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Oil Spill Live: Will the Booms Protect the Marshes?

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May 04, 2010

Oil Spill Live: Will the Booms Protect the Marshes?

By Hal Herring

Editor’s Note: Field & Stream Contributing Editor Hal Herring and photographer/FlyTalk blogger Tim Romano are at the Louisiana coast this week to cover the impact of the oil spill on the region’s sportsmen. Their reports, photographs, and videos will be posted here at The Conservationist blog.

Hopedale, Louisiana -- Somewhere out there is an oil slick the size of Puerto Rico, and growing by the day. With fishing closed east of the mouth of the Mississippi River, there is a deep quiet- a limbo- over the docks along the bayou here. Fishing guides Travis Holeman and Jonathan Sanchez are studying a map of their home country, a fantastically complicated 186,000 acres of marsh grass and mud and oyster beds, lost ponds and snaking channels, rich with big bull redfish, speckled trout, flounder, black drum, shrimp. The people of the bayou walk past on the road, or drive by in old salt-burned pickups stacked high with the crab traps that have been pulled from the marshes by orders that came from far away from this wild place. Here is where edges of the land merge with the ocean in a kind of boiling gumbo of sea life, the harvesting of which has put food on the table and cash in the pockets of generations of men and women and children who have refused the life of cubicles and office parks for the kind of strenuous, dangerous freedom--and often poverty--that most Americans no longer understand.

So far, a north wind and the hydraulic power of the Mississippi River have kept the oil from reaching these marshes. Nobody knows how long that can last. The wellhead, 5000 feet down in the once blue water of the Gulf, keeps on pumping oil. The Coast Guard has reported that there is oil on the Chandeleur Islands, which is devastating news for anyone who has fished there. But that word—devastating--seems to have no meaning here in the inland bayous. The idea that this famed seafood place, this renowned sport fishery, this kind of riot of nature, could be contaminated with oil is simply too much for the human imagination. That’s a big part of the feeling of limbo.


This long boom, installed in open water, is getting overwashed in very moderate seas.

Late in the afternoon, Holeman takes us on a run in his boat through the marsh to look at the booms that are supposed to hold back the oil, when and if it comes. He is suspicious of the efforts, and indeed, they do look pitiful, long twists of orange vinyl fabric, slightly inflated, strung across the mouth of the channels into the marsh, and anchored deep into the mud. “They are not using local knowledge as to where to place these things,” Holeman said. “The only ones that will work are the ones that close off the smaller channels. On these long reaches, the booms are already overwashed, and this isn’t even a wind in here. This is nothing.”

The smallest waves pound at the booms, splash over them, the current (surprisingly fierce, for this whole place, which sometimes looks still, is in constant motion) forces them into great snaking loops here and there. It does, indeed, look pretty pitiful.

Holeman guns the boat and swings away fast, up yet another channel and past the ruins of an old camphouse, half lost in the water. “We have to protect the interior of the marsh. That’s the nursery, and that’s the only place where the booms will hold.”  The plans, of course, are more grandiose. Fifty to 70 miles of boom have already been set in southern Louisiana, much of it in rough open water, with varying degrees of success in making it hold. According to locals, there was no more boom material available at Hopedale to set in the interior channels, which infuriates Holeman and others who know this place.


Holeman indicates areas of the marsh that he thinks need the most protection.

Traveling back in the near dark, through channels I could not find and decipher if it meant my life, what does not seem pitiful is the marsh itself. It’s a hundred different colors of green that change as the sun sets and drops. The surface of the water is quivering here and there with dense schools of rain minnows, that suddenly scatter with a ripping sound as some predator strikes into them. Mullet leap, gulls whirl in the air over schools of bait. It seems impossible that this could ever stop.

Video: Fishing guides Travis Holeman and Jonathan Sanchez describe where they think the oil booms should be located, and why.

Comments (26)

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from ingebrigtsen wrote 3 years 50 weeks ago

In this situation i agree that with limited means one should concentrate on saving the parts that can make it all grow back over time.. when saving it all isnt possible then women and children first so to speak..
But i hope my countrys contribution with expertize and booms rated for the north sea, not just the local creek. might just help save the american wildlife. heck, someone pay my airfare and ill come there myself to clean up your mess .. atleast id actually do something to help, not just sit here and mouth off online :P

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from shane wrote 3 years 50 weeks ago

This was a great post with some good writing. I know this because it has me quite upset and angry.

