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Romano: New Carp Record Broken On A Fly

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May 21, 2010

Romano: New Carp Record Broken On A Fly

By Tim Romano

I'm sure by now most of you know my affinity for carp on the fly. They grow large, live almost everywhere, pull like little locomotives, and are a very technically challenging fish to catch. That's why I love stories like the one that was sent to me earlier this week about an angler named J.D. McKeigney. The story was originally written by Bobby Cleveland from The Clarion-Ledger in Mississippi.

McKeigney hooked and landed what now seems to be the largest freshwater fish ever caught on a fly in Mississippi just over a week ago. And yes, it was a carp, weighing in at 26.19 pounds. It apparently took over 4 1/2 hours to land.

McKeigney hooked the fish on land and from there he got into his kayak and followed the the carp into a cove where after a couple hours of fighting the fish he realized the line was snagged around something. That's when he knew he had to go swimming.

"I took everything out of my pocket, tied my rod to the kayak with my life jacket and dove in," he said. "I swam down six or seven feet and found the limb it was wrapped on. I went down two or three times and couldn't get it. Then, I noticed the boat had blown off and I had to swim 30 yards to get it."

After retrieving the boat and dealing with the now incredibly tangled line he did something I've never head of another angler doing. He cut his line, twice.

"I did the only thing I could think of. I cut the line before the tangle, swam down and cut the other end at the at the limb and tied them together."

He then fought the fish for over an hour finally netting it with some help from some neighbors and nets of varying sizes and shapes.

The real kicker is that for hours he texted back and forth with his dad on how the fight was going. Finally letting him know that he had subdued the beast over four hours from the first text.

Now I've heard some fish stories, but this is one of my favorites that I've heard in a long time. What about you? What's the craziest "fish story" that you've ever heard?

Comments (18)

Top Rated
All Comments
from Koldkut wrote 3 years 47 weeks ago

That seems like a long time for a fish that size, did he say what gear he got it on?

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from jhunt2 wrote 3 years 47 weeks ago

That great stuff! All the stuff you have been posting lately makes me want to try for so carp on fly action, what flies do you recommend using for carp?

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from mcdlacrosse9 wrote 3 years 47 weeks ago

From the original article

"For the record, it was caught on a 7-weight, 9-foot St. Croix Imperial fly rod, with old weight-forward 8-weight fly line. The leader was 12-pound Trilene XL and the backing an unknown variety of 20-pound braided dacron."

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from countitandone wrote 3 years 47 weeks ago

having "gumption" describes someone with boldness of enterprise, guts, spunk. OMG, we all can definitely say that about our boy J.D.!

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from timromano wrote 3 years 47 weeks ago

jhunt,

I'd go with a 6-8 wt rod. 12 - 20lb test and crawfish patterns, stillwater nymphs, leeches, small streamers. Think bonefish, Permit, redfish flies - just a little less gaudy. Here's one of my favorite patterns that I use here in downtown Denver http://umpqua.com/pc-1654-6-backstabber-zimmermans.aspx

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from jhunt2 wrote 3 years 47 weeks ago

Thanks! I actually didn't think you would reply, I guess I will be asking more questions

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Joseph Bishop wrote 3 years 47 weeks ago

That sounds like a "fish story". If it did happen its really impressive I just have a hard time believing it.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Koldkut wrote 3 years 47 weeks ago

Tim, it's high time for a CarpTalk: segment.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from countitandone wrote 3 years 47 weeks ago

Hey TR, since you asked, here's mine...Lake Washington has long been compared to Loc Ness for it's wooded shoreline, the nine (9) different species of fish, it's cold, clear, freshwater appeal AND the urban myth of... The Monster. Growing up hearing stories, seeing blurred or out of focus photographs in the Seattle Times along with actual "eye witness" accounts of hump-back sightings in the Lake, have stirred the local imagination for generations around here. Until one day in 1999. A newspaper photograph, clear and in color, showed a full size pickup truck bed completely full of a black, fish-like fleshy form, with a gargantuan head and the last third of it's length and tail hanging over the tailgate and on the ground. What was it? Why did it smell sooo baaad? Come to find out, this Lake Washington Monster we had all known about for, like I said, generations, was...a one hundred eighty year old (180 Yr.) Sturgeon. Fisheries biologists at the UW (University of Washington), Dr. Donaldson and State Fisheries spokespersons surmised the animal had traveled from the Pacific Ocean, through the Straights of Juan de Fuca, took a right turn (south) down Puget Sound and then turned left (east) through Salmon Bay and then the Fremont Canal, through Lake Union, through the Mountlake Cut Canal and Portage Bay and finally became "trapped" in Lake Washington. No, this male had not been caught via the hook and line...now that would have been a fish story. Alas, he died of natural causes, old age. Ah, forklore justified!

