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Virginia Governor to Sign Sunday Hunting Bill

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February 20, 2014

Virginia Governor to Sign Sunday Hunting Bill

By Phil Bourjaily

Supporters of Sunday hunting in Virginia have won their long fight. A bill to allow hunting on Sundays has passed out of the Senate and awaits Governor Terry McAuliffe’s signature. The new law applies only to hunters with written permission on private property. Public lands remain closed under the old law, although waterfowl hunting will be allowed over public waters such as the Chesapeake Bay.

Surprisingly, as the Washington Post reported, support for the bill in Virginia’s house was overwhelming, with many of the supporters coming from urban and suburban northern Virginia, while most opposition to the bill came from conservative rural districts.

“We’re pushing God to the side,” said Thomas Wright (R-Lunenberg), himself a hunter who opposed the bill.

“Now Sundays are like almost any other day of the week,” he said. “Has it really helped our culture? Has it really helped our morals? The more we chip away at Sunday being the Lord’s Day, the worse it is for our country.”

Delegate Mark Sickles (D-Fairfax) said many of his suburban constituents, who have to travel to hunt and can’t make weekend hunting trips under the current ban, contacted him to voice support for the new law.

The bill awaits Governor McAuliffe’s signature. McAuliffe, who goes on an annual hunting trip to the Eastern Shore, has said he will sign the bill .

Comments (19)

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from aferraro wrote 8 weeks 8 min ago

Fundamentalist @ssholes trying to force other people to believe what they do- sounds JUST like the Sunday hunting debate we have in PA.

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from elkslayer wrote 8 weeks 7 min ago

I live in a state that has always allowed hunting on Sunday but I have never hunted on Sunday. I tend to agree with both sides of this issue, there is no legitimate reason to force a ban on hunting on Sunday, however I am concerned about the direction of our country's moral when so many people are willing to cast religion aside for the sake of another day to hunt. Again, I won't stand in the way and I don't feel I have the right to stop anyone from hunting on Sunday but I do feel that this is an indication of declining morals that is representative of the moral decline throughout the country.

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from MattM37 wrote 7 weeks 6 days ago

How is it casting religion aside? You can't go to church and go hunting in the same day? And as for the act of hunting itself: Isn't it a wholesome activity, enjoying nature, feeding yourself and your family with the best food the Lord provides?

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from asrenstrom wrote 7 weeks 6 days ago

I can see where the view of taking Sunday away from the Lord is disappointing from a view point, but I don't think a forced ban is right either. Especially since many people (myself included) enjoy the Lord's work more than any other time while in the woods or on the water. I haven't gone into a tree stand or ground blind once in the past 3 years without my bible. "I'd rather be hunting and thinking about God than in church thinking about hunting"

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from asrenstrom wrote 7 weeks 6 days ago

I can see where the view of taking Sunday away from the Lord is disappointing from a view point, but I don't think a forced ban is right either. Especially since many people (myself included) enjoy the Lord's work more than any other time while in the woods or on the water. I haven't gone into a tree stand or ground blind once in the past 3 years without my bible. "I'd rather be hunting and thinking about God than in church thinking about hunting"

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from fishguts1 wrote 7 weeks 6 days ago

elkslayer, of the top ten states with the highest church attendance, nine allow Sunday hunting. Those that do not allow Sunday hunting have some of the lowest church attendance rates. The two have nothing to do with each other.

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from Longrifle wrote 7 weeks 6 days ago

As I see it, the lack of Sunday hunting is a major factor in the poor recruitment rates of new hunters. Always a big consideration that has prevented me from purchasing a Maine non-resident license some years. Us working people don't get enough time off.

Why don't some of these politicians that support a ban push for shutting off the cable tv, or banning public sporting events on Sundays. Hypocrites.

Here in PA the farmers are the driving force against Sunday hunting for various reasons. I'm cool with that as long as they are not given crop damage depredation permits.

And yes, I am a church going man.