Funny how this blog was created just in time for this all to happen.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from blackdawgz wrote 3 years 50 weeks ago

Telling the locals to fix that mess is like saying "Let them eat cake."

The magnitude of the pollution and poisoning is beyond human imagining.

Unless you have lived there and enjoyed that, there is no way to really come to grips with the impending mess and devastation.

It is over for any wildlife and way of life there.

The political coalitions that created this mess and who are now dodging responsibility are now moving on in their political careers toward Whatever's Next.

The only thing anybody can do there is Leave.

Their lifestyle is fishing and gardening and occasional jobs in shipyards when necessary to pay bills.

I ought to know.

Gonna be a lot of people going to Alaska.

There should be a law against mouthing rhetoric that even implies that area can be saved.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from ingebrigtsen wrote 3 years 50 weeks ago

sorry blackd- freedom of speach.. besides not trying to save something at all should be criminal even if it should proove to be inneffective in hindsight...
Atleast this will have to create public opinion demanding even better safetymeasures than before as mandatory, not something the industry regulates itself.. Besides nature is quite resilient. as long as there are some animals left of all species they will gladly repopulate the area after a thorough mechanical cleanup by humans..
Where is red adair when we need him huh.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from blackdawgz wrote 3 years 50 weeks ago

It would be like an ant crawling up an elephant's leg with rape on his mind.

That is a marsh.

You can't even walk there.

Seriously.

You are talking about dropping a poison bomb on a marshland.

What are you suggesting?

Someone to wipe it up with a rag?

It is hundreds of thousands of square miles of potholes and creeks not accessible by boat or roads or anything else.

That goo will spill over their means of entrapment on the slightest breeze and mix inextricably with the mud.

There is no cleaning it.

There's no need to apologize.

Having never been there, you don't know what you're talking about.

I grew up about 100 miles from there, near an identical situation.

The oil spilling from the unloading ships devastated the surrounding marsh, in much lesser concentrations than we're talking about here.

There is/was no cleanup because it is totally impossible.

Nothing lives there.

Nobody goes there.

I would suggest, that if you want to BS up fifty points, you should pick a topic where your ignorance and inexperience are somewhat less noticeable.

-1 Good Comment? | | Report
from blackdawgz wrote 3 years 50 weeks ago

And nobody's talking about this yet...

Many hurricanes come ashore there that are not talked about in the news.

But the first one is due in August.

It is going to coat everything within 50 miles of the water with crude like it came out of a Sears airless sprayer.

If you don't believe any of this, just go there!.

It's sad.

I grew up there and duck hunted there and fished there and frogged there.

But the biggest disaster is yet to come.

From now on, there will be this big mess of pollution waiting to be blown up by the next storm.

It will make insurance go out of sight, to say the least.

The entire area will be coated by a stinking deadly mess!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from ingebrigtsen wrote 3 years 50 weeks ago

So u use proper booms for the most critical areas, the ones rated for the north sea, stop the flow of oil on the seafloor, pump as much of that goo up from the surface and
spray it with oileating bacteria and oildispersion chems. then as u said u start cleaning the affected coast with rags and buckets and spades. affected muddy areas u use a mudsucker pump and separate the sludge from the mud. and if u can only manage to protect enough of the populations of wildlife to ensure that they could repopulate later u can actually manage to save the area for the future generations even if it might take a decade or two and cost alot..
And dawg u r not really angry at me for giving a rats ass and wanting to try to save what possibly can be saved are u??
And im sorry for the loss of the habitat from your home, but "allowed" seepage is handled alot differently than a major spill, alot more money allocated for it from just the pressure of public opinion. And i dont give a rats tail about points here. that was a low blow.
Stick to the case not the subject please ;)
peace

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from ingebrigtsen wrote 3 years 50 weeks ago

Just understand dawg that i in no effect try to minimize the damage done and the responsibility of the worlds oilbarons. im just saying all might not be lost if we just try to save what we can..

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from blackdawgz wrote 3 years 50 weeks ago

But I stopped short.

As hurricanes get up on land, they turn East by Northeast, after sucking up more seawater and putting it up as far as there is an atmosphere.

This has potential to wipe out all agribusiness in the Southeast, which is the vast majority in this country.

Crude is loaded with carcinogens.

It will not only poison the crops, it will poison every tributary and river.

Then it gets even better...

The Earth is rotating under that mess.

It will create a Toxic Belt, which will forever rain and evenly redistribute toxic crude oil mist worldwide.

It will be in the land, water, and air everywhere.

Now and forevermore.