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from jakenbake wrote 3 years 47 weeks ago

I can honestly say I never would have thought to take the measures that guy took - first getting in a boat to chase the fish, then diving down, cutting your line, tying your line back together?? I mean, at that point, shouldn't you go down there with a net, wrap the fish up in it, and drag it up? That's quite a story! And countitandone, THAT's quite a story too, but somehow that's even more believable than the story of the carp! Sturgeon are amazing creatures!

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from woodsmanj35 wrote 3 years 47 weeks ago

Talk about dedecation!

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from fflutterffly wrote 3 years 47 weeks ago

And how many 6 packs were in that kayak? I just can't believe it took 4.5 hours. If he had time to text he had time to bring in that great fish! Good on ya mate!

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from TFrymyer31 wrote 3 years 47 weeks ago

What a great fish and an even better story.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Sayfu wrote 3 years 47 weeks ago

I had on a bigger carp than that one. I fought it for 5 hrs before I couldn't budge it. There was a scuba diver that came flopping over in his flippers, and wanted to see how big it was. I told him that I had fought it for 5 hrs. and now couldn't budge the darn thing. I sent the guy down to see what was going on, and he comes back telling me the thing is well over 40 lbs, and is huge! I told him I knew that, but why couldn't I budge it? He tells me that there was an old Ford P/U down there, and the carp is inside that P/u! I asked him if he could get it out of there, and the scuba diver tells me he tried, but every time he did, the darn thing would lock the door, and roll up the window! And now you know the truth about that article.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Bassmasterking wrote 3 years 47 weeks ago

great fish, classic story

-1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Sayfu wrote 3 years 45 weeks ago

countitandone..

When did you fish Lk Washington? I lived on Mercer Island for a number of years, and was one of the first year sockeye salmon guys to get out there and catch them, when they said it couldn't be done. The slow fished U-20 red flatfish was the lure that worked, and then the bare red Gamagatsu hooks slayed them in later years.
Great eating fish, and my wife and I slide our 12 ft. aluminium into the lake off a dead end street below the floating bridge and had a limit before work many a morning.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Drew McClure wrote 3 years 45 weeks ago

I guess everything having to do with flyfishing is that much more noteworthy. Since carp, as far as I know, eat plants this sort of ruins the "I did it with a fly rod..." aura. The real story is that the carp is an overlooked sportfish, that can excite young and old kids with a very large fight regardless of tackle.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Sayfu wrote 3 years 43 weeks ago

McClure, No,.. carp eat more than just vegetation. Carp love crawdads..doesn't ruin the "I did it with a flyrod" at all. If you delve into it, there is quite a strategy for catching carp on the fly. You can sit on the dock of a bay, and go to sleep waiting for your bell to ring, or you can stalk carp being very cautious not to disturb the water because they are highly sensitive to sound, and water vibrations, and you can train yourself to know what visible, surface carp are willing takers, and which ones aren't believe it or not...school fish are not willing takers, they are just moving, and the singles, the doubles maybe, are looking for food, and the right fly cast just in front of them brings a very satisfying take, and an incredible fight..your choice as to how you want to do it.

0 Good Comment? | | Report

Post a Comment

from countitandone wrote 3 years 47 weeks ago

Hey TR, since you asked, here's mine...Lake Washington has long been compared to Loc Ness for it's wooded shoreline, the nine (9) different species of fish, it's cold, clear, freshwater appeal AND the urban myth of... The Monster. Growing up hearing stories, seeing blurred or out of focus photographs in the Seattle Times along with actual "eye witness" accounts of hump-back sightings in the Lake, have stirred the local imagination for generations around here. Until one day in 1999. A newspaper photograph, clear and in color, showed a full size pickup truck bed completely full of a black, fish-like fleshy form, with a gargantuan head and the last third of it's length and tail hanging over the tailgate and on the ground. What was it? Why did it smell sooo baaad? Come to find out, this Lake Washington Monster we had all known about for, like I said, generations, was...a one hundred eighty year old (180 Yr.) Sturgeon. Fisheries biologists at the UW (University of Washington), Dr. Donaldson and State Fisheries spokespersons surmised the animal had traveled from the Pacific Ocean, through the Straights of Juan de Fuca, took a right turn (south) down Puget Sound and then turned left (east) through Salmon Bay and then the Fremont Canal, through Lake Union, through the Mountlake Cut Canal and Portage Bay and finally became "trapped" in Lake Washington. No, this male had not been caught via the hook and line...now that would have been a fish story. Alas, he died of natural causes, old age. Ah, forklore justified!