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from VAHunter540 wrote 7 weeks 6 days ago

I am very happy about this and agree with asrenstrom in that there are few places, besides a church, that I feel more closely connected with God. I don't expect it’s so for everyone and it doesn’t have to be. When you are sitting high on a mountain on a crisp clear fall day and you watch the sunrise creep across the valley below, illuminating all the fall colors and the warmth touching your face, that is as pretty of a picture as any stained glass window. I won’t hunt every Sunday just like I don’t make it to church every Sunday, life happens, but I make time no matter the day or where I am to acknowledge God.
I am youngish, 30, recently married, still “earning” my vacation days at the job. Kids are soon to be on the way. My weekends seem to always have something going on. One more day to be allowed to hunt is just one extra opportunity to hunt. It allows me the chance to spread myself out better amongst all my responsibilities and still find time to do the things I love. It’s one more opportunity to hunt with Dad, with friends, and share the experience of hunting with someone new.

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from vasportsman wrote 7 weeks 6 days ago

COULD NOT BE HAPPIER! I think it is more a property rights issue than a religion issue though, everyone wants to make it a religion issue, but the real driving force behind it was that Safari Club International was going to sue Virginia on constitutional grounds as a test case if it didn't pass this year, and the folks in Richmond finally caved. They figured out how to circumvent the "sub-committee of doom" that killed it every year and bang, come July we are free from the blue law! At least mostly...

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from Gtbigsky wrote 7 weeks 6 days ago

Why do I need a church to be close to God? Why In the world do I need to listen to a priest to be reminded of what God has provided for me and to be thankful for such things? The bible is a wonderful piece of literature that has great guide lines but it isn't the end all be all for giving thanks to God. I grew up a catholic, went to catholic church and a catholic school which ironically pushed me further away from organized religion than anything. It should be your choice, and if you are a child it should be your parents choice whether you attend church on sundays or to go hunting NOT THE GOVERNMENTS! Honestly, I get more spiritually out of being in the woods or on the water than in church. I am much more thankful in those situations than when I am singing hymns and listening to a preacher. If the reason hunting is banned on Sundays is to sacrifice something such as the sacrifice Christ made then why is it forced? If t was a sacrifice then it should be done on ones own merit. The sacrifice Christ made was of his own free will.
It is such a ridiculous rule and I'm glad to see some states are understanding that. Now, If only Pennsylvania would get their heads out of there rears.

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from vasportsman wrote 7 weeks 6 days ago

Oh, and here are some great reactions from some of the Sunday Hunting Ban supporters, makes you wonder how it didn't pass a long time ago;

"Sen. Emmett Hanger, R-Augusta County, argued in seeking an amendment that would allow counties to opt out, that in his neck of the woods in the Shenandoah Valley, mowing your lawn on a Sunday would elicit looks from neighbors."

Um, my mother still lives in Augusta County, and pretty sure nobody gives a hoot when you mow your yard...

The Patrick County Board of Supervisors decided to pass their own resolution unanimously saying that they wanted the right to opt out of Sunday hunting (which, of course, the DGIF is going to say, um, no) and in the same meeting also passed a resolution to demand extending the firearms deer season, saying "at night, if you drive, there's deer all along the sides of the road. I mean we've got to deal with this population problem in some way and we're hoping the state maybe will look at it and also come up with ways to extend the firearms season to decrease the population and make people a little safer."

Geniuses.

Delegate Matt Farris weighed in and stressed the importance of following the "12 Commandments and to honor the Sabbath."

Sometimes I wonder about the people we put in elected office...

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Sarge01 wrote 7 weeks 6 days ago

I live in a state where there is no Sunday hunting, except for a couple counties. Checking hunters for over 35 years the subject rarely came up. Most of our landowners have voiced their opinion and even if Sunday hunting is allowed most landowners are not going to allow Sunday hunting on their property anyway. The hunting club where I hunt is an example, the landowner says regardless there won't be any Sunday hunting on his property. We have 8 counties in our state that allow Sunday hunting on private property and the Officers tell me that the hunters can't find any place to hunt because of the private landowners objection to Sunday hunting.

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from wittsec wrote 7 weeks 6 days ago

What about religions that don't have Sunday as the sabbath? What about people that are able to hunt and go to church in the same day? What about the simple ability to be free to make your own choices on what you wish to do on Sunday without government forcing your decision?

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from DennyF wrote 7 weeks 5 days ago

The biggest problem we have in Pa is with political agendas and their manufactured support "enablers"

A good article:

Is There an Environmentally Extreme Agenda Behind H.U.S.H?

HUSH SUNDAY HUNTING LAWSUIT ALL ABOUT KILLING MORE DEER?

