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Going High-Risk with Camera in Hand

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November 18, 2010

Going High-Risk with Camera in Hand

By Joe Cermele

Normally I don't tip you guys off as to where I'll be shooting the next episode of "Hook Shots." That's partially because I like to keep it a secret, and partially because sometimes a shoot comes together spontaneously...I happen to be fishing, the camera is there, and all the pieces magically fall in place. But this Sunday I'm leaving for a shoot that I already know will likely go one of two ways: complete glory or complete failure. The target species leaves little room in between. Can you guess what it is?

It's muskie. See, I've gone on my share of muskie hunts. I've seen them sunning, had them follow my lure, and watched others on the boat hook them up. But to date, I have no muskie to call my own. Where I'm headed (which I'll keep quite for now), the fishing is not super sexy. No giant wooden jerkbaits or spinners, but mostly slow-trolling live bait around fish looking to fatten up for winter. Frankly, I don't care how I catch them, so long as one comes to the net. In the meantime, I've been psyching myself up by watching videos like the one below. We definitely won't be flyfishing on this trip, but the gents in the clip do a fine job of capturing the lore of muskies.

Any tips or words of wisdom from the muskie crowd, I'm all ears. One way or another, you'll find out how I did.


Comments (7)

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from buckhunter wrote 3 years 21 weeks ago

If I was to put money on your location I would say Lake St. Clair but many more good lakes exist in the northern regions of the US.

I saw this video clip on the Chum the other day. It's a good video but they act like they invented the sport. I know guys that have been pike and muskie fishing on the fly for 30 years and I know there are many more guys doing so for much longer.

The best tip I can give you is to pause your lure/fly just before it reaches sight of the boat. I have had many hook-ups doing this.

If you are trolling make sure you have a shallow lure in the prop wash.

Oh, and sharpen your hooks and make sure you have a good 3 foot steel leader. Muskies strike from the front.

Good Luck.

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from RichardF wrote 3 years 21 weeks ago

cast a million and one times

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from nuclear_fisher wrote 3 years 21 weeks ago

Live bait is good, but I would recommend trolling a large spoon in front of or in the group as an attractor. If the live bait is not working, don't be afraid to use a dead minnow on either an inline spinner or directly on a spoon. Good Luck!

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from wisc14 wrote 3 years 21 weeks ago

suckers are always good in the fall. however, the jerkbait bite has been good, at least earlier in the fall. i haven't been out in a couple weeks

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from iowahunter18 wrote 3 years 21 weeks ago

Good luck with catching them. My great grandpa caught a 3 foot tiger muskie once.

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from jamesti wrote 3 years 21 weeks ago

anyone wanna go to livingston?

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from jeffisutherland wrote 3 years 21 weeks ago

Cast to where you think the muskie won't be. I did that the first time I went muskie fishing and did quite well.

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Post a Comment

from buckhunter wrote 3 years 21 weeks ago

If I was to put money on your location I would say Lake St. Clair but many more good lakes exist in the northern regions of the US.

I saw this video clip on the Chum the other day. It's a good video but they act like they invented the sport. I know guys that have been pike and muskie fishing on the fly for 30 years and I know there are many more guys doing so for much longer.

The best tip I can give you is to pause your lure/fly just before it reaches sight of the boat. I have had many hook-ups doing this.

If you are trolling make sure you have a shallow lure in the prop wash.

Oh, and sharpen your hooks and make sure you have a good 3 foot steel leader. Muskies strike from the front.

Good Luck.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from RichardF wrote 3 years 21 weeks ago

cast a million and one times

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from nuclear_fisher wrote 3 years 21 weeks ago

Live bait is good, but I would recommend trolling a large spoon in front of or in the group as an attractor. If the live bait is not working, don't be afraid to use a dead minnow on either an inline spinner or directly on a spoon. Good Luck!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from wisc14 wrote 3 years 21 weeks ago

suckers are always good in the fall. however, the jerkbait bite has been good, at least earlier in the fall. i haven't been out in a couple weeks

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from iowahunter18 wrote 3 years 21 weeks ago

Good luck with catching them. My great grandpa caught a 3 foot tiger muskie once.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from jamesti wrote 3 years 21 weeks ago

anyone wanna go to livingston?

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from jeffisutherland wrote 3 years 21 weeks ago

Cast to where you think the muskie won't be. I did that the first time I went muskie fishing and did quite well.

0 Good Comment? | | Report

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