It will significantly increase the incidence of genetic mutations and all forms of cancer.

Not only that, but do you believe this will be the last spill in the Gulf?

Guess you didn't think about it, right?

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from ingebrigtsen wrote 3 years 50 weeks ago

Good reson to try to clean as much of that mess up as possible right?

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from blackdawgz wrote 3 years 50 weeks ago

It is a swirling mess of goo that cannot be contained.

It is getting bigger with every passing nanosecond.

There is absolutely no means of cleanup in the marsh or at sea.

It cannot be controlled or contained in the Gulf.

It cannot be retrieved or cleaned from the marsh.

That's not a little bit of wet earth.

Mud in the coastal marsh is typically at least 75 feet deep.

When you come home from duck hunting there, it is up to your armpits.

The idea of getting any kind of equipment in there is not even as good as ridiculous.

So we're back to trying to wipe the crude from the mud with paper towels or whatever.

From your remarks, I can tell you've never been there.

GO!

Go have a look.

It is unlike anything you have ever seen and is beyond your wildest imaginings.

The marsh (inaccessible as it is) may be as big as all the wheat fields in this country.

To say those people are tough understates the case.

They have been living like this since the English ran us out of Nova Scotia in 1755.

They're not dumb.

Their very lives depend upon a clean water supply.

I feel quite sure that, if there were any way of cleaning it up, they wouldn't need somebody from Kansas or wherever telling them to do so!!!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from ingebrigtsen wrote 3 years 50 weeks ago

kansas dude??! im from norway and have seen first hand how a cleanupoperation worked on our ragged coast. 8 years later the wildlife was back and only some carciogenic effects remained on certain waterfowls..
But i understand u suggest doing nothing at all is the way to go :P

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from blackdawgz wrote 3 years 50 weeks ago

But it's not at all like the Coast of Norway!

I'm not suggesting this.

Those people have enough money to go fishing again tomorrow and that's all!

This idea may be foreign to you, but they are a rock bottom priority in the overall scheme of things, and that is their last refuge.

They have never received government support from outsiders, and it ain't gonna happen.

This is the sixth National Government to ignore their needs, due to political insignificance.

To go out there with a roll of paper towels would be incredible waste, and would mean doing without food.

You're not used to this.

But this ain't Norway.

Let me tell you about the game here...

If you do not have a political connection, you will be ignored at best.An entire class (race of people) who never campaigned for civil rights is discovering what it's like to not have any.

The cost of a cleanup (if it were possible) would overshadow the national debt.

This is a worldwide death.

That marshland is flooded.

Much more of it is underwater than above.

The ground is infirm and there is absolutely no access.

The Gulf is not smooth.

It is so choppy and windblown that the methods of containment are laughable.

The onshore pollution is inaccessible.

The onshore pollution is inaccessible.

The onshore pollution is inaccessible.

Get it?

I know you don't understand the geography or the politics.

You are in a foreign country.

Things are different here.

It doesn't take Einstein to see that the idea of a marsh is foreign to you.

But I know that at least 5 hurricanes will come through that mess this Summer.

Not 8 years from now.

How?

I used to live there.

I remember seeing boats washed 20 miles inland.

Spray is a lot lighter than that.

We're looking at worldwide pollution.

Anyone who would persist with your argument would have to be an employee of BP or one of its subsidiaries.

Not arguable.

I am a college-educated person with 3 University degrees, including engineering.

I had a double major with pre-med.

My arguments are purely mathematical logic, based in the natural sciences, including plenty of biology.

I also have a business degree and understand about economics and public relations.

I also am a former Fedreal Executive, so I know that game well.

This is an enormous disaster.

There's going to be a blame game, deflections and diffusions, massive coverups, and the Mushroom Treatment.

If you imagine that the locals can do anything but are not,

Or if you believe there is a solution to even the current status, then I must say that you are as naive about the United States as I would expect you to be.

-1 Good Comment? | | Report
from blackdawgz wrote 3 years 50 weeks ago

Right now there is a PR campaign trying to brainwash people that this is less of a disaster than it is.

If you buy that, they will import more people from Norway.

The only good thing that ever came out of Norway was Nils Bohr, but even his theories were eventually discarded.

It would take a foreigner to believe any of the hogwash that implies there is any hope for this, and that the worldwide danger is not totally cataclysmic.

Even if there are no more major spills (impossible), the crop damage and increased incidence of cancer and genetic defect worldwide will be difficult to cover up with out major control of The Press.