Exactly who is HUSH (short for Hunters United for Sunday Hunting). That is the question everyone is asking. That is what we have explored and the results are not quite fitting in with hushes claims that this is all about the future of hunting, constitutionality etc. Many believe they are just politically driven environmentalists as opposed to the "hunter advocates" they would like legislators and others to believe.

Lets take an in depth look at the 4 people who make up HUSH and their motives for doing so.

First, we start with Kathy Davis, the groups founder. A known enviroextreme type, Kathy has pushed and lobbied for legislation and regulation that would lower the states deer herd for years. The causes she has championed pretty much mirror those suggested by the audubon deer forum for things "needed" to further reduce the deer herd. She has also many environmental connections, and has voted for further herd reductions on a citizen advisory committee where she took part, even though the Pa Game Commission had a set goal of stabilization. She was voted down by the majority of the other participants on the committee, and her initiative failed. She had also had an interest in obtaining a PGC commissioner seat for unit 2A, but her attempt was quashed by concerned sportsmen voicing concerns over the proposed nominee. Ms. Davis has also alienated several legislators with her percieved extremism and dogged determination when it comes to her misguided lobbying efforts. There are also multiple pgc commissioners that have also said they have "tuned her out" for the same reasons. Some members of one of the larger sportsmen groups in the state, apparently confused by so much percieved extremism, have actually inquired about her being an ANTI-hunter.

Vern Ross, another of the hush members is, interestingly enough, the former executive director of the Pennsylvania Game Commission who was a driving force behind getting deer herd reduction into place. Vern will forever be looked back upon as one of the most controversial figures in Pa game management history for the role he played in forever changing Pa deer management under the Ridge administrations deer program.

Don Heckman, a very active participant when it came to weighing in on game issues, has consistently voiced strong support for the deer management plan and reductions. Taking a very extreme stance on the issue for years. A very adament supporter of the Pa Game Commission deer plan, as were some of his close nwtf colleagues. Mr. Heckman has certainly done some good things for wild turkey management in the state, and that should not go ignored in this brief summary.

Josh First. Mr. First has quite the lengthy list of environmentalist ties. He is also very active in the environmental arena, so much so, he was pointed to as being an environmental extremist by one of the states largest sportsmen groups who opposed his nomination when he tried to gain an appointment to the Pa game commissions board of commissioners. He has also worked at the Environmental Protection Agency, Dcnr (under Tom Ridge) is on the policy council of 10,000 friends of Pennsylvania and is coordinator for 'Pa Habitat Alliance' which is headed by the Audubon Society. His environmentalism resume is far too lengthy to list here, but much informtion is available online. Mr. First also made a failed attempt to gain the senatorial seat of Pa district 15 in 2012.

Many believe that these people are nothing more than very willing pawns in the "deer wars" and it certainly looks that this may indeed be the case. Sunday hunting would go a long way towards being able to harvest more deer, and thereby further what some are calling an "environmentally extreme" agenda.

It is our belief that the unsupportable deer herd reductions and resulting maleffects of extremely low hunter satisfaction and drop out is very damaging to our hunting heritage in Pennsylvania and it has gone on long enough.

* THE IS A PUBLIC ALERT COURTESY OF THE CONCERNED SPORTSMEN OF PENNSYLVANIA.*

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from DennyF wrote 7 weeks 5 days ago

By the way, you can find of the environmentalists here posting in this thread. See if you can figure out who.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from HeidelbergJaeger wrote 7 weeks 4 days ago

I applaud the commonwealth's decision to allow Sunday hunting. There is nothing wrong with it in my eyes. If you want to hunt, then go ahead, and if you so choose to honor your sabath, then that is fine as well. When as a religious fundamentalist (zealot) of any creed wish and seek to enforce your values on others, you have forgotten the principles that founded this country. Delegate Wright equates non-Christians with the moral demise of this country. He couldn't be further from the truth. There are many reasons he could have cited for what HE believes is the cause of moral decay, but he has no leg to stand on here. He should refer to the book he believes and read the passage about not judging others lest ye be judged.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from ITHACASXS wrote 7 weeks 3 days ago

My father never cared for some Sunday hunting(pheasant & deer with a shotgun was not allowed in NY for many years). He felt that the farmers and animals shouldn't be bombarded every day of the week. This was in a time when it was pretty easy to gain permission to hunt on private land and both pheasant and deer were the most popular and drew the most crowds(not at the same time of course). I don't hunt much on Sundays, it's a busy day when you come from and have a family of your own. I suppose if you would go on a picnic or some such thing after your Devotion (whatever it may be), there is no reason why you should not hunt either.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from westmichhunter wrote 3 weeks 2 days ago

Saturdays and sundays are the only days I get to hunt. you take away sunday and all I have is 4 days a month to hunt. im glad I live in Michigan.

