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November 07, 2011

ATVs Are Not Evil

By Kirk Deeter

All too often I read about ATVs in the context of the evil threat to fishing and hunting habitat. It's not the ATVs that are the threat. It's the people driving who decide what habitat gets ruined or not.

I get angry when both sides of the argument try to polarize the debate. It's up to ATV riders who use their machines for sporting purposes and have a legitimate, vested concern in hunting and fishing habitat to voice their interests, as the vast majority in the middle of the bell curve.

If you hate ATVs and think they should be banned, get your head out of the sand. ATVs are not going away, and they've opened outdoor recreation for many. Conversely, if you like to tear around in circles, and don't give a rip about what you ruin in the process, get your head out of your exhaust pipe. It's not a God-given right to ruin public land and ruin hunting and fishing for everyone else.

The good news is that many ATV and hunting/fishing interests are working together and figuring out ways to protect everyone's best interests.

I was just told by Trout Unlimited about a program called Sportsmen Ride Right (SRR). Here in Colorado, SRR, TU, Tread Lightly!, Rocky Mountain Ramblers, and Creepers Jeepers, all joined together in an effort to keep a popular section of the Middle Mountain trail in the San Juan National Forest open to motorized use.

Forest Service officials have announced their intention to close the last section of the trail at Tuckerville, a mile short of where the trail currently ends at a parking area near the Weminuche Wilderness boundary. San Juan National Forest officials are taking action because of repeated incursions by off-highway vehicles (OHV) into the wilderness.

The final section of trail was opened to motorized use in 2009 after local motorized enthusiasts assured the Forest Service that allowing motorized users to ride to the edge of the Weminuche would not encourage incursions into the wilderness area. Fencing and a gate were installed at the trail’s end in 2010 with the help of Creepers Jeepers, a local four-wheel-drive enthusiasts’ club, but the gate was torn down this summer.

Lovely.

In a joint letter to the San Juan National Forest sent today, SRR and the off-road vehicle clubs asked that the final section of the road be kept open and in return offered to help the Forest Service construct a new barrier in place of the one that was vandalized and to help monitor the area.

“We want to help the Forest Service address this issue,” said Matt Clark, Backcountry Coordinator for TU in Southwest Colorado. He also noted that the road is an important access point for sportsmen. “Our plan is to provide some funding that can be used to rebuild the barrier and to work with local OHV clubs to provide some volunteers to help in construction and maintenance work.

Sportsmen Ride Right was organized this year as a coalition of sportsmen who use motorized vehicles to access hunting and fishing on public land. As motorized users, SRR members know the importance of access, but recognize that the privilege of motorized access comes with the responsibility to protect vital fish and game habitat and follow the rules of the trail."

Makes perfect sense to me. After all, I'd rather we do our policing than wait for someone else to do that for us. Wouldn't you?

And is it really that hard to set reasonable rules, like when we drive cars, hunt or fish within regulations?

Comments (22)

Top Rated
All Comments
from wildandfree wrote 2 years 24 weeks ago

It's about time average hunter gets involved in travel management. All to often we sit on the sidelines. ATVs are fine when used right and can be a great tool. Just stay on designated trails. When folks leave the trail they ruin habitat and experience for other sportsmen and other people follow them. It's common sense really, don't bite the hand that feeds you. Thanks for letting us know about this Kirk.

+6 Good Comment? | | Report
from GregMc wrote 2 years 24 weeks ago

Good thoughts Deeter. It's nice when people just pony up and get things done.
Funny thing is, that's what sportsmen have always done. When we see a problem, we fix it. We don't wait for agencies to do it for us.
Sportsmen pay the bills for wildlife agencies, we do habitat restoration, we conserve and we work to pass it on to the next generation.
Making sure we are setting a good example when driving in the backcountry is just part of our large conservation responsibility.

+7 Good Comment? | | Report
from wgiles wrote 2 years 24 weeks ago

Just because you can doesn't mean that you should. Those who ride without regard to the damage that they can do should be held responsible. My wife got her boys a four wheeler some years ago and I noticed a bunch of ruts in the field next door. That field had just been planted in winter wheat. I had to explain it to the farmer.

