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Bourjaily Eats Crow: Light Shotguns Can Be Great for Waterfowl

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October 27, 2009

Bourjaily Eats Crow: Light Shotguns Can Be Great for Waterfowl

By Phil Bourjaily

Today’s first course is crow in a figurative sense:

I have long insisted that the best waterfowl guns weigh a lot --  eight pounds or even close to nine – for  adequate recoil absorption. I believed they should have long barrels – 28-inches or even 30 --  and weight-forward balance.  I have said so in print many times.

I was wrong. Waterfowl guns can be long and heavy, but they can be short and light, too.

This summer, I bought a barely-used Benelli M2. A 12 gauge, it is 6 pounds, 14 ounces, with a 26-inch barrel and slightly butt-heavy balance;  everything I supposedly dislike in a waterfowl gun.  And I love it. I’ve been hunting with it since our duck season opened last week and leaving my 8 ½ pound, 30-inch barreled BPS in the gun cabinet. The M2 rides lightly slung over my shoulder when I’m burdened down with decoys; the shorter barrel and butt heavy balance haven’t yet prevented me from killing nearly every duck I’ve shot at.  With reasonable loads – 1 ¼ ounces of shot at 1450 fps – it doesn’t kick too badly.  A light, compact waterfowl gun can be a joy, and I was wrong ever to say otherwise.

***

Recently I literally ate some crow, too, as in, I cooked and ate one. See photo.

My friend Mike killed the bird while we were duck hunting.  I had never actually seen a crow shot before and the idea of leaving it in the field bothered me, so I brought it home along with my ducks.

I had always been curious about eating crow. My copy of “Cooking Wild Game” by Frank Ashbrook and Edna Sater states: “ . . . some strong champions of crow meat are coming to the front with proved claims of its excellence. They state that unwarranted prejudice alone prevents many sportsmen from hunting them with an eye or thought to their table qualities.” I should note that “Cooking Wild Game” was published by the US Fish and Wildlife Service  in 1945, to encourage consumption of wild animals of all kinds (up to and including opossums*, sparrows and skunks)  to free up beef, pork and poultry for the war effort.

I breasted the bird, yielding two small medallions of red meat. I marinated them in Italian dressing overnight, then broiled them rare with some pepper jack cheese melted on top. It was really quite good. The meat was very much like duck, but tenderer .  Unfortunately, no matter how good it was, I couldn’t quite get my mind past the fact that it was crow meat.  I doubt I’ll do it again. But, I satisfied my curiosity, kept the bird from going to waste, and did my bit to smash the Axis, even if it was 64 years too late.
 
* ”Opossum with Tomato Sauce” and “Opossum Stuffing” are just two of the tempting recipes in the opossum section

Comments (33)

Top Rated
All Comments
from MLH wrote 4 years 24 weeks ago

Thank you, Phil. Now we know that crow is edible tablefare.

So ... are you willing to try some blackbird pie? I've always wondered if there was any substance behind that nursery rhyme.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from sgaredneck wrote 4 years 24 weeks ago

Around these parts some folks have eaten, and continue to eat some things that are pretty funky in my notion. At some point I've eaten a some of these funky things and a few are quite palatable. A lot of them aren't; I don't care how much seasoned salt, Italian dressing, Butt Rub, or whatever is trying to cover that funk, doesn't make those things a delicacy. Chicken salad does not result....

Like you said, the idea of eating IT, whatever that may be, can be hard to get past even if it's really OK. I think my Granddaddy making me clean and cook a sparrow I killed with my pellet gun(when I was a young kid -to prove his point about eating what you kill) maybe still haunts my mind and palate.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from rweedin wrote 4 years 24 weeks ago

Good insight on the light guns. I always thought the same way. Had my 1187 with a 30" barrel weighing 8 1/2 lbs and thought it was as good as waterfowling could get. Then I got a Browning Silver Hunter. It's light, but still has a long barrel. I love it. Hardly a noticable recoil difference and much more tolerable to carry with decoys and blind bags and layout blinds and mojos and anything else we can carry.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from JD wrote 4 years 24 weeks ago

sgaredneck:

Wow, a sparrow?? I don't agree with his thinking in that case, but I respect his belief in his policy. As a farm boy I was shooting sparrows in my "spare"time, they were mice with wings to a farmer. But I wouldn't care to eat one, or a crow either;I'll stick to ducks and pheasants and such, thank you