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from westmichhunter wrote 3 weeks 2 days ago

Saturdays and sundays are the only days I get to hunt. you take away sunday and all I have is 4 days a month to hunt. im glad I live in Michigan.

0 Good Comment? | | Report

Post a Comment

from DennyF wrote 7 weeks 5 days ago

The biggest problem we have in Pa is with political agendas and their manufactured support "enablers"

A good article:

Is There an Environmentally Extreme Agenda Behind H.U.S.H?

HUSH SUNDAY HUNTING LAWSUIT ALL ABOUT KILLING MORE DEER?

Exactly who is HUSH (short for Hunters United for Sunday Hunting). That is the question everyone is asking. That is what we have explored and the results are not quite fitting in with hushes claims that this is all about the future of hunting, constitutionality etc. Many believe they are just politically driven environmentalists as opposed to the "hunter advocates" they would like legislators and others to believe.

Lets take an in depth look at the 4 people who make up HUSH and their motives for doing so.

First, we start with Kathy Davis, the groups founder. A known enviroextreme type, Kathy has pushed and lobbied for legislation and regulation that would lower the states deer herd for years. The causes she has championed pretty much mirror those suggested by the audubon deer forum for things "needed" to further reduce the deer herd. She has also many environmental connections, and has voted for further herd reductions on a citizen advisory committee where she took part, even though the Pa Game Commission had a set goal of stabilization. She was voted down by the majority of the other participants on the committee, and her initiative failed. She had also had an interest in obtaining a PGC commissioner seat for unit 2A, but her attempt was quashed by concerned sportsmen voicing concerns over the proposed nominee. Ms. Davis has also alienated several legislators with her percieved extremism and dogged determination when it comes to her misguided lobbying efforts. There are also multiple pgc commissioners that have also said they have "tuned her out" for the same reasons. Some members of one of the larger sportsmen groups in the state, apparently confused by so much percieved extremism, have actually inquired about her being an ANTI-hunter.

Vern Ross, another of the hush members is, interestingly enough, the former executive director of the Pennsylvania Game Commission who was a driving force behind getting deer herd reduction into place. Vern will forever be looked back upon as one of the most controversial figures in Pa game management history for the role he played in forever changing Pa deer management under the Ridge administrations deer program.

Don Heckman, a very active participant when it came to weighing in on game issues, has consistently voiced strong support for the deer management plan and reductions. Taking a very extreme stance on the issue for years. A very adament supporter of the Pa Game Commission deer plan, as were some of his close nwtf colleagues. Mr. Heckman has certainly done some good things for wild turkey management in the state, and that should not go ignored in this brief summary.

Josh First. Mr. First has quite the lengthy list of environmentalist ties. He is also very active in the environmental arena, so much so, he was pointed to as being an environmental extremist by one of the states largest sportsmen groups who opposed his nomination when he tried to gain an appointment to the Pa game commissions board of commissioners. He has also worked at the Environmental Protection Agency, Dcnr (under Tom Ridge) is on the policy council of 10,000 friends of Pennsylvania and is coordinator for 'Pa Habitat Alliance' which is headed by the Audubon Society. His environmentalism resume is far too lengthy to list here, but much informtion is available online. Mr. First also made a failed attempt to gain the senatorial seat of Pa district 15 in 2012.

Many believe that these people are nothing more than very willing pawns in the "deer wars" and it certainly looks that this may indeed be the case. Sunday hunting would go a long way towards being able to harvest more deer, and thereby further what some are calling an "environmentally extreme" agenda.

It is our belief that the unsupportable deer herd reductions and resulting maleffects of extremely low hunter satisfaction and drop out is very damaging to our hunting heritage in Pennsylvania and it has gone on long enough.