-1 Good Comment? | | Report
from blackdawgz wrote 3 years 50 weeks ago

OK, Denmark.

All the same from my perspective halfway around the world.

Whatever.

The point that I guess I've missed that is the key to your lack of understanding is that you don't speak enough English to understand the issues.

Life here is dawg-eat-dawg.

The "News" varies according to the source.

This is as major a fast-lane issue as will ever be.

Everybody lying to get through the day.

That's all this is anymore.

I repeat, these are major-league fast lane Amerikan issues.

There is probably not one player in this who knows what the truth is.

But one thing stands clear above all the rest:

You don't know what the Marsh is!!!

-1 Good Comment? | | Report
from ingebrigtsen wrote 3 years 50 weeks ago

Dawg u make alot of assumptions about me just cos im a foreigner to u. Dont, i have a university degree in biology and wildlife preservation. and im not spouting the propaganda of the oilcompanies at all or defend them in any of this. if u think so then u r surely attacking the wrong person here.. But u assume they cant separate mud and oil, but dude they do this on a daily basis to get oil out of the ground. all im saying, or trying to say to u, is that oil can be cleaned up more or less from anywhere. If enough money is spent and enough people are working on it. Norway has spent billions advancing our knowledge and equipment to contain and clean up oilspills and were helping u yanks clean up your mess with booms that actually work even in bad weather etc. And we have become increasingly good at it. And an estimate i saw just today put the price of the cleanup at approximately 70 billion us. And it wasnt FOX news dawg :P
For the local populous this is a severe tragedy, but they will survive and if it can be cleaned up properly they will have the opportunity in the future to go back and pick up theire old lifestyle. Or dont u think we norwegians hasnt been affected in the past by disasterous spills u probably dont remember tjernobyl ;)
But i do see your point bro, peace :)

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Bella wrote 3 years 49 weeks ago

Blackdawg you have said everything I would have said and much more. No the booms will not hold, the Gulf is being poisoned to death.

-2 Good Comment? | | Report
from blackdawgz wrote 3 years 49 weeks ago

Bella: I was going to call it off anyway.

I realized I was having a battle of the wits with an unarmed man.

And his comments ended up badly composed, reflecting a complete lack of understanding based on language difficulties....

When I went out on the dusty trail, I didn't even slow down there.

Petrochemical pollution has been out of hand there for decades, and most people there will probably not notice.

Just another layer of oil on the wildlife.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from dighunter wrote 3 years 49 weeks ago

dawg, instead of spouting gloom and doom and the "no sense in trying attitude, why not listen to some of what in ingebrigtsen has to say. The norwegians may have some way of helping get this cleaned up that can be used to lessen the amount of damage done. The area will not be the same for a long time, but hopefully some of the area can be saved and eventually get back to life.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from buckhead wrote 3 years 49 weeks ago

Dawg, your argument would carry a lot more weight if you wouldn't insult the person you're arguing with.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from blackdawgz wrote 3 years 49 weeks ago

Know ye also that I did not come here looking for an argument.

Or a following.

There's no ego involvement.

Some will enjoy logical argument as much as anything else on this site.

If you are not versed in mathematical logic, it would be best to skip most of my stuff, unless you detect a high-brow playful jab.

I am only the product of certified university programs and mentoring by geniuses who work for our government.

I am a Thinking Machine.

Put in all the information, and I arrive at an indisputable conclusion.

I have never lost a technical argument, and it ain't gonna happen here.

On the other hand, I am also an Ordained Minister.

I am real big on Religious Themes.

I always bluntly tell the truth.

Since I tell the truth, I am entitled to it, and can find out anything.

Enough on this subject.

Take it or leave it.

-2 Good Comment? | | Report
from YooperJack wrote 3 years 49 weeks ago

I'm by far, not the sharpest tool in the shed. I never took Organic Chem. I do know that oil is much heavier than seawater. Would it be possible to pump, right at the surface, fill tanks with this pumpage, when full, drain said tanks from the bottom. When the drainage starts to be oil, turn the spicot. That should be almost pure crude. Put that in a tank for refinement and start over. It would take lots of tankers, lots of barges, etc. However, we're not talking about a for-profit endeavor, we're talking about saving the environment and people's livelihoods.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from YooperJack wrote 3 years 49 weeks ago

ACH! I meant oil is much LIGHTER than seawater.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Mike Diehl wrote 3 years 49 weeks ago

Short term disaster, long-term mitigatable, assuming anyone wants to pay for the mitigation costs. Seems like BD's answer is no one should bother trying to clean it up.