+4 Good Comment? | | Report
from JD wrote 4 years 24 weeks ago

Phil,

I agree about the lighter weight being beneficial in the field. With "deeks" and such my hands are full as it is. Some years ago most everybody had 30" barreled shotguns cataloged, often the "standard" shotgun offering. Some had Poly-chokes on besides,ugh! I'd take a 26" barrel on a field gun anyday. Add a good, non-slip sling and you have a great waterfowl gun that carries easily. Remove the sling and head to the cornfields for pheasants with a gun that's easy to carry all afternoon. Good article!

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from Ralph the Rifleman wrote 4 years 24 weeks ago

Phil-
This article is "cool" on so many levels! First, I am a pro-adviser of shorter bbl lighter gun school of thinking; for any type of hunting!
Second, I was blessed to have "southern" friends growing up in the old neighborhood and ate everything from Armadillo to Muskrat! Opossum is a bit greasy, but cooked/seasoned properly isn't bad at all!...but then again they say shoe leather with Garlic butter isn't bad either!!

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from idahooutdoors wrote 4 years 24 weeks ago

Nice read...enough marinade and some melted cheese almost anything can be made ediable...though my freezer is usually full of deer and elk, which sounds a little better......

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from buckstopper wrote 4 years 24 weeks ago

Kudos on your hunting ethics in not wasting game. Try Dale's Sauce next time you find yourself in simular situation. My favorite duck gun is a Browning Citori Hunter w/26" BBL. It is quick to point which works well with woodies in timber. Also, I don't have to keep up with magazine plugs.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from fisherman wrote 4 years 24 weeks ago

I absolutely agree that quick-pointing, short guns are the best guns for almost anything. Benelli makes the best guns out there. I shoot a 26" 870 which is heavy but still kicks some. For pheasant I always leave the sling on. It's useful when you're tired and want to take the load off your arms when using a heavy gun.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from dickgun wrote 4 years 24 weeks ago

I think it depends a lot on what you are shooting and where. Obviously, the semi-autos reduce recoil so weight is not as much a factor. But, some examples - a few years ago I was shooting big Canadians in Sask with some friends. One of them was shooting 3-1/2" loads in a 870. He got beat to hell. I shot a 1100 with 3" hevi shot and never flinched. Last year another friend shot an 870/12ga on DOVES in Argentina and his shoulder was black and blue. I shot a 20 auto Benelli. In September I went to Iceland to shoot their geese which are plentiful and relatively unhunted. I took my vintage L. S. Smith out of retirement. It has 32"bbs full choked on both sides and weights 8-9#. But with Briley choke tubes installed
to offer a choice of chokes it was delightful to shoot it again. Yes, it took a few rounds to get accustomed to those long barrels. In none of the above cases were we packing loads to and from our blinds so weight was not a factor. I think it is fun to shoot a lot of different guns and I am no longer bothered by killing everything I shoot at nor how many I wind up with. Re: crow - how bout seagull next?

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from kaanimal wrote 4 years 24 weeks ago

Here's some crow recipes.
I think they would probably go real good with some squirrel brain gravy!
http://www.crowbusters.com/recipes.htm

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Del in KS wrote 4 years 24 weeks ago

My father was a young man during the great depression and lived on a sharecroppers farm in GA. He said they had to eat just about everything the hunting dogs would tree and most was pretty tasty. Dad once took a pot shot at small blackbirds when I was a kid. He killed about 50 with 2 shots and it became my job (10 yrs old) to clean them. My grandmother fixed blackbirds in gravy and to the best of my memory they were very good. He never brought home a coon or possum for us to eat and that did not hurt my feelings one bit.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from toystore wrote 4 years 24 weeks ago

All the talk reminds me of the wild camp we had as kids, very interesting and exciting. Really miss them now.
Toy Store

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from toystore wrote 4 years 24 weeks ago

All the talk reminds me of the wild camp we had as kids, very interesting and exciting. Really miss them now.
Toy Store

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from nc30-06 wrote 4 years 24 weeks ago