* THE IS A PUBLIC ALERT COURTESY OF THE CONCERNED SPORTSMEN OF PENNSYLVANIA.*

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from DennyF wrote 7 weeks 5 days ago

By the way, you can find of the environmentalists here posting in this thread. See if you can figure out who.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from MattM37 wrote 7 weeks 6 days ago

How is it casting religion aside? You can't go to church and go hunting in the same day? And as for the act of hunting itself: Isn't it a wholesome activity, enjoying nature, feeding yourself and your family with the best food the Lord provides?

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Gtbigsky wrote 7 weeks 6 days ago

Why do I need a church to be close to God? Why In the world do I need to listen to a priest to be reminded of what God has provided for me and to be thankful for such things? The bible is a wonderful piece of literature that has great guide lines but it isn't the end all be all for giving thanks to God. I grew up a catholic, went to catholic church and a catholic school which ironically pushed me further away from organized religion than anything. It should be your choice, and if you are a child it should be your parents choice whether you attend church on sundays or to go hunting NOT THE GOVERNMENTS! Honestly, I get more spiritually out of being in the woods or on the water than in church. I am much more thankful in those situations than when I am singing hymns and listening to a preacher. If the reason hunting is banned on Sundays is to sacrifice something such as the sacrifice Christ made then why is it forced? If t was a sacrifice then it should be done on ones own merit. The sacrifice Christ made was of his own free will.
It is such a ridiculous rule and I'm glad to see some states are understanding that. Now, If only Pennsylvania would get their heads out of there rears.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from vasportsman wrote 7 weeks 6 days ago

Oh, and here are some great reactions from some of the Sunday Hunting Ban supporters, makes you wonder how it didn't pass a long time ago;

"Sen. Emmett Hanger, R-Augusta County, argued in seeking an amendment that would allow counties to opt out, that in his neck of the woods in the Shenandoah Valley, mowing your lawn on a Sunday would elicit looks from neighbors."

Um, my mother still lives in Augusta County, and pretty sure nobody gives a hoot when you mow your yard...

The Patrick County Board of Supervisors decided to pass their own resolution unanimously saying that they wanted the right to opt out of Sunday hunting (which, of course, the DGIF is going to say, um, no) and in the same meeting also passed a resolution to demand extending the firearms deer season, saying "at night, if you drive, there's deer all along the sides of the road. I mean we've got to deal with this population problem in some way and we're hoping the state maybe will look at it and also come up with ways to extend the firearms season to decrease the population and make people a little safer."

Geniuses.

Delegate Matt Farris weighed in and stressed the importance of following the "12 Commandments and to honor the Sabbath."

Sometimes I wonder about the people we put in elected office...

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from wittsec wrote 7 weeks 6 days ago

What about religions that don't have Sunday as the sabbath? What about people that are able to hunt and go to church in the same day? What about the simple ability to be free to make your own choices on what you wish to do on Sunday without government forcing your decision?

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from HeidelbergJaeger wrote 7 weeks 4 days ago

I applaud the commonwealth's decision to allow Sunday hunting. There is nothing wrong with it in my eyes. If you want to hunt, then go ahead, and if you so choose to honor your sabath, then that is fine as well. When as a religious fundamentalist (zealot) of any creed wish and seek to enforce your values on others, you have forgotten the principles that founded this country. Delegate Wright equates non-Christians with the moral demise of this country. He couldn't be further from the truth. There are many reasons he could have cited for what HE believes is the cause of moral decay, but he has no leg to stand on here. He should refer to the book he believes and read the passage about not judging others lest ye be judged.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from ITHACASXS wrote 7 weeks 3 days ago

My father never cared for some Sunday hunting(pheasant & deer with a shotgun was not allowed in NY for many years). He felt that the farmers and animals shouldn't be bombarded every day of the week. This was in a time when it was pretty easy to gain permission to hunt on private land and both pheasant and deer were the most popular and drew the most crowds(not at the same time of course). I don't hunt much on Sundays, it's a busy day when you come from and have a family of your own. I suppose if you would go on a picnic or some such thing after your Devotion (whatever it may be), there is no reason why you should not hunt either.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from aferraro wrote 8 weeks 8 min ago

Fundamentalist @ssholes trying to force other people to believe what they do- sounds JUST like the Sunday hunting debate we have in PA.