There was a much larger oil spill in 1978 in the gulf that came from a Mexican rig. Flow rate four times as great as the one happening now with that BP rig, and it lasted a YEAR before anyone got it shut off.

The plain fact is that there are bacteria that will eat the stuff, and sunlight does degrade it. Whether it's fast enough or good enough to prevent substantial disperal into Louisiana's interior from hurricanes is in doubt.

Dead Zone No Good For Agribusiness? Please. I like horror movies as much as anyone but aerosolized crude oil wiping out all crops in the south is baloney. It's as baloney as Giant Radioactive Mutant Ants.

+4 Good Comment? | | Report
from ohiodeerhunter wrote 3 years 49 weeks ago

Until the well is capped completly,and the flow of oil shut off,the booms,dispersants,oil eating babteria,and setting oil on fire are the best chances of somewhat limiting the damage.
The best booms should be placed to protect the marshes,and done with input from the people who are on the water every day...they know the most about currents,tides,effects of wind from every direction,and which channels carry the most water.
Skim the oil,light it on fire,pump it onto barges,do whatever it takes to lessen the environmental impact of this spill.
Finally,STOP LETTING BP,and all the rest,SET THEIR OWN SAFETY STANDARDS. Make real sure this can not happen again.It was Cheny who said the better blowout preventers were too costly.Worth it now,Huh?
There are enough people in the US who are smart enough to find a solution to this spill.
We need to stop the blame game,the politics,the doomsday scenarios,and FIND A WAY TO CLEAN IT UP!!!!

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Mike Diehl wrote 3 years 49 weeks ago

I dunno. I rather like the blame game. It's not like the event was unforseeable. It's just that the oil exec bastages who had the previous admin in their pockets had a particular point of view: Screw Americans. What they want is nothing to us if it affects the bottom line.

*Better* blowout preventers could be paid for by spending less money bribing politicians and simply getting the job *done*.

Instead, American corporations went from "Can do!" to "F___ you!"

+3 Good Comment? | | Report

Post a Comment

from Mike Diehl wrote 3 years 49 weeks ago

Short term disaster, long-term mitigatable, assuming anyone wants to pay for the mitigation costs. Seems like BD's answer is no one should bother trying to clean it up.

There was a much larger oil spill in 1978 in the gulf that came from a Mexican rig. Flow rate four times as great as the one happening now with that BP rig, and it lasted a YEAR before anyone got it shut off.

The plain fact is that there are bacteria that will eat the stuff, and sunlight does degrade it. Whether it's fast enough or good enough to prevent substantial disperal into Louisiana's interior from hurricanes is in doubt.

Dead Zone No Good For Agribusiness? Please. I like horror movies as much as anyone but aerosolized crude oil wiping out all crops in the south is baloney. It's as baloney as Giant Radioactive Mutant Ants.

+4 Good Comment? | | Report
from buckhead wrote 3 years 49 weeks ago

Dawg, your argument would carry a lot more weight if you wouldn't insult the person you're arguing with.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from Mike Diehl wrote 3 years 49 weeks ago

I dunno. I rather like the blame game. It's not like the event was unforseeable. It's just that the oil exec bastages who had the previous admin in their pockets had a particular point of view: Screw Americans. What they want is nothing to us if it affects the bottom line.

*Better* blowout preventers could be paid for by spending less money bribing politicians and simply getting the job *done*.

Instead, American corporations went from "Can do!" to "F___ you!"

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from dighunter wrote 3 years 49 weeks ago

dawg, instead of spouting gloom and doom and the "no sense in trying attitude, why not listen to some of what in ingebrigtsen has to say. The norwegians may have some way of helping get this cleaned up that can be used to lessen the amount of damage done. The area will not be the same for a long time, but hopefully some of the area can be saved and eventually get back to life.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from ingebrigtsen wrote 3 years 50 weeks ago

Good reson to try to clean as much of that mess up as possible right?

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from YooperJack wrote 3 years 49 weeks ago

I'm by far, not the sharpest tool in the shed. I never took Organic Chem. I do know that oil is much heavier than seawater. Would it be possible to pump, right at the surface, fill tanks with this pumpage, when full, drain said tanks from the bottom. When the drainage starts to be oil, turn the spicot. That should be almost pure crude. Put that in a tank for refinement and start over. It would take lots of tankers, lots of barges, etc. However, we're not talking about a for-profit endeavor, we're talking about saving the environment and people's livelihoods.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from shane wrote 3 years 50 weeks ago

This was a great post with some good writing. I know this because it has me quite upset and angry.