Another good source for game and fish recipes is a book by Rebecca Gray who compiled them for Sports Afield. The book is "Eat Like A Wild Man". There are recipes for the usual fare, plus crow, iguana, fruit bat, beaver, various fish, and even plants.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from WA Mtnhunter wrote 4 years 24 weeks ago

I started using my 870 Super Mag 3 1/2" 12 gauge turkey gun with a 25 1/2" barrel (yeah, I know Remington says it's 26", but measure one) for waterfowl and it works just fine with a Patternmaster and Briley extended choke tubes. I suppose it is a bit on the light side but not as light as a Beretta or Benelli. With a Limbsaver R3 recoil pad, it works for me.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Quahog wrote 4 years 24 weeks ago

Heirloom Recipe for Seaduck :
Marinate Seaduck in italian salad dressing overnight - place in covered pan alongside a well weathered waterstruck brick.
Bake for one hour and ten minutes @ 325 degrees.
Remove from oven - dispose of Seaduck - eat brick.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from stonebridge wrote 4 years 24 weeks ago

Quahog:

Sounds very familiar to my family's recipe for "Pine Board Carp."

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from Jere Smith wrote 4 years 24 weeks ago

My Grandpa told me crow.possum and such kept hi full but not exactly happy during the depression years. he told me not tp mess with it.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Jere Smith wrote 4 years 24 weeks ago

Good article on duck hunting though, I use a Rem 1100 or 870.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from sgaredneck wrote 4 years 24 weeks ago

Quahog, stonebridge - TOO FUNNY! LMAO

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from jamesti wrote 4 years 24 weeks ago

i ate a meadow lark when i was a kid. very tasty! good to see you branching out phil.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Ricardo Rodríguez wrote 4 years 24 weeks ago

I have eaten possum when a child and it was OK, like pork, armadillo the same. Possum fat, specially that from the tail, is supposed to be very good for the flu and sore throat.

Iguana is considered a delicacy in southern Mexico, so much that it is a protected species now. It tastes like chicken, or so they say.

Recently went to a gastronomic sample where among other more common dishes served fried grasshopers, ant eggs and chinicuil (some kind of worm that eats the maguey plant, very much alike the one in the mezcal bottles).
The hopers were tasty, like fried little fish, the eggs were good in tomato sauce. The crispy fried worms had no taste at all, an the live ones... well, lets say it is an aquired taste.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from JOHN ANDERSON wrote 4 years 24 weeks ago

So far this duck season,Iv'e really enjoyed my 20ga,1100.hardly even notice it with a bag of decoys shoulderd.Nice article!

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Anhinga wrote 4 years 24 weeks ago

I grew up in rural Louisiana - that explains a lot I'm sure. As kids there were several of us that were always in the woods, on the creeks and camping out down by the farm pond. We tried to cook and eat most everything that we collected. Several types of "black" birds; redwings, grackles and crows were on the menu from time to time, but only crows, both common and fish, were eaten more than once. The "black" birds were always like chewing leather, or as one friend said many years and experiences later, like trying to eat a racketball. Our method of cooking didn't help though, deep fried in the best Southern tradition.

Regarding short, light shotguns for waterfowl; they are great, have shot several 26" barreled guns for years, but in a crowded duck blind you, and your buddies especially, better be wearing hearing protection. That 2 to 4 inch difference in barrel length makes a huge difference in muzzle blast, if not felt recoil.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Robert Ewing wrote 4 years 24 weeks ago

There is a Crow hunting season.With it you can sharpen your skills and help save the eggs of your preferred main dish.Came across a October 1952 article in Outdoor Life on hunting Crow.But after all that work,you would still have to eat crow, unless I pickle the breast and give them away instead of the fruitcake from the previous year.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Zermoid wrote 4 years 24 weeks ago

sgaredneck,
I guess no one wanted the job of setting mouse traps around your granddaddy's place, did they?
I generally say if you kill it you eat it, but I draw the line at vermin (winged or otherwise) and pests.
I'd also hate to see it if he ever had to shoot an intruder in the house, I'd be the one to bring him a knife and fork as soon as the dust settled and say "You killed it......".
Think I might wait till he put his gun down first though......

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Zermoid wrote 4 years 24 weeks ago

And BTW, I have tried Crow myself, never thought of marinating it, just floured and fried it, a little tough, and tastes like chicken/turkey gizzard. Which I happen to like! If the marinade softened it up some it would be great, I'll have to try it next time I actually hit one of them, 50-60 yds straight up is a hard shot to make!