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from elkslayer wrote 8 weeks 7 min ago

I live in a state that has always allowed hunting on Sunday but I have never hunted on Sunday. I tend to agree with both sides of this issue, there is no legitimate reason to force a ban on hunting on Sunday, however I am concerned about the direction of our country's moral when so many people are willing to cast religion aside for the sake of another day to hunt. Again, I won't stand in the way and I don't feel I have the right to stop anyone from hunting on Sunday but I do feel that this is an indication of declining morals that is representative of the moral decline throughout the country.

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from asrenstrom wrote 7 weeks 6 days ago

I can see where the view of taking Sunday away from the Lord is disappointing from a view point, but I don't think a forced ban is right either. Especially since many people (myself included) enjoy the Lord's work more than any other time while in the woods or on the water. I haven't gone into a tree stand or ground blind once in the past 3 years without my bible. "I'd rather be hunting and thinking about God than in church thinking about hunting"

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from asrenstrom wrote 7 weeks 6 days ago

I can see where the view of taking Sunday away from the Lord is disappointing from a view point, but I don't think a forced ban is right either. Especially since many people (myself included) enjoy the Lord's work more than any other time while in the woods or on the water. I haven't gone into a tree stand or ground blind once in the past 3 years without my bible. "I'd rather be hunting and thinking about God than in church thinking about hunting"

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from fishguts1 wrote 7 weeks 6 days ago

elkslayer, of the top ten states with the highest church attendance, nine allow Sunday hunting. Those that do not allow Sunday hunting have some of the lowest church attendance rates. The two have nothing to do with each other.

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from Longrifle wrote 7 weeks 6 days ago

As I see it, the lack of Sunday hunting is a major factor in the poor recruitment rates of new hunters. Always a big consideration that has prevented me from purchasing a Maine non-resident license some years. Us working people don't get enough time off.

Why don't some of these politicians that support a ban push for shutting off the cable tv, or banning public sporting events on Sundays. Hypocrites.

Here in PA the farmers are the driving force against Sunday hunting for various reasons. I'm cool with that as long as they are not given crop damage depredation permits.

And yes, I am a church going man.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from VAHunter540 wrote 7 weeks 6 days ago

I am very happy about this and agree with asrenstrom in that there are few places, besides a church, that I feel more closely connected with God. I don't expect it’s so for everyone and it doesn’t have to be. When you are sitting high on a mountain on a crisp clear fall day and you watch the sunrise creep across the valley below, illuminating all the fall colors and the warmth touching your face, that is as pretty of a picture as any stained glass window. I won’t hunt every Sunday just like I don’t make it to church every Sunday, life happens, but I make time no matter the day or where I am to acknowledge God.
I am youngish, 30, recently married, still “earning” my vacation days at the job. Kids are soon to be on the way. My weekends seem to always have something going on. One more day to be allowed to hunt is just one extra opportunity to hunt. It allows me the chance to spread myself out better amongst all my responsibilities and still find time to do the things I love. It’s one more opportunity to hunt with Dad, with friends, and share the experience of hunting with someone new.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from vasportsman wrote 7 weeks 6 days ago

COULD NOT BE HAPPIER! I think it is more a property rights issue than a religion issue though, everyone wants to make it a religion issue, but the real driving force behind it was that Safari Club International was going to sue Virginia on constitutional grounds as a test case if it didn't pass this year, and the folks in Richmond finally caved. They figured out how to circumvent the "sub-committee of doom" that killed it every year and bang, come July we are free from the blue law! At least mostly...

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from Sarge01 wrote 7 weeks 6 days ago

I live in a state where there is no Sunday hunting, except for a couple counties. Checking hunters for over 35 years the subject rarely came up. Most of our landowners have voiced their opinion and even if Sunday hunting is allowed most landowners are not going to allow Sunday hunting on their property anyway. The hunting club where I hunt is an example, the landowner says regardless there won't be any Sunday hunting on his property. We have 8 counties in our state that allow Sunday hunting on private property and the Officers tell me that the hunters can't find any place to hunt because of the private landowners objection to Sunday hunting.

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from westmichhunter wrote 3 weeks 2 days ago

Saturdays and sundays are the only days I get to hunt. you take away sunday and all I have is 4 days a month to hunt. im glad I live in Michigan.

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from westmichhunter wrote 3 weeks 2 days ago

Saturdays and sundays are the only days I get to hunt. you take away sunday and all I have is 4 days a month to hunt. im glad I live in Michigan.

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