+4 Good Comment? | | Report
from cTXn wrote 2 years 24 weeks ago

I think you make a good point that needs to transverse across many other activities. Taking personal responsibility for the privileges we enjoy ensure that we get to keep those privileges. Sadly, it seems our country has forgotten that intrinsic value in more ways than one. Its refreshing to see an organization like SRR.

+4 Good Comment? | | Report
from Bootheel Hunter wrote 2 years 24 weeks ago

I don't own an ATV, not because I am against them, but just because I don't need one. I can get just about anywhere with a 4 wheel drive and walk from there. Only about 2 percent of the land in New Mexico is more than a mile from a road anyway. Hell my truck broke down right before elk season last year and I was able to get into good elk hunting from where I parked our car. I've got a long list of extra guns, rods, knives, dogs I'd spend money on way before I bothered to shell out thousands for an ATV. If I lived somewhere where I just drove it out of the house, that might be different, but it is not on the top of my list of toys to haul around at this time.
Like a lot of hunters, I've had outings ruined by irresponsible ATV users. I've cursed at damaged habitat and lazy hunters who don't get off the bike. But I'm also one of those people who are not against ATV's. They are just another tool and they need to be used right. Sportsmen Ride Right is a terrific development, and like they say on the website, the ATV has really been in existence since the Willy's Jeep, there are just more people using them and more potential for abuse these days. When I was a kid we spent a lot of time fishing in the bighorn mountains of Wyoming where we walked into lakes on old jeep trails. The forest service eventually closed some of them to motorized use. If you look back through history sportsmen have always policed ourselves before others had to, and it is part of the reason we have such good opportunity in this country today. Thanks for the positive news.
We're all sportsmen, we all use motorized vehicles and we all have a right and responsibility to use our motorized vehicles responsibly and not ruin it for the next guy.

+8 Good Comment? | | Report
from Clay Cooper wrote 2 years 24 weeks ago

Thanks Deeter

The company I keep, you will not find them tearing around in circles and if they did, this would be the last trip with me.

During my 4 years in Alaska, I was blessed with the vast access I had into remote areas. "Tread Lightly" is what I truly believe in and avoid mud holes as much as possible. In fact, that's the fastest way to destroy any piece of equipment, mud a water is an allergen to things that cost money.

Sir Kirk, I can go into depth and wright a novel, but it sounds like the right attitude and what really kneads to be done is now going in the right direction and picking up momentum.

One thing I like to point out and becoming a major concern, areas now closed to ORV's, I've notice vegetation now growing over those trails, but wildlife is nonexistent in those areas.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from tom donohue wrote 2 years 24 weeks ago

"Tread lightly" and ATV's is an oxymoron. I want atvs and their use banned from natl forests and blm lands and
am working to see that happens. im sick of the abuse and damage these vehicles and there moronic operators cause to our precious natl resources. Riders have consistently demonstrated that they are incapable of policing themselves or others.

+5 Good Comment? | | Report
from Roderick K. Purcell wrote 2 years 24 weeks ago

ATVs are just a tool -- appropriate in some places, inappropriate in others. Kudos for groups like TU and responsible riders to sort out where they belong and where they don't. We learned in centuries past that if "anything goes," we will soon have nothing left.

+6 Good Comment? | | Report
from Tony Berg wrote 2 years 24 weeks ago

National forets are public land, if there are ATV trails that people are allowed to ride on then they have every right to be on them. I am a hunter and an ATV rider. The group I ride with are mostly hunters also and we stay on designated trails. Everyone wants to jump all over ATV riders, and there are some irresponsible ones out there that ruin it for everyone. But, there are also alot of irresponsible hunters out there and I don't hear anyone trying to ban all hunting in national parks because of a few poachers. I feel this country is suffering from a lack of respect for others. I think that is the real issue here.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Matthew Clark wrote 2 years 24 weeks ago

Bootheel Hunter took the words right out of my mouth. It's good to see reasonable folks getting together to solve problems that effect all of us in a constructive and direct way. It's easy to be a hypocrite, much harder to take and honest look at something and figure out how to improve it. Sportsmen and women have proven time and time again that we have what it takes to do just that.