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from jakenbake wrote 3 years 47 weeks ago

I can honestly say I never would have thought to take the measures that guy took - first getting in a boat to chase the fish, then diving down, cutting your line, tying your line back together?? I mean, at that point, shouldn't you go down there with a net, wrap the fish up in it, and drag it up? That's quite a story! And countitandone, THAT's quite a story too, but somehow that's even more believable than the story of the carp! Sturgeon are amazing creatures!

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from fflutterffly wrote 3 years 47 weeks ago

And how many 6 packs were in that kayak? I just can't believe it took 4.5 hours. If he had time to text he had time to bring in that great fish! Good on ya mate!

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Koldkut wrote 3 years 47 weeks ago

That seems like a long time for a fish that size, did he say what gear he got it on?

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from jhunt2 wrote 3 years 47 weeks ago

That great stuff! All the stuff you have been posting lately makes me want to try for so carp on fly action, what flies do you recommend using for carp?

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from mcdlacrosse9 wrote 3 years 47 weeks ago

From the original article

"For the record, it was caught on a 7-weight, 9-foot St. Croix Imperial fly rod, with old weight-forward 8-weight fly line. The leader was 12-pound Trilene XL and the backing an unknown variety of 20-pound braided dacron."

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from countitandone wrote 3 years 47 weeks ago

having "gumption" describes someone with boldness of enterprise, guts, spunk. OMG, we all can definitely say that about our boy J.D.!

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Joseph Bishop wrote 3 years 47 weeks ago

That sounds like a "fish story". If it did happen its really impressive I just have a hard time believing it.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Koldkut wrote 3 years 47 weeks ago

Tim, it's high time for a CarpTalk: segment.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from woodsmanj35 wrote 3 years 47 weeks ago

Talk about dedecation!

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Sayfu wrote 3 years 47 weeks ago

I had on a bigger carp than that one. I fought it for 5 hrs before I couldn't budge it. There was a scuba diver that came flopping over in his flippers, and wanted to see how big it was. I told him that I had fought it for 5 hrs. and now couldn't budge the darn thing. I sent the guy down to see what was going on, and he comes back telling me the thing is well over 40 lbs, and is huge! I told him I knew that, but why couldn't I budge it? He tells me that there was an old Ford P/U down there, and the carp is inside that P/u! I asked him if he could get it out of there, and the scuba diver tells me he tried, but every time he did, the darn thing would lock the door, and roll up the window! And now you know the truth about that article.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from timromano wrote 3 years 47 weeks ago

jhunt,

I'd go with a 6-8 wt rod. 12 - 20lb test and crawfish patterns, stillwater nymphs, leeches, small streamers. Think bonefish, Permit, redfish flies - just a little less gaudy. Here's one of my favorite patterns that I use here in downtown Denver http://umpqua.com/pc-1654-6-backstabber-zimmermans.aspx

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from jhunt2 wrote 3 years 47 weeks ago

Thanks! I actually didn't think you would reply, I guess I will be asking more questions

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from TFrymyer31 wrote 3 years 47 weeks ago

What a great fish and an even better story.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Sayfu wrote 3 years 45 weeks ago

countitandone..

When did you fish Lk Washington? I lived on Mercer Island for a number of years, and was one of the first year sockeye salmon guys to get out there and catch them, when they said it couldn't be done. The slow fished U-20 red flatfish was the lure that worked, and then the bare red Gamagatsu hooks slayed them in later years.
Great eating fish, and my wife and I slide our 12 ft. aluminium into the lake off a dead end street below the floating bridge and had a limit before work many a morning.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Drew McClure wrote 3 years 45 weeks ago

I guess everything having to do with flyfishing is that much more noteworthy. Since carp, as far as I know, eat plants this sort of ruins the "I did it with a fly rod..." aura. The real story is that the carp is an overlooked sportfish, that can excite young and old kids with a very large fight regardless of tackle.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Sayfu wrote 3 years 43 weeks ago

McClure, No,.. carp eat more than just vegetation. Carp love crawdads..doesn't ruin the "I did it with a flyrod" at all. If you delve into it, there is quite a strategy for catching carp on the fly. You can sit on the dock of a bay, and go to sleep waiting for your bell to ring, or you can stalk carp being very cautious not to disturb the water because they are highly sensitive to sound, and water vibrations, and you can train yourself to know what visible, surface carp are willing takers, and which ones aren't believe it or not...school fish are not willing takers, they are just moving, and the singles, the doubles maybe, are looking for food, and the right fly cast just in front of them brings a very satisfying take, and an incredible fight..your choice as to how you want to do it.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Bassmasterking wrote 3 years 47 weeks ago

great fish, classic story

-1 Good Comment? | | Report

Post a Comment

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