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Petzal: Building a Big Bore Rifle

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February 17, 2010

Petzal: Building a Big Bore Rifle

By David E. Petzal

While cruising the aisles at the SCI Convention and suffering from Fine Rifle Burnout, I spotted something truly different at Booth 744—the stopping rifles built by Ryan Breeding. African stopping rifles are used on buffalo and elephant, and are designed to either save your ass when you  are in bad trouble, or to keep you out of it. Mr. Breeding specializes in them. He will build you a rifle in any caliber you want, but his real forte is .40-caliber on up. Way up.

Ryan Breeding learned his craft from a gunmaker named Gil Van Horn, who specialized in big guns during the second half of the last century, and taught him that building a good one meant more than simply clapping a massive barrel into a massive action. The rifle you see here is a .505 Gibbs; 600-grain bullets at 2,350 fps and 93 foot pounds of recoil, which is nearly double the kick of a .458. When you subject a rifle to this kind of strain, terrible things happen to it, and Ryan Breeding goes to considerable pains to prevent them. And he does so with artistry.

In bare terms, this rifle is a .505 Gibbs, built on a Granite Mountain bolt-action, Turkish walnut stock, a 22-inch Pac-Nor barrel, and a weight of 12 pounds. Breeding himself made the trigger, the rear sight, and the front sight. The rifle holds five cartridges, one up and four down. There is a trap under the pistol grip cap for an alternate front-sight bead and an Allen wrench to install it.

Because there is nothing more embarrassing than having your floorplate pop open and dump all your cartridges, Breeding has installed a plunger-operated lock on the floorplate release button. You have to press on it, hard, to work the release.

Because the front sight hoods (even those with detents) come flying off their ramps under heavy recoil, Breeding built a hood that is catch-operated and pivots 90 degrees around a steel pin. It locks in place in both positions.

Because many express sights come with multiple leaves (which are useless; you need only one) and adjust via banging with a hard object, Breeding builds a one-leaf sight that is screw-adjusted and locks in place when set.

What he does not build are the Talley QD mounts that come with the rifle. This says a great deal about Talley mounts.

Breeding can build you a stock in fiberglass or Turkish walnut. He makes right-hand guns or left, all sorts of options, and his work is immaculate. More important: When building monster rifles like this, it takes a high degree of artistry to keep the gun from looking like a club. Breeding is a master of this. With all respect to the many wonderful gunmakers out there, when it comes to these brutes, he does about the best work I’ve ever seen. Rbbigbores.com 

Comments (67)

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from blackdawgz wrote 4 years 8 weeks ago

Great article. This is a major reason I read this magazine.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Armchair Mike wrote 4 years 8 weeks ago

I have absolutely no need for such a rifle. That said, I REALLY want one.

+10 Good Comment? | | Report
from Happy Myles wrote 4 years 8 weeks ago

Another great booth I missed at SCI. Your comments all make good sense. The various misadventures you mentioned have all happened to me at one time or other floor plate falling open, hoods disappearing upon recoil, open sight issues, rifle not heavy enough, etc etc. Over time they all get ironed out with experience. Sounds like Mr Breeding has done this from the ground up. So often you see something like a 500 Jeffery put together as if it were a 300 H & H.

+4 Good Comment? | | Report
from Douglas wrote 4 years 8 weeks ago

A handsome rifle indeed. Any ideas on price?
(yea, I know, if ya gotta ask, you can't afford one...)

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from Mike Diehl wrote 4 years 8 weeks ago

Beautiful rifle. Unimaginably horrible recoil. Do you provide your own orthopedic surgeon on those African hunts or do they come with the package deal?

+6 Good Comment? | | Report
from RichardF wrote 4 years 8 weeks ago

I want one. The scary thing is that after scourig his website I did not find any prices so I am sure they are WAY out of my range.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from MLH wrote 4 years 8 weeks ago

I might never need a true big bore stopper but I just want one. That's a brute of a rifle. Just looked through his site - a .585 Express!