+4 Good Comment? | | Report
from rock rat wrote 2 years 24 weeks ago

I hate 4 wheel drive clubs even more than the mountain bike lobby. They lobby congress not to make wilderness areas because they can't get their lard buts up the mountain without a motor to carry them. They should stick to high fence hunting or Texas or something.

The science is irrefutable. ATVs disturb wildlife.

http://www.fs.fed.us/pnw/lagrande/starkey_na/PDFs_Preprints/ms-06_Wisdom...

+5 Good Comment? | | Report
from Clay Cooper wrote 2 years 24 weeks ago

Tony Berg, may I add

I carry trash bags to carryout the trash the hikers leave including putting out there campfires left still burning. And once in a while, I'll run into a person or group requiring to be transported out for medical or other purposes. Mostly to turn them around into the right direction! Not once did I come across a group upset about my ATV.

NICE TRY!

xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

When it comes to ORV's, it’s interesting those who brings all kinds of charges and proves none have no real firsthand experience themselves.

O'my God! These Elk are terrified of my ORV!!

http://www.fieldandstream.com/photos/trophyroom/recent/single?pnid=10013...

And other things they overlook, or better yet, turn a blind eye to!

http://www.fieldandstream.com/photos/trophyroom/recent/single?pnid=10013...

http://www.fieldandstream.com/photos/trophyroom/recent/single?pnid=10013...

http://www.fieldandstream.com/photos/trophyroom/recent/single?pnid=10013...

I challenge anyone to prove to me beyond a shadow of doubt, ATV's really do harm? In fact, they open up travel corridors and make going easier during the winter. Why you don't see wildlife along ATV trails, there standing still blending in while your moving is why!

Obviously, those against off road travel seriously lack the outdoor knowledge and experience of being out there. To them, roughing it, is camping out at the Super 8 Motel!

More times than I can remember over the, I had to stop and let wildlife cross the trail in front of me including Caribou and Moose and watch them start grazing a short distance after crossing.

I strongly suggest you Anti's get your "POO" in a group with firsthand knowledge and not from some blithering arm chair group or individual.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

Sir Kirk Deeter

Once again,

Awesome work, need more like this!

-6 Good Comment? | | Report
from Longbow Jarhead wrote 2 years 23 weeks ago

Finally a voice for sportsmen who responsibly use motorized vehicles. It has always been a shame that we get caught up with the irresponsible riders who won't or cant follow the rules of the trail. I've had a number of hunts blown by riders who misbehave and have wondered what to do. Now I know where my voice will be heard. Looking at what SRR is doing in Colorado and their support of the Reiter forest OHV park in Washington I know they are about the kind of access we need...responsible and respected access.

+4 Good Comment? | | Report
from Tony Berg wrote 2 years 23 weeks ago

Clay Cooper, I have actually taken a whitetail deer with a bow from an ATV trail.
(I was sitting in a tree stand, not shooting from an ATV) Seemed like they were using the ATV trail to travel easily through the heavy cover in the area.
We should all remember whether your a hunter, a hiker, or an atv rider that unless you own that property, then you are a guest there.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from dabba g wrote 2 years 23 weeks ago

Great post Deeter, and thanks for pointing out that this debate on motorized access is getting unstuck and moving forward.

Because it's not about banning motorized use on forest service and BLM land. ATVs/OHVs are here to stay.

It's not about whether ATVs/OHVs riding on renegade routes fragment big game habitat, silt up trout streams and move animals like elk out of formerly great hunting places. The science is in, they do.

It's not about whether you have a right to strap a chain saw on your machine, blaze trail and ride your ATV/OHV anywhere you want in a national forest, or spin doughnuts in the middle of a meadow or a mountain spring. You don't.

This is now about working together, as hunters and anglers who also use ATVs/OHVs, to keep the treads on the established trails and get that minority of riders who are screwing it up for all of us to do the same.