Funny how this blog was created just in time for this all to happen.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from ingebrigtsen wrote 3 years 50 weeks ago

In this situation i agree that with limited means one should concentrate on saving the parts that can make it all grow back over time.. when saving it all isnt possible then women and children first so to speak..
But i hope my countrys contribution with expertize and booms rated for the north sea, not just the local creek. might just help save the american wildlife. heck, someone pay my airfare and ill come there myself to clean up your mess .. atleast id actually do something to help, not just sit here and mouth off online :P

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from ingebrigtsen wrote 3 years 50 weeks ago

sorry blackd- freedom of speach.. besides not trying to save something at all should be criminal even if it should proove to be inneffective in hindsight...
Atleast this will have to create public opinion demanding even better safetymeasures than before as mandatory, not something the industry regulates itself.. Besides nature is quite resilient. as long as there are some animals left of all species they will gladly repopulate the area after a thorough mechanical cleanup by humans..
Where is red adair when we need him huh.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from ingebrigtsen wrote 3 years 50 weeks ago

kansas dude??! im from norway and have seen first hand how a cleanupoperation worked on our ragged coast. 8 years later the wildlife was back and only some carciogenic effects remained on certain waterfowls..
But i understand u suggest doing nothing at all is the way to go :P

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from ingebrigtsen wrote 3 years 50 weeks ago

Dawg u make alot of assumptions about me just cos im a foreigner to u. Dont, i have a university degree in biology and wildlife preservation. and im not spouting the propaganda of the oilcompanies at all or defend them in any of this. if u think so then u r surely attacking the wrong person here.. But u assume they cant separate mud and oil, but dude they do this on a daily basis to get oil out of the ground. all im saying, or trying to say to u, is that oil can be cleaned up more or less from anywhere. If enough money is spent and enough people are working on it. Norway has spent billions advancing our knowledge and equipment to contain and clean up oilspills and were helping u yanks clean up your mess with booms that actually work even in bad weather etc. And we have become increasingly good at it. And an estimate i saw just today put the price of the cleanup at approximately 70 billion us. And it wasnt FOX news dawg :P
For the local populous this is a severe tragedy, but they will survive and if it can be cleaned up properly they will have the opportunity in the future to go back and pick up theire old lifestyle. Or dont u think we norwegians hasnt been affected in the past by disasterous spills u probably dont remember tjernobyl ;)
But i do see your point bro, peace :)

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from ohiodeerhunter wrote 3 years 49 weeks ago

Until the well is capped completly,and the flow of oil shut off,the booms,dispersants,oil eating babteria,and setting oil on fire are the best chances of somewhat limiting the damage.
The best booms should be placed to protect the marshes,and done with input from the people who are on the water every day...they know the most about currents,tides,effects of wind from every direction,and which channels carry the most water.
Skim the oil,light it on fire,pump it onto barges,do whatever it takes to lessen the environmental impact of this spill.
Finally,STOP LETTING BP,and all the rest,SET THEIR OWN SAFETY STANDARDS. Make real sure this can not happen again.It was Cheny who said the better blowout preventers were too costly.Worth it now,Huh?
There are enough people in the US who are smart enough to find a solution to this spill.
We need to stop the blame game,the politics,the doomsday scenarios,and FIND A WAY TO CLEAN IT UP!!!!

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from blackdawgz wrote 3 years 50 weeks ago

Telling the locals to fix that mess is like saying "Let them eat cake."

The magnitude of the pollution and poisoning is beyond human imagining.

Unless you have lived there and enjoyed that, there is no way to really come to grips with the impending mess and devastation.

It is over for any wildlife and way of life there.

The political coalitions that created this mess and who are now dodging responsibility are now moving on in their political careers toward Whatever's Next.

The only thing anybody can do there is Leave.

Their lifestyle is fishing and gardening and occasional jobs in shipyards when necessary to pay bills.

I ought to know.

Gonna be a lot of people going to Alaska.

There should be a law against mouthing rhetoric that even implies that area can be saved.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from YooperJack wrote 3 years 49 weeks ago

ACH! I meant oil is much LIGHTER than seawater.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from blackdawgz wrote 3 years 50 weeks ago

And nobody's talking about this yet...

Many hurricanes come ashore there that are not talked about in the news.

But the first one is due in August.

It is going to coat everything within 50 miles of the water with crude like it came out of a Sears airless sprayer.

