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Gear Review: Cabela's BOA Wading Boots

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April 17, 2013

Gear Review: Cabela's BOA Wading Boots

By Kirk Deeter

Now that Tim Romano has given away a pair of the new Cabela's Guidewear BOA Wading Boots, I'm going to tell you how they work.

They're great. If you like the Boa lacing system.

BOA laces are wire, and they can be wound on a circular dial knob. Crank the dial and the laces come tight. Pull the knob out and the system loosens up, and you slide your feet right out. The lingo from everyone who markets boots with BOA laces is that the easy-on, easy-off advantages are especially valuable when it's muddy, or icy, and so forth. But let's be really honest. Boa laces work really great for people who have a spare tire around their middle, and don't like squishing themselves when they tie their laces. (I have a friend who told me this.)

I had a pair of Korkers boots with BOA laces and absolutely loved them; right up until the point when the winder failed (after about a year), and I was left tromping around in loose boots miles from home. You can always improvise with laces, but you will have issues when BOA quits.

For the record, I just started fishing the Cabela's BOA boots, and I have no reason to think they won't last as long or longer.

I really like how these boots feel. The synthetic uppers give just enough support, without biting into my ankles or shins. They're supple in those spots. They're also light. I have an easier time hiking around in these boots than I do in most other wading boots. I'm fishing on Vibram rubber soles, and I like the tread pattern's close-to-felt grip effectiveness. Priced at $160, these boots seem durable. The question you have to ask yourself is whether you want to commit to BOA laces. If so, this is a solid option.

Comments (5)

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from chadlove wrote 1 year 2 days ago

This past bird season the vast majority of my time was spent in a pair of BOA-equipped boots. Gotta say, I love 'em. I logged a ton of miles walking, and while the seams on the boots themselves blew out toward the end of the season, the BOA laces never missed a beat.

Don't know if the rigors of wading are, from a purely mechanical standpoint, any different than walking on dry ground, maybe they're just more prone to failure in that environment, but I'm hoping more boots start coming with the BOA option. At least until I get my first failure miles from the truck...

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from buckhunter wrote 1 year 2 days ago

I tried these boots out at the shop and agree, the lacing system is easy and comfortable but in the end I purchased conventional lace up boots. My reasoning was the fear of the knob wearing out. Possibly water getting into the knob and freezing or debris clogging it.

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from fflutterffly wrote 1 year 1 day ago

I use the Simms boot and for me they are the most comfortable I've ever worn. However, I can never get the boot tight enough and that's a big problem when walking in muddy. I carry 50lb picture hanging wire in my pack just for that moment when the laces do snap. But even if they did stop working you can remove them and drive a show lace through the lace slots and tie off.

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from treelimit wrote 1 year 1 day ago

Thank God your husky friend was available for comment.

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from Doug Leichliter wrote 11 weeks 5 days ago

Santa Claus brought me a pair this year. I've used them twice in rather cold freezing conditions and have nothing to complain about. I especially like how they tighten uniformly along the entire foot instead of tight here and loose there. What is especially nice is no wet knots to fool with. If one does work loose, and my left boot has, it's a cinch to tighten again. The hardest part is freeing the gravel guard hook and hooking it again afterward.

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from chadlove wrote 1 year 2 days ago

This past bird season the vast majority of my time was spent in a pair of BOA-equipped boots. Gotta say, I love 'em. I logged a ton of miles walking, and while the seams on the boots themselves blew out toward the end of the season, the BOA laces never missed a beat.

Don't know if the rigors of wading are, from a purely mechanical standpoint, any different than walking on dry ground, maybe they're just more prone to failure in that environment, but I'm hoping more boots start coming with the BOA option. At least until I get my first failure miles from the truck...

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from buckhunter wrote 1 year 2 days ago

I tried these boots out at the shop and agree, the lacing system is easy and comfortable but in the end I purchased conventional lace up boots. My reasoning was the fear of the knob wearing out. Possibly water getting into the knob and freezing or debris clogging it.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from fflutterffly wrote 1 year 1 day ago

I use the Simms boot and for me they are the most comfortable I've ever worn. However, I can never get the boot tight enough and that's a big problem when walking in muddy. I carry 50lb picture hanging wire in my pack just for that moment when the laces do snap. But even if they did stop working you can remove them and drive a show lace through the lace slots and tie off.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from treelimit wrote 1 year 1 day ago

Thank God your husky friend was available for comment.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Doug Leichliter wrote 11 weeks 5 days ago

Santa Claus brought me a pair this year. I've used them twice in rather cold freezing conditions and have nothing to complain about. I especially like how they tighten uniformly along the entire foot instead of tight here and loose there. What is especially nice is no wet knots to fool with. If one does work loose, and my left boot has, it's a cinch to tighten again. The hardest part is freeing the gravel guard hook and hooking it again afterward.

0 Good Comment? | | Report

Post a Comment