SRR looks like a great place to get started on writing a new chapter in this debate. Let's sign on and get moving.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Walt Gasson wrote 2 years 23 weeks ago

I don't own an ATV, either. That's both a personal choice and a function of the fact that I don't need one to hunt and fish where I do. But I'm dang proud of TU and Sportsmen Ride Right for gettting past the dogma on this issue. There's room in my country for ATVs if they are operated responsibly - same for hikers, mountain bikers, llama trekkers and goat packers. There's not a lot of room for irresponsible morons - regardless of what carries them and their gear.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from troutaholic wrote 2 years 23 weeks ago

Once again, it's great to see the good folks at Field and Stream (Deeter) and their hunting/fishing conservation partners ensure the sportsmen's voice is heard in the ongoing debate over OHVs. It's important to honor the fact that sportsmen generally use an OHV for access to the actual activity they're on our public lands to enjoy. For motorized enthusiasts, the use of an OHV IS the activity. It's both troubling and real, that those two values are too often dividing. Sportsmen's Ride Right is a reasonable and pragmatic program, directed at those of us who use an OHV primarily to get to our "honey hole". This is sportsmen, "policing" our own and setting an example. Good for you TU, SRR and the others who see great value in this program and have created it with balance and habitat protection in mind.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from shane wrote 2 years 23 weeks ago

"repeated incursions by off-highway vehicles (OHV) into the wilderness."

"the gate was torn down this summer."

Exactly. It never ends. I don't care if 90% (being very generous) of riders are responsible. There will always be abuses and damage. Until there is none (impossible), I want them out.

If we are to have them around refuges, parks, and wilderness/roadless areas, there needs to be serious regulations. Noise regulation with decibel limit testing for every quad to enter these areas. No racing/rear wheel drive only quads. Utility only. Strict guidelines with serious consequences for leaving designated trails. Speed limits. All that wish to enter on a quad should have that machine inspected, pass the noise tests, and get permitted. We pay for these areas. If they want to come in, they need to pay for the resource too.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from garwhal wrote 2 years 23 weeks ago

Thanks for the insight, Deeter. ATV's can be a very useful tool and should be promoted if they are used responsibly. I am a rancher as well as a sportsmen, and we couldn't get near as much done on our place without using ATV's. I hope SRR can continue to educate the general public on how to use ATV's responsibly to promote access as well as conservation and our best wild places.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Clay Cooper wrote 2 years 23 weeks ago

YEP!

Wildlife are terrified of vehicles!

https://www.facebook.com/video/video.php?v=210748768937147

NOT!

-1 Good Comment? | | Report
from plevena1 wrote 2 years 23 weeks ago

It has been my experience here in MT most riders hunt from their atv. feet never touch the ground!

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Erik Jensen wrote 2 years 23 weeks ago

I'm with Tom Donohue and Rock Rat. Maybe not banning, but close. At most, one ATV should be a support mechanism for maybe a party of hunters in some areas, for setting up stands or retrieving downed animals. We need a serious crackdown. The science on elk IS irrefutable, they hate ATVs. Whitetail deer are another matter, they are an animal that is not road-shy, but there's been a lot of hunts ruined by ATV riders ripping by whitetail hunters who had made a lot of effort to set up quietly. Regardless, the things are loud, destroy habitat, and (generally) make people who rely on them fat and hurt the hunter and angler image. Also, there is the point someone else made about how can any average Joe who is really serious about hunting and fishing shell out that money ? If I had a few grand to spend, I'd first buy some guns and rods for my kids, then look at a guided wilderness moose or elk hunt if I had enough kaching left.