If you don't believe any of this, just go there!.

It's sad.

I grew up there and duck hunted there and fished there and frogged there.

But the biggest disaster is yet to come.

From now on, there will be this big mess of pollution waiting to be blown up by the next storm.

It will make insurance go out of sight, to say the least.

The entire area will be coated by a stinking deadly mess!

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from blackdawgz wrote 3 years 50 weeks ago

But I stopped short.

As hurricanes get up on land, they turn East by Northeast, after sucking up more seawater and putting it up as far as there is an atmosphere.

This has potential to wipe out all agribusiness in the Southeast, which is the vast majority in this country.

Crude is loaded with carcinogens.

It will not only poison the crops, it will poison every tributary and river.

Then it gets even better...

The Earth is rotating under that mess.

It will create a Toxic Belt, which will forever rain and evenly redistribute toxic crude oil mist worldwide.

It will be in the land, water, and air everywhere.

Now and forevermore.

It will significantly increase the incidence of genetic mutations and all forms of cancer.

Not only that, but do you believe this will be the last spill in the Gulf?

Guess you didn't think about it, right?

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from blackdawgz wrote 3 years 50 weeks ago

It is a swirling mess of goo that cannot be contained.

It is getting bigger with every passing nanosecond.

There is absolutely no means of cleanup in the marsh or at sea.

It cannot be controlled or contained in the Gulf.

It cannot be retrieved or cleaned from the marsh.

That's not a little bit of wet earth.

Mud in the coastal marsh is typically at least 75 feet deep.

When you come home from duck hunting there, it is up to your armpits.

The idea of getting any kind of equipment in there is not even as good as ridiculous.

So we're back to trying to wipe the crude from the mud with paper towels or whatever.

From your remarks, I can tell you've never been there.

GO!

Go have a look.

It is unlike anything you have ever seen and is beyond your wildest imaginings.

The marsh (inaccessible as it is) may be as big as all the wheat fields in this country.

To say those people are tough understates the case.

They have been living like this since the English ran us out of Nova Scotia in 1755.

They're not dumb.

Their very lives depend upon a clean water supply.

I feel quite sure that, if there were any way of cleaning it up, they wouldn't need somebody from Kansas or wherever telling them to do so!!!

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from blackdawgz wrote 3 years 49 weeks ago

Bella: I was going to call it off anyway.

I realized I was having a battle of the wits with an unarmed man.

And his comments ended up badly composed, reflecting a complete lack of understanding based on language difficulties....

When I went out on the dusty trail, I didn't even slow down there.

Petrochemical pollution has been out of hand there for decades, and most people there will probably not notice.

Just another layer of oil on the wildlife.

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from ingebrigtsen wrote 3 years 50 weeks ago

So u use proper booms for the most critical areas, the ones rated for the north sea, stop the flow of oil on the seafloor, pump as much of that goo up from the surface and
spray it with oileating bacteria and oildispersion chems. then as u said u start cleaning the affected coast with rags and buckets and spades. affected muddy areas u use a mudsucker pump and separate the sludge from the mud. and if u can only manage to protect enough of the populations of wildlife to ensure that they could repopulate later u can actually manage to save the area for the future generations even if it might take a decade or two and cost alot..
And dawg u r not really angry at me for giving a rats ass and wanting to try to save what possibly can be saved are u??
And im sorry for the loss of the habitat from your home, but "allowed" seepage is handled alot differently than a major spill, alot more money allocated for it from just the pressure of public opinion. And i dont give a rats tail about points here. that was a low blow.
Stick to the case not the subject please ;)
peace

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from ingebrigtsen wrote 3 years 50 weeks ago

Just understand dawg that i in no effect try to minimize the damage done and the responsibility of the worlds oilbarons. im just saying all might not be lost if we just try to save what we can..

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from blackdawgz wrote 3 years 50 weeks ago

It would be like an ant crawling up an elephant's leg with rape on his mind.

That is a marsh.

You can't even walk there.

Seriously.

You are talking about dropping a poison bomb on a marshland.

What are you suggesting?

Someone to wipe it up with a rag?

It is hundreds of thousands of square miles of potholes and creeks not accessible by boat or roads or anything else.

That goo will spill over their means of entrapment on the slightest breeze and mix inextricably with the mud.

There is no cleaning it.

There's no need to apologize.

Having never been there, you don't know what you're talking about.

I grew up about 100 miles from there, near an identical situation.

The oil spilling from the unloading ships devastated the surrounding marsh, in much lesser concentrations than we're talking about here.