He put a lot of thought and pride into the design. I wish more makers would add a locked floorplate release, but that adds cost.

The price is flagrantly missing from your post. Some may say that if you have to ask you can't afford it. I like the story of a customer that was looking at an exotic car. He asked the price and the salesman gave him that line. The customer replied, "I can afford it because I ask." He bought the car - from a different salesman.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from jbird wrote 4 years 8 weeks ago

I'd love to shoot it, probably just once.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from TJ wrote 4 years 8 weeks ago

I want one so bad!!!!!!! I would like a laminate stock, benefits of synthetic with look of wood. Also a screw off muzzle break.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from alabamaoutlaw wrote 4 years 8 weeks ago

If you get a chance go to youtube and watch the little muslims shooting the 505 it is hilarous to watch them.Better them than me.Awesome recoil from the 505 Rifle.But the Turkish walnut does not add to the rifle it just doesn't have the pop.I'm like everybody else and can't afford be can admire the craftsmanship.
Thanks Petzal

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from Mjenkins1 wrote 4 years 8 weeks ago

Could someone please tell me what 93 foot pounds of recoil might feel like?? I just cant relate to that. The biggest thing ive shot was a .300 wby mag.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from davidpetzal wrote 4 years 8 weeks ago

To Mjenkins1: The biggest rifle I've ever shot was a .577 Westley Richards double that probably kicked about as much as the .505, all things considered. It was a huge shove that set me backpedaling. It didn't hurt, but I ended up a few feet to the rear of where I started out. The guns that really hurt are the one that put a big powder charge behind a 300-400 grain bullet. They come back at you so fast that there is no way to roll with the recoil. They can do anything from raise bruises to break blood vessels to break collarbones.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from TJ wrote 4 years 8 weeks ago

For comparison a 30-06 is around 22ftlbs of recoil

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Beekeeper wrote 4 years 8 weeks ago

Beautiful work!

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Mjenkins1 wrote 4 years 8 weeks ago

Thanks for the description davidpetzal. You know what they say: it's not fun if you're not breakin' blood vessels or collarbones.... right?

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Happy Myles wrote 4 years 8 weeks ago

I just noticed another thing I liked on this rifle. The bolt knob is polished, not checked. Checkering on the knob does not help, it just takes the hide off your finger while shooting really big bore bolt rifles.

+4 Good Comment? | | Report
from WA Mtnhunter wrote 4 years 8 weeks ago

Why anyone checkers a bolt knob is beyond me. Who grips them on that little checkering Remington puts on there anyway? Like holding a bone china tea cup for sissies!

Proper working of a bolt requires the palm and inside of the fingers held together. Never do you "grip" the bolt except for removal for cleaning. Weatherby bolts are polished and are machined from one solid piece of steel with the bolt. Nothing to be connected, just one homogeneous (big word for Arkansas) piece of steel.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from ggmack wrote 4 years 8 weeks ago

while I have never meet a situation my 300 Win Mag could not handle,I feel an overwhelming desire to buy one with a synthetic stock.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Ralph the Rifleman wrote 4 years 8 weeks ago

Looks like a nicely made hand held cannon!
I still would truely like a double rifle in .458 Lott, however; If I could truely fill my BIG GUN wishes.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Ralph the Rifleman wrote 4 years 8 weeks ago

Sorry about the "truely" twice..

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Carney wrote 4 years 8 weeks ago

Love the looks of it! When I can afford a trip to Africa I'll buy one...

Anyone know anything about the Russian company, Tzar Canon? Just saw an article that they are planning to enter the Amertican market...

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from Jim in Mo wrote 4 years 8 weeks ago

Dave, did you see Terry Wieland at the show? I'm reading his new book DGR II. This rifle looks as one he would call a solid working bolt rifle as he did a 458 Lott built by Edwin von Atzigen at 10 1/2lbs.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Ruckweiler wrote 4 years 8 weeks ago

Well built beast of a rifle. Reminds me of the story I read years ago where a big game hunter long ago was asked why he shot a .600 Nitro Express. I believe he answered,"Because they don't make a .700 Nitro Express. laddie." Don't know if that's true or not but this rifle epitomizes the idea, "If some is good, more is better." BOOM!

