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  • March 20, 2014

    Tennessee Teens Snag Stolen $10,000 with Fishing Lure

    By Ben Romans

    Two teenage boys recently made their catch of a lifetime when one of their Rat-L-Trap lures snagged a bag full of money. Mark Spicer and Dylan Crumbley thought they initially had a turtle latched on to the end of the line. They dragged the bag to shore, looked inside, and found $10,000 of red-stained bills, permanently damaged from an explosive dye pack, ABC affiliate WTVC reports.
     
    Amazingly, the boys were able to snag another sack of money from the same area while Rhea County Investigator Mike Owenby was on the scene to inspect the catch. The bags are likely loot from a botched robbery that took place last December.

  • March 20, 2014

    Hooded Vandal Dumps Elk Urine Into Car Ventilation

    By Ben Romans

    A surveillance camera outside John Lindgren’s home in Portland, Ore., recently filmed a hooded person pouring elk urine into his car’s ventilation system, OregonLive.com reports.

    The vandal emptied two containers of frothy liquid at the base of the windshield. Lindgren, a manager for United Grain Corp., a wheat exporting company, wrote in a crime report that he believes he is being targeted by members of the International Longshore and Warehouse Union because of his involvement in an ongoing labor dispute with them.

  • March 19, 2014

    California Drought: Salmon Stocks Might Get Shipped to Sea

    By David Draper

    As it’s been said, desperate times call for desperate measures. The ongoing drought in California has made conditions beyond desperate for salmon stocks (as well as plenty of other fish and game). As a result, hatchery managers there are planning to give salmon smolts a lift by transferring them via water trucks to the ocean if water levels in the Sacramento River drop below a pre-determined level, the Sacramento Bee reports:

    “[S]tate and federal wildlife officials announced a plan to move hatchery-raised salmon by truck in the event the state’s ongoing drought makes the Sacramento River and its tributaries inhospitable for the fish. They fear the rivers could become too shallow and warm to sustain salmon trying to migrate to sea on their own. Shrunken habitat could deplete food supply for the young fish, and make them easier prey for predators. It also would make the water warmer, which can be lethal to salmon.

  • March 19, 2014

    Video: The Ultimate Turkey Hunting Bike

    By Will Brantley

    I can’t tell you how many times I’ve read to “take a mountain bike turkey hunting.” It’s a great idea in theory that rarely pans out in real life, due largely to the limitations of the bike itself. 

    The tires on a typical bike are too skinny to maintain balance at slow speed, much less get traction on a sloppy springtime trail. There’s nowhere really good to carry your gun or bow, and riding while wearing a turkey vest is difficult. Most mountain bikes are painted in gaudy colors, too. That’s OK if you’re a spandex-wearing granola cruncher (or just riding for fun), but turkeys do not like bright, shiny things. Usually, you’re just as well off to walk.

  • March 18, 2014

    Awesome Deer Stand Photos From Wisconsin

    By Ben Romans


    Photo by Jason Vaughn

    Photographer Jason Vaughn didn’t grow up with much hunting experience. So when he moved to Wisconsin and saw deer blinds in rural for the first time, he was captivated by their beauty and wanted to learn more about them. That interest has transformed into his “Hide” series, a project chronicling the setting and history behind Wisconsin’s hunting tradition, Slate.com reports.
     
    Vaughn would drive around the state looking for blinds to photograph. During the process of seeking permission from the owner, he’d usually learn something unique about a stand’s construction or history — many are handmade and passed down among family generations.

  • March 18, 2014

    Florida Angler Catches Possible World-Record Pacific Snook

    By Ben Romans

    A Florida man caught a pending world-record 60-pound Pacific snook in Costa Rica two weeks ago.
     
    According to FloridaToday.com, Ward Michaels, a fishing guide from Orlando, Fla., has traveled to both coasts of Costa Rica more than 80 times in the last 27 years to target snook. He planned his latest trip around March’s new moon, knowing the chances of catching big, spawning females were high.
     
    “The new moons in March and April are when the big females stage off the beaches before they move into the rivers to spawn,” said Michaels. “Each time, everything happens in three days.”

  • March 17, 2014

    Photo: Coolest Firewood Pile Ever

    By The Editors

    This photo has been floating around for a while, but now it's catching attention on Imgur.

    So if you're seeing this shot for the first time, here's the scoop: An artist from British Columbia named Alastair Heseltine took a lot of time to painstakingly build this firewood pile into the shape of a felled tree.

  • March 17, 2014

    Extreme Winter Hurts Great Lakes Duck Population

    By David Draper


    CC image from Wikipedia

    The long winter in the northern half of the U.S. has been hard on everything, including resident populations of waterfowl that rely on fish for a substantial portion of their diet — fish that are now locked beneath a historical amount of ice on the Great Lakes and other area waters. Along the Niagara River in New York, red-breasted mergansers seem to be the species suffering most from starvation, though scaup, canvasbacks and grebes have also likely been affected, the Associated Press reports:

    Biologists say carcasses began piling up by the hundreds in early January after the plunging temperatures started icing over nearly the entire Great Lakes, preventing the ducks from getting to the minnows that are their main source of food. Necropsies on dozens of birds have confirmed the cause: starvation.

  • March 14, 2014

    How to Call In a Gobbler ... with a Nail

    By Dave Hurteau

    Not only can it be done, but there are two ways to do it: 1) You can hold a nail in your off hand, or put it in your pocket, while you call in a turkey with a turkey call; 2) you can use the nail, along with a block of wood and a piece of slate, to make turkey sounds that lure in your tom.

    Doug Herman with Cottonwood Hunting Lodge in Nebraska does it the second way. In fact, when we asked Herman, in the April feature story "Turkey Freaks," what call he would use if he could only use one, he said: "Actually, 95 percent of my calling is from one call—a nail call I’ve used for years to mimic clucks, purrs, yelps, cutts, even kee kees. The striker is a horseshoe nail you work against a chunk of slate. You’d swear you were hearing a real turkey."

  • March 14, 2014

    Kansas Man Catches Pending State Record Rainbow Trout

    By Ben Romans

    A Kansas angler fishing Kill Creek Lake on Feb. 23 landed a 15.72-pound possible state record rainbow trout, The Kansas City Star reports. Josh McCullough was just minutes into his trip when he caught the fish.
     
    “I really thought I had a turtle at first,” said McCullough, 22. “It just wasn’t fighting that hard. But then it came to the surface and my heart started racing. I had never seen a trout this big.”