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Tim Platt wrote 4 years 23 weeks ago

I have heard Robin is one of the finest fowl.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from jtboles wrote 4 years 23 weeks ago

Ever since i saw that you could hunt crows legaly i've wondered what the meat tasted like and how you cook it cause i personaly have never met anyone who hunts crows much less eats them thank you for the report i might consider it next year.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from coho310 wrote 4 years 23 weeks ago

Is there a skunk section?

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Robert Ewing wrote 4 years 21 weeks ago

Phil
I was at F & F today for some shells, they where pulling crow decoys for storage until next season.Started thinking back to this blog and how light shotgun would be a good fit for crow hunting.Aside from them being difficult to draw in, what to do with them when you prepare them.Now if anyone could send some crow off to "Hell's Kitchen" or "Iron Chef" one of their "sioux" chefs can come up more contemporary recipe.Since mother nature knocked down their numbers with west nile , maybe we can keep them in check. They do go after the eggs of waterfowl,upland birds and birds of prey.
By the way I did pick up a few decoys,if you come across any more recipes please post them.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from alex1988 wrote 3 years 1 week ago

I agree, you do write your articles with passion. I hope you get the time to post for me some time in the future.

Hotels in Goa

0 Good Comment? | | Report

Post a Comment

from JD wrote 4 years 24 weeks ago

sgaredneck:

Wow, a sparrow?? I don't agree with his thinking in that case, but I respect his belief in his policy. As a farm boy I was shooting sparrows in my "spare"time, they were mice with wings to a farmer. But I wouldn't care to eat one, or a crow either;I'll stick to ducks and pheasants and such, thank you

+4 Good Comment? | | Report
from JD wrote 4 years 24 weeks ago

Phil,

I agree about the lighter weight being beneficial in the field. With "deeks" and such my hands are full as it is. Some years ago most everybody had 30" barreled shotguns cataloged, often the "standard" shotgun offering. Some had Poly-chokes on besides,ugh! I'd take a 26" barrel on a field gun anyday. Add a good, non-slip sling and you have a great waterfowl gun that carries easily. Remove the sling and head to the cornfields for pheasants with a gun that's easy to carry all afternoon. Good article!

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from Ralph the Rifleman wrote 4 years 24 weeks ago

Phil-
This article is "cool" on so many levels! First, I am a pro-adviser of shorter bbl lighter gun school of thinking; for any type of hunting!
Second, I was blessed to have "southern" friends growing up in the old neighborhood and ate everything from Armadillo to Muskrat! Opossum is a bit greasy, but cooked/seasoned properly isn't bad at all!...but then again they say shoe leather with Garlic butter isn't bad either!!

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from Del in KS wrote 4 years 24 weeks ago

My father was a young man during the great depression and lived on a sharecroppers farm in GA. He said they had to eat just about everything the hunting dogs would tree and most was pretty tasty. Dad once took a pot shot at small blackbirds when I was a kid. He killed about 50 with 2 shots and it became my job (10 yrs old) to clean them. My grandmother fixed blackbirds in gravy and to the best of my memory they were very good. He never brought home a coon or possum for us to eat and that did not hurt my feelings one bit.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from Quahog wrote 4 years 24 weeks ago

Heirloom Recipe for Seaduck :
Marinate Seaduck in italian salad dressing overnight - place in covered pan alongside a well weathered waterstruck brick.
Bake for one hour and ten minutes @ 325 degrees.
Remove from oven - dispose of Seaduck - eat brick.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from stonebridge wrote 4 years 24 weeks ago

Quahog:

Sounds very familiar to my family's recipe for "Pine Board Carp."

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from MLH wrote 4 years 24 weeks ago

Thank you, Phil. Now we know that crow is edible tablefare.

So ... are you willing to try some blackbird pie? I've always wondered if there was any substance behind that nursery rhyme.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from sgaredneck wrote 4 years 24 weeks ago

Around these parts some folks have eaten, and continue to eat some things that are pretty funky in my notion. At some point I've eaten a some of these funky things and a few are quite palatable. A lot of them aren't; I don't care how much seasoned salt, Italian dressing, Butt Rub, or whatever is trying to cover that funk, doesn't make those things a delicacy. Chicken salad does not result....