0 Good Comment? | | Report

Post a Comment

from Bootheel Hunter wrote 2 years 24 weeks ago

I don't own an ATV, not because I am against them, but just because I don't need one. I can get just about anywhere with a 4 wheel drive and walk from there. Only about 2 percent of the land in New Mexico is more than a mile from a road anyway. Hell my truck broke down right before elk season last year and I was able to get into good elk hunting from where I parked our car. I've got a long list of extra guns, rods, knives, dogs I'd spend money on way before I bothered to shell out thousands for an ATV. If I lived somewhere where I just drove it out of the house, that might be different, but it is not on the top of my list of toys to haul around at this time.
Like a lot of hunters, I've had outings ruined by irresponsible ATV users. I've cursed at damaged habitat and lazy hunters who don't get off the bike. But I'm also one of those people who are not against ATV's. They are just another tool and they need to be used right. Sportsmen Ride Right is a terrific development, and like they say on the website, the ATV has really been in existence since the Willy's Jeep, there are just more people using them and more potential for abuse these days. When I was a kid we spent a lot of time fishing in the bighorn mountains of Wyoming where we walked into lakes on old jeep trails. The forest service eventually closed some of them to motorized use. If you look back through history sportsmen have always policed ourselves before others had to, and it is part of the reason we have such good opportunity in this country today. Thanks for the positive news.
We're all sportsmen, we all use motorized vehicles and we all have a right and responsibility to use our motorized vehicles responsibly and not ruin it for the next guy.

+8 Good Comment? | | Report
from GregMc wrote 2 years 24 weeks ago

Good thoughts Deeter. It's nice when people just pony up and get things done.
Funny thing is, that's what sportsmen have always done. When we see a problem, we fix it. We don't wait for agencies to do it for us.
Sportsmen pay the bills for wildlife agencies, we do habitat restoration, we conserve and we work to pass it on to the next generation.
Making sure we are setting a good example when driving in the backcountry is just part of our large conservation responsibility.

+7 Good Comment? | | Report
from wildandfree wrote 2 years 24 weeks ago

It's about time average hunter gets involved in travel management. All to often we sit on the sidelines. ATVs are fine when used right and can be a great tool. Just stay on designated trails. When folks leave the trail they ruin habitat and experience for other sportsmen and other people follow them. It's common sense really, don't bite the hand that feeds you. Thanks for letting us know about this Kirk.

+6 Good Comment? | | Report
from Roderick K. Purcell wrote 2 years 24 weeks ago

ATVs are just a tool -- appropriate in some places, inappropriate in others. Kudos for groups like TU and responsible riders to sort out where they belong and where they don't. We learned in centuries past that if "anything goes," we will soon have nothing left.

+6 Good Comment? | | Report
from tom donohue wrote 2 years 24 weeks ago

"Tread lightly" and ATV's is an oxymoron. I want atvs and their use banned from natl forests and blm lands and
am working to see that happens. im sick of the abuse and damage these vehicles and there moronic operators cause to our precious natl resources. Riders have consistently demonstrated that they are incapable of policing themselves or others.

+5 Good Comment? | | Report
from rock rat wrote 2 years 24 weeks ago

I hate 4 wheel drive clubs even more than the mountain bike lobby. They lobby congress not to make wilderness areas because they can't get their lard buts up the mountain without a motor to carry them. They should stick to high fence hunting or Texas or something.

The science is irrefutable. ATVs disturb wildlife.

http://www.fs.fed.us/pnw/lagrande/starkey_na/PDFs_Preprints/ms-06_Wisdom...

+5 Good Comment? | | Report
from wgiles wrote 2 years 24 weeks ago

Just because you can doesn't mean that you should. Those who ride without regard to the damage that they can do should be held responsible. My wife got her boys a four wheeler some years ago and I noticed a bunch of ruts in the field next door. That field had just been planted in winter wheat. I had to explain it to the farmer.

+4 Good Comment? | | Report
from cTXn wrote 2 years 24 weeks ago

I think you make a good point that needs to transverse across many other activities. Taking personal responsibility for the privileges we enjoy ensure that we get to keep those privileges. Sadly, it seems our country has forgotten that intrinsic value in more ways than one. Its refreshing to see an organization like SRR.

+4 Good Comment? | | Report
from Matthew Clark wrote 2 years 24 weeks ago

Bootheel Hunter took the words right out of my mouth. It's good to see reasonable folks getting together to solve problems that effect all of us in a constructive and direct way. It's easy to be a hypocrite, much harder to take and honest look at something and figure out how to improve it. Sportsmen and women have proven time and time again that we have what it takes to do just that.