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from crm3006 wrote 4 years 8 weeks ago

Nice, for a bolt gun. I'm holding out for the J.Rigby double rifle in .470 NE. I need neither one, but a dream is a dream!

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Jim in Mo wrote 4 years 8 weeks ago

Dave,
PS, by looking at the belly (mag) of that gun did Granite Arms build it on an Enfield P17 action?

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from ricefarm wrote 4 years 8 weeks ago

If it takes that big of a gun to kill it, I don't want to meet it.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from davidpetzal wrote 4 years 8 weeks ago

To Jim in MO: Nope, Granite builds them from scratch. To get four of those monster rounds in the magazine, it has to look the way it does. I didn't see Terry at the show; he was off quail hunting. But I have read DGR II, and it's high on the must list for anyone who's interested in big guns.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Happy Myles wrote 4 years 8 weeks ago

Jim in Mo,
Terry told me at Dallas Safari Club he would not be at SCI in Reno, instead would be quail hunting, as I recall.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Happy Myles wrote 4 years 8 weeks ago

Jim in Mo
Whoops, sorry did not realize Dave had already answered your question

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from idduckhntr wrote 4 years 8 weeks ago

CZ makes a 505 Gibbs and 416 Rigby, I have one in 375H&H and love it. But it does'nt have the wood that beauty does.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Jim in Mo wrote 4 years 8 weeks ago

Happy, good to hear from you. My, my. Off quail hunting. There was a time we (my family) had a fair amount of quail to hunt at our country home next to my grandfathers farm. The next landowners wiped out all cover, which decimated the quail.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from IowaGuy wrote 4 years 8 weeks ago

Man, unless you played offensive tackle in the NFL, can't imagine anyone (able to stay) standing up to the recoil of this monster. Interesting article and rifle, some real workmanship went into it.

If they clone dinosaurs someday, I'll have an excuse to tell the wife why I need one a .505.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from dickgun wrote 4 years 8 weeks ago

DP,
One of my long time clients (primarily for bear) is also a man who goes back to a lot of hunting in Africa with old timers like Lew Gaimes when the Rhodesian war in (now) Zimbabwe was gearing up and before.
He has a closet full of rifles made by Van Horn and still has him building two rifles - mostly to keep the old gun maker involved and have an income. Many may think that builders, like Van Horn, are rich men, but the fact is that most small custom builders like that are not. Like classic musicians they, more often than not, worked for the art more than for the money. Van Horn's rifles are, in my opinion, of the best every made for a serious hunter of dangerous game.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from Tom in CA wrote 4 years 8 weeks ago

Ryan's rifles are near perfection, both in function and form. Workmanship is impeccable. I am lucky enough to have a .416 Rigby and a .505 Gibbs. At 50 yds., from a bench, each will put 3 shots and probably more for the very determined, into a centered hole barely larger than the caliber of the bullet. They perform and do it in rare style.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from elmer f. wrote 4 years 8 weeks ago

i wonder if 505 gibbs is to much gun for white tails?!

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from ricefarm wrote 4 years 8 weeks ago

After shooting this dinosaur killer the old 30-06 would feel like a .22. Assuming your shoulder wasn't completely unhinged.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from jwallen wrote 4 years 8 weeks ago

Beastly and elegant, just like the game it is intended for. This thing just oozes capability.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Tom-Tom wrote 4 years 8 weeks ago

Dave, help me out here...didn't the Winchester catalog offer an African rifle back in the mid 1950's, advertised as a lion finishing rifle? It looked magnificant, total artistry in function and form, but only offered in .22LR. Hunting dangerous game in Africa is but a dream for most of us. Other than admiring the beauty of such rifles, when not in Africa one could, at the very least, use the Winchester on squirrels.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Jere Smith wrote 4 years 8 weeks ago

Aye