Like you said, the idea of eating IT, whatever that may be, can be hard to get past even if it's really OK. I think my Granddaddy making me clean and cook a sparrow I killed with my pellet gun(when I was a young kid -to prove his point about eating what you kill) maybe still haunts my mind and palate.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from rweedin wrote 4 years 24 weeks ago

Good insight on the light guns. I always thought the same way. Had my 1187 with a 30" barrel weighing 8 1/2 lbs and thought it was as good as waterfowling could get. Then I got a Browning Silver Hunter. It's light, but still has a long barrel. I love it. Hardly a noticable recoil difference and much more tolerable to carry with decoys and blind bags and layout blinds and mojos and anything else we can carry.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from idahooutdoors wrote 4 years 24 weeks ago

Nice read...enough marinade and some melted cheese almost anything can be made ediable...though my freezer is usually full of deer and elk, which sounds a little better......

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from buckstopper wrote 4 years 24 weeks ago

Kudos on your hunting ethics in not wasting game. Try Dale's Sauce next time you find yourself in simular situation. My favorite duck gun is a Browning Citori Hunter w/26" BBL. It is quick to point which works well with woodies in timber. Also, I don't have to keep up with magazine plugs.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from fisherman wrote 4 years 24 weeks ago

I absolutely agree that quick-pointing, short guns are the best guns for almost anything. Benelli makes the best guns out there. I shoot a 26" 870 which is heavy but still kicks some. For pheasant I always leave the sling on. It's useful when you're tired and want to take the load off your arms when using a heavy gun.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from dickgun wrote 4 years 24 weeks ago

I think it depends a lot on what you are shooting and where. Obviously, the semi-autos reduce recoil so weight is not as much a factor. But, some examples - a few years ago I was shooting big Canadians in Sask with some friends. One of them was shooting 3-1/2" loads in a 870. He got beat to hell. I shot a 1100 with 3" hevi shot and never flinched. Last year another friend shot an 870/12ga on DOVES in Argentina and his shoulder was black and blue. I shot a 20 auto Benelli. In September I went to Iceland to shoot their geese which are plentiful and relatively unhunted. I took my vintage L. S. Smith out of retirement. It has 32"bbs full choked on both sides and weights 8-9#. But with Briley choke tubes installed
to offer a choice of chokes it was delightful to shoot it again. Yes, it took a few rounds to get accustomed to those long barrels. In none of the above cases were we packing loads to and from our blinds so weight was not a factor. I think it is fun to shoot a lot of different guns and I am no longer bothered by killing everything I shoot at nor how many I wind up with. Re: crow - how bout seagull next?

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from kaanimal wrote 4 years 24 weeks ago

Here's some crow recipes.
I think they would probably go real good with some squirrel brain gravy!
http://www.crowbusters.com/recipes.htm

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from nc30-06 wrote 4 years 24 weeks ago

Another good source for game and fish recipes is a book by Rebecca Gray who compiled them for Sports Afield. The book is "Eat Like A Wild Man". There are recipes for the usual fare, plus crow, iguana, fruit bat, beaver, various fish, and even plants.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from WA Mtnhunter wrote 4 years 24 weeks ago

I started using my 870 Super Mag 3 1/2" 12 gauge turkey gun with a 25 1/2" barrel (yeah, I know Remington says it's 26", but measure one) for waterfowl and it works just fine with a Patternmaster and Briley extended choke tubes. I suppose it is a bit on the light side but not as light as a Beretta or Benelli. With a Limbsaver R3 recoil pad, it works for me.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from sgaredneck wrote 4 years 24 weeks ago

Quahog, stonebridge - TOO FUNNY! LMAO

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from jamesti wrote 4 years 24 weeks ago

i ate a meadow lark when i was a kid. very tasty! good to see you branching out phil.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from JOHN ANDERSON wrote 4 years 24 weeks ago

So far this duck season,Iv'e really enjoyed my 20ga,1100.hardly even notice it with a bag of decoys shoulderd.Nice article!