+4 Good Comment? | | Report
from Longbow Jarhead wrote 2 years 23 weeks ago

Finally a voice for sportsmen who responsibly use motorized vehicles. It has always been a shame that we get caught up with the irresponsible riders who won't or cant follow the rules of the trail. I've had a number of hunts blown by riders who misbehave and have wondered what to do. Now I know where my voice will be heard. Looking at what SRR is doing in Colorado and their support of the Reiter forest OHV park in Washington I know they are about the kind of access we need...responsible and respected access.

+4 Good Comment? | | Report
from Tony Berg wrote 2 years 24 weeks ago

National forets are public land, if there are ATV trails that people are allowed to ride on then they have every right to be on them. I am a hunter and an ATV rider. The group I ride with are mostly hunters also and we stay on designated trails. Everyone wants to jump all over ATV riders, and there are some irresponsible ones out there that ruin it for everyone. But, there are also alot of irresponsible hunters out there and I don't hear anyone trying to ban all hunting in national parks because of a few poachers. I feel this country is suffering from a lack of respect for others. I think that is the real issue here.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Walt Gasson wrote 2 years 23 weeks ago

I don't own an ATV, either. That's both a personal choice and a function of the fact that I don't need one to hunt and fish where I do. But I'm dang proud of TU and Sportsmen Ride Right for gettting past the dogma on this issue. There's room in my country for ATVs if they are operated responsibly - same for hikers, mountain bikers, llama trekkers and goat packers. There's not a lot of room for irresponsible morons - regardless of what carries them and their gear.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from shane wrote 2 years 23 weeks ago

"repeated incursions by off-highway vehicles (OHV) into the wilderness."

"the gate was torn down this summer."

Exactly. It never ends. I don't care if 90% (being very generous) of riders are responsible. There will always be abuses and damage. Until there is none (impossible), I want them out.

If we are to have them around refuges, parks, and wilderness/roadless areas, there needs to be serious regulations. Noise regulation with decibel limit testing for every quad to enter these areas. No racing/rear wheel drive only quads. Utility only. Strict guidelines with serious consequences for leaving designated trails. Speed limits. All that wish to enter on a quad should have that machine inspected, pass the noise tests, and get permitted. We pay for these areas. If they want to come in, they need to pay for the resource too.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Clay Cooper wrote 2 years 24 weeks ago

Thanks Deeter

The company I keep, you will not find them tearing around in circles and if they did, this would be the last trip with me.

During my 4 years in Alaska, I was blessed with the vast access I had into remote areas. "Tread Lightly" is what I truly believe in and avoid mud holes as much as possible. In fact, that's the fastest way to destroy any piece of equipment, mud a water is an allergen to things that cost money.

Sir Kirk, I can go into depth and wright a novel, but it sounds like the right attitude and what really kneads to be done is now going in the right direction and picking up momentum.

One thing I like to point out and becoming a major concern, areas now closed to ORV's, I've notice vegetation now growing over those trails, but wildlife is nonexistent in those areas.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from dabba g wrote 2 years 23 weeks ago

Great post Deeter, and thanks for pointing out that this debate on motorized access is getting unstuck and moving forward.

Because it's not about banning motorized use on forest service and BLM land. ATVs/OHVs are here to stay.

It's not about whether ATVs/OHVs riding on renegade routes fragment big game habitat, silt up trout streams and move animals like elk out of formerly great hunting places. The science is in, they do.

It's not about whether you have a right to strap a chain saw on your machine, blaze trail and ride your ATV/OHV anywhere you want in a national forest, or spin doughnuts in the middle of a meadow or a mountain spring. You don't.

This is now about working together, as hunters and anglers who also use ATVs/OHVs, to keep the treads on the established trails and get that minority of riders who are screwing it up for all of us to do the same.

SRR looks like a great place to get started on writing a new chapter in this debate. Let's sign on and get moving.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from garwhal wrote 2 years 23 weeks ago

Thanks for the insight, Deeter. ATV's can be a very useful tool and should be promoted if they are used responsibly. I am a rancher as well as a sportsmen, and we couldn't get near as much done on our place without using ATV's. I hope SRR can continue to educate the general public on how to use ATV's responsibly to promote access as well as conservation and our best wild places.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from plevena1 wrote 2 years 23 weeks ago

It has been my experience here in MT most riders hunt from their atv. feet never touch the ground!