There is/was no cleanup because it is totally impossible.

Nothing lives there.

Nobody goes there.

I would suggest, that if you want to BS up fifty points, you should pick a topic where your ignorance and inexperience are somewhat less noticeable.

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from blackdawgz wrote 3 years 50 weeks ago

But it's not at all like the Coast of Norway!

I'm not suggesting this.

Those people have enough money to go fishing again tomorrow and that's all!

This idea may be foreign to you, but they are a rock bottom priority in the overall scheme of things, and that is their last refuge.

They have never received government support from outsiders, and it ain't gonna happen.

This is the sixth National Government to ignore their needs, due to political insignificance.

To go out there with a roll of paper towels would be incredible waste, and would mean doing without food.

You're not used to this.

But this ain't Norway.

Let me tell you about the game here...

If you do not have a political connection, you will be ignored at best.An entire class (race of people) who never campaigned for civil rights is discovering what it's like to not have any.

The cost of a cleanup (if it were possible) would overshadow the national debt.

This is a worldwide death.

That marshland is flooded.

Much more of it is underwater than above.

The ground is infirm and there is absolutely no access.

The Gulf is not smooth.

It is so choppy and windblown that the methods of containment are laughable.

The onshore pollution is inaccessible.

The onshore pollution is inaccessible.

The onshore pollution is inaccessible.

Get it?

I know you don't understand the geography or the politics.

You are in a foreign country.

Things are different here.

It doesn't take Einstein to see that the idea of a marsh is foreign to you.

But I know that at least 5 hurricanes will come through that mess this Summer.

Not 8 years from now.

How?

I used to live there.

I remember seeing boats washed 20 miles inland.

Spray is a lot lighter than that.

We're looking at worldwide pollution.

Anyone who would persist with your argument would have to be an employee of BP or one of its subsidiaries.

Not arguable.

I am a college-educated person with 3 University degrees, including engineering.

I had a double major with pre-med.

My arguments are purely mathematical logic, based in the natural sciences, including plenty of biology.

I also have a business degree and understand about economics and public relations.

I also am a former Fedreal Executive, so I know that game well.

This is an enormous disaster.

There's going to be a blame game, deflections and diffusions, massive coverups, and the Mushroom Treatment.

If you imagine that the locals can do anything but are not,

Or if you believe there is a solution to even the current status, then I must say that you are as naive about the United States as I would expect you to be.

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from blackdawgz wrote 3 years 50 weeks ago

Right now there is a PR campaign trying to brainwash people that this is less of a disaster than it is.

If you buy that, they will import more people from Norway.

The only good thing that ever came out of Norway was Nils Bohr, but even his theories were eventually discarded.

It would take a foreigner to believe any of the hogwash that implies there is any hope for this, and that the worldwide danger is not totally cataclysmic.

Even if there are no more major spills (impossible), the crop damage and increased incidence of cancer and genetic defect worldwide will be difficult to cover up with out major control of The Press.

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from blackdawgz wrote 3 years 50 weeks ago

OK, Denmark.

All the same from my perspective halfway around the world.

Whatever.

The point that I guess I've missed that is the key to your lack of understanding is that you don't speak enough English to understand the issues.

Life here is dawg-eat-dawg.

The "News" varies according to the source.

This is as major a fast-lane issue as will ever be.

Everybody lying to get through the day.

That's all this is anymore.

I repeat, these are major-league fast lane Amerikan issues.

There is probably not one player in this who knows what the truth is.

But one thing stands clear above all the rest:

You don't know what the Marsh is!!!

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from Bella wrote 3 years 49 weeks ago

Blackdawg you have said everything I would have said and much more. No the booms will not hold, the Gulf is being poisoned to death.

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from blackdawgz wrote 3 years 49 weeks ago

Know ye also that I did not come here looking for an argument.

Or a following.

There's no ego involvement.

Some will enjoy logical argument as much as anything else on this site.

If you are not versed in mathematical logic, it would be best to skip most of my stuff, unless you detect a high-brow playful jab.

I am only the product of certified university programs and mentoring by geniuses who work for our government.

I am a Thinking Machine.

Put in all the information, and I arrive at an indisputable conclusion.

I have never lost a technical argument, and it ain't gonna happen here.

On the other hand, I am also an Ordained Minister.

I am real big on Religious Themes.

I always bluntly tell the truth.

Since I tell the truth, I am entitled to it, and can find out anything.

Enough on this subject.

Take it or leave it.

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