge has cleared the way for wolf hunters to use dogs during the Wisconsin wolf season, making it the only state that currently allows it.

From this story on jsonline.com:
A Dane County judge said Friday the Department of Natural Resources had failed to enact adequate restrictions for dogs used to track or trail wolves, thereby prohibiting the practice under current state law. However, Judge Peter Anderson's ruling would allow dogs to hunt wolves.

According to the story, the judge dissolved a temporary injunction issued last year that prohibited hunting wolves with dogs, but the judge's ruling also prohibited the training of dogs to hunt wolves. So apparently you can hunt wolves with dogs in Wisconsin, but you can't train dogs to hunt wolves in Wisconsin, because there's no safe (for the dogs) way to do it. Wisconsin first authorized a wolf hunt last year, and the legislation as written, allowed hunters to use dogs to track wolves, but the controversial rule has been embroiled in legal challenges from the beginning.

Should hunters be able to use dogs to track wolves? Any Wisconsin hunters out there who can shed light on the issue?

Comments (8)

Top Rated
All Comments
from Ontario Honker ... wrote 1 year 14 weeks ago

Out in Montana a lot of sheep men have gone to using Greater Pyrenees dogs to take care of the coyotes bothering their stock. These dogs do more than just scare off coyotes, they are experts at luring the coyotes (ranchers usually work the dogs in pairs) and destroying them. There have been some problems though. Not infrequently they will suddenly take to killing sheep themselves. And you DO NOT want to be hunting with your dogs anywhere in the neighborhood of these killers. They will seem sublime and friendly until it's too late.

I do see a possible problem with safely training and maintaining these kinds of dogs, especially in a fairly congested state like Wisconsin. Ontario has in fact finally outright banned certain breeds of dogs for that reason (particularly pit bulls). The public is always going to view with great skepticism and a certain justifiable degree of concern situations where dogs are trained to chase and kill other dogs. Sounds like the judge was trying to err on the side of caution ... for at least the time being. This whole wolf hunting thing has proceeded at a pretty fast pace and I for one do not disagree with thinking things through a bit more thoroughly first.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from baconboy206 wrote 1 year 14 weeks ago

im no dog expert but i do have experience with wolves, and i have yet to come across a dog that i think would stand a chance against a full grown wolf, let alone a pack.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Logan88 wrote 1 year 14 weeks ago

The dog hunters wouldn't have had a whole lot to do this year anyway because most utilize snow to cut a track at a bait station similar to they way they hunt coyotes, then they drop the tailgate and turn loose the hounds. Most of the zones already had reached their quotas by the time there was sufficient snow.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Ontario Honker ... wrote 1 year 14 weeks ago

Baconboy, have you ever seen an Irish wolfhound? Check it out. Those dogs are huge and they were bred to run down wolves. They are supposedly a pretty-mild mannered dog these days but apparently the instinct to chase is still strong in them. We are both wrong in assuming that these special sighthound breeds (including Irish wolfhound and the borzoi) attack and kill their wolf prey. Rather they have been bred to literally run their prey to exhaustion and then pin it down until their owners can catch up and dispatch the animal. The dense forests of Wisconsin hardly resemble the Russian steppes and I'm not sure sighthound breeds would work well. Sounds like it would be a much more productive endeavor in the vicinity of Yellowstone Park. Be interesting to see how this plays out.

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from intelwildlife wrote 1 year 14 weeks ago

I am all for hunting wolves. But this is going to be a PR nightmare for hunters, the second a dog limps into some town bloody and mauled with its guts hanging out somebody will snap a pic. and it will be all over the news. And there will be a public outcry to stop hunting wolves. Why allow this? Stupid, stupid idea.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from wisc14 wrote 1 year 14 weeks ago

exactly. stupid idea. however the hunting regs for wolves were written largely by politicians in our state, not by wildlife biologists or people who actually hunt

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from yanzi wrote 1 year 14 weeks ago

Single-minded is the most gentle force of this worl.. www.lilydating.com

-1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Rgw3 wrote 1 year 14 weeks ago

Man has been hunting with dogs for almost as long as he has been hunting. Many breeds of dogs (e.g. blue lacy) need to hunt or else they become "antsy". These are stupid rules.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report

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from Logan88 wrote 1 year 14 weeks ago

The dog hunters wouldn't have had a whole lot to do this year anyway because most utilize snow to cut a track at a bait station similar to they way they hunt coyotes, then they drop the tailgate and turn loose the hounds. Most of the zones already had reached their quotas by the time there was sufficient snow.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Rgw3 wrote 1 year 14 weeks ago

Man has been hunting with dogs for almost as long as he has been hunting. Many breeds of dogs (e.g. blue lacy) need to hunt or else they become "antsy". These are stupid rules.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Ontario Honker ... wrote 1 year 14 weeks ago

Out in Montana a lot of sheep men have gone to using Greater Pyrenees dogs to take care of the coyotes bothering their stock. These dogs do more than just scare off coyotes, they are experts at luring the coyotes (ranchers usually work the dogs in pairs) and destroying them. There have been some problems though. Not infrequently they will suddenly take to killing sheep themselves. And you DO NOT want to be hunting with your dogs anywhere in the neighborhood of these killers. They will seem sublime and friendly until it's too late.

I do see a possible problem with safely training and maintaining these kinds of dogs, especially in a fairly congested state like Wisconsin. Ontario has in fact finally outright banned certain breeds of dogs for that reason (particularly pit bulls). The public is always going to view with great skepticism and a certain justifiable degree of concern situations where dogs are trained to chase and kill other dogs. Sounds like the judge was trying to err on the side of caution ... for at least the time being. This whole wolf hunting thing has proceeded at a pretty fast pace and I for one do not disagree with thinking things through a bit more thoroughly first.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from baconboy206 wrote 1 year 14 weeks ago

im no dog expert but i do have experience with wolves, and i have yet to come across a dog that i think would stand a chance against a full grown wolf, let alone a pack.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Ontario Honker ... wrote 1 year 14 weeks ago

Baconboy, have you ever seen an Irish wolfhound? Check it out. Those dogs are huge and they were bred to run down wolves. They are supposedly a pretty-mild mannered dog these days but apparently the instinct to chase is still strong in them. We are both wrong in assuming that these special sighthound breeds (including Irish wolfhound and the borzoi) attack and kill their wolf prey. Rather they have been bred to literally run their prey to exhaustion and then pin it down until their owners can catch up and dispatch the animal. The dense forests of Wisconsin hardly resemble the Russian steppes and I'm not sure sighthound breeds would work well. Sounds like it would be a much more productive endeavor in the vicinity of Yellowstone Park. Be interesting to see how this plays out.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from intelwildlife wrote 1 year 14 weeks ago

I am all for hunting wolves. But this is going to be a PR nightmare for hunters, the second a dog limps into some town bloody and mauled with its guts hanging out somebody will snap a pic. and it will be all over the news. And there will be a public outcry to stop hunting wolves. Why allow this? Stupid, stupid idea.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from wisc14 wrote 1 year 14 weeks ago

exactly. stupid idea. however the hunting regs for wolves were written largely by politicians in our state, not by wildlife biologists or people who actually hunt

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from yanzi wrote 1 year 14 weeks ago

Single-minded is the most gentle force of this worl.. www.lilydating.com

-1 Good Comment? | | Report

Post a Comment

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