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Tony Berg wrote 2 years 23 weeks ago

Clay Cooper, I have actually taken a whitetail deer with a bow from an ATV trail.
(I was sitting in a tree stand, not shooting from an ATV) Seemed like they were using the ATV trail to travel easily through the heavy cover in the area.
We should all remember whether your a hunter, a hiker, or an atv rider that unless you own that property, then you are a guest there.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from troutaholic wrote 2 years 23 weeks ago

Once again, it's great to see the good folks at Field and Stream (Deeter) and their hunting/fishing conservation partners ensure the sportsmen's voice is heard in the ongoing debate over OHVs. It's important to honor the fact that sportsmen generally use an OHV for access to the actual activity they're on our public lands to enjoy. For motorized enthusiasts, the use of an OHV IS the activity. It's both troubling and real, that those two values are too often dividing. Sportsmen's Ride Right is a reasonable and pragmatic program, directed at those of us who use an OHV primarily to get to our "honey hole". This is sportsmen, "policing" our own and setting an example. Good for you TU, SRR and the others who see great value in this program and have created it with balance and habitat protection in mind.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Erik Jensen wrote 2 years 23 weeks ago

I'm with Tom Donohue and Rock Rat. Maybe not banning, but close. At most, one ATV should be a support mechanism for maybe a party of hunters in some areas, for setting up stands or retrieving downed animals. We need a serious crackdown. The science on elk IS irrefutable, they hate ATVs. Whitetail deer are another matter, they are an animal that is not road-shy, but there's been a lot of hunts ruined by ATV riders ripping by whitetail hunters who had made a lot of effort to set up quietly. Regardless, the things are loud, destroy habitat, and (generally) make people who rely on them fat and hurt the hunter and angler image. Also, there is the point someone else made about how can any average Joe who is really serious about hunting and fishing shell out that money ? If I had a few grand to spend, I'd first buy some guns and rods for my kids, then look at a guided wilderness moose or elk hunt if I had enough kaching left.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Clay Cooper wrote 2 years 23 weeks ago

YEP!

Wildlife are terrified of vehicles!

https://www.facebook.com/video/video.php?v=210748768937147

NOT!

-1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Clay Cooper wrote 2 years 24 weeks ago

Tony Berg, may I add

I carry trash bags to carryout the trash the hikers leave including putting out there campfires left still burning. And once in a while, I'll run into a person or group requiring to be transported out for medical or other purposes. Mostly to turn them around into the right direction! Not once did I come across a group upset about my ATV.

NICE TRY!

xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

When it comes to ORV's, it’s interesting those who brings all kinds of charges and proves none have no real firsthand experience themselves.

O'my God! These Elk are terrified of my ORV!!

http://www.fieldandstream.com/photos/trophyroom/recent/single?pnid=10013...

And other things they overlook, or better yet, turn a blind eye to!

http://www.fieldandstream.com/photos/trophyroom/recent/single?pnid=10013...

http://www.fieldandstream.com/photos/trophyroom/recent/single?pnid=10013...

http://www.fieldandstream.com/photos/trophyroom/recent/single?pnid=10013...

I challenge anyone to prove to me beyond a shadow of doubt, ATV's really do harm? In fact, they open up travel corridors and make going easier during the winter. Why you don't see wildlife along ATV trails, there standing still blending in while your moving is why!

Obviously, those against off road travel seriously lack the outdoor knowledge and experience of being out there. To them, roughing it, is camping out at the Super 8 Motel!

More times than I can remember over the, I had to stop and let wildlife cross the trail in front of me including Caribou and Moose and watch them start grazing a short distance after crossing.

I strongly suggest you Anti's get your "POO" in a group with firsthand knowledge and not from some blithering arm chair group or individual.

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Sir Kirk Deeter

Once again,

Awesome work, need more like this!

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