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from toystore wrote 4 years 24 weeks ago

All the talk reminds me of the wild camp we had as kids, very interesting and exciting. Really miss them now.
Toy Store

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from toystore wrote 4 years 24 weeks ago

All the talk reminds me of the wild camp we had as kids, very interesting and exciting. Really miss them now.
Toy Store

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Jere Smith wrote 4 years 24 weeks ago

Good article on duck hunting though, I use a Rem 1100 or 870.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Ricardo Rodríguez wrote 4 years 24 weeks ago

I have eaten possum when a child and it was OK, like pork, armadillo the same. Possum fat, specially that from the tail, is supposed to be very good for the flu and sore throat.

Iguana is considered a delicacy in southern Mexico, so much that it is a protected species now. It tastes like chicken, or so they say.

Recently went to a gastronomic sample where among other more common dishes served fried grasshopers, ant eggs and chinicuil (some kind of worm that eats the maguey plant, very much alike the one in the mezcal bottles).
The hopers were tasty, like fried little fish, the eggs were good in tomato sauce. The crispy fried worms had no taste at all, an the live ones... well, lets say it is an aquired taste.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Anhinga wrote 4 years 24 weeks ago

I grew up in rural Louisiana - that explains a lot I'm sure. As kids there were several of us that were always in the woods, on the creeks and camping out down by the farm pond. We tried to cook and eat most everything that we collected. Several types of "black" birds; redwings, grackles and crows were on the menu from time to time, but only crows, both common and fish, were eaten more than once. The "black" birds were always like chewing leather, or as one friend said many years and experiences later, like trying to eat a racketball. Our method of cooking didn't help though, deep fried in the best Southern tradition.

Regarding short, light shotguns for waterfowl; they are great, have shot several 26" barreled guns for years, but in a crowded duck blind you, and your buddies especially, better be wearing hearing protection. That 2 to 4 inch difference in barrel length makes a huge difference in muzzle blast, if not felt recoil.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Robert Ewing wrote 4 years 24 weeks ago

There is a Crow hunting season.With it you can sharpen your skills and help save the eggs of your preferred main dish.Came across a October 1952 article in Outdoor Life on hunting Crow.But after all that work,you would still have to eat crow, unless I pickle the breast and give them away instead of the fruitcake from the previous year.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Zermoid wrote 4 years 24 weeks ago

sgaredneck,
I guess no one wanted the job of setting mouse traps around your granddaddy's place, did they?
I generally say if you kill it you eat it, but I draw the line at vermin (winged or otherwise) and pests.
I'd also hate to see it if he ever had to shoot an intruder in the house, I'd be the one to bring him a knife and fork as soon as the dust settled and say "You killed it......".
Think I might wait till he put his gun down first though......

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Zermoid wrote 4 years 24 weeks ago

And BTW, I have tried Crow myself, never thought of marinating it, just floured and fried it, a little tough, and tastes like chicken/turkey gizzard. Which I happen to like! If the marinade softened it up some it would be great, I'll have to try it next time I actually hit one of them, 50-60 yds straight up is a hard shot to make!

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Jere Smith wrote 4 years 24 weeks ago

My Grandpa told me crow.possum and such kept hi full but not exactly happy during the depression years. he told me not tp mess with it.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Tim Platt wrote 4 years 23 weeks ago

I have heard Robin is one of the finest fowl.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from jtboles wrote 4 years 23 weeks ago

Ever since i saw that you could hunt crows legaly i've wondered what the meat tasted like and how you cook it cause i personaly have never met anyone who hunts crows much less eats them thank you for the report i might consider it next year.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from coho310 wrote 4 years 23 weeks ago

Is there a skunk section?

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Robert Ewing wrote 4 years 21 weeks ago

Phil
I was at F & F today for some shells, they where pulling crow decoys for storage until next season.Started thinking back to this blog and how light shotgun would be a good fit for crow hunting.Aside from them being difficult to draw in, what to do with them when you prepare them.Now if anyone could send some crow off to "Hell's Kitchen" or "Iron Chef" one of their "sioux" chefs can come up more contemporary recipe.Since mother nature knocked down their numbers with west nile , maybe we can keep them in check. They do go after the eggs of waterfowl,upland birds and birds of prey.
By the way I did pick up a few decoys,if you come across any more recipes please post them.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from alex1988 wrote 3 years 1 week ago

I agree, you do write your articles with passion. I hope you get the time to post for me some time in the future.

Hotels in Goa

0 Good Comment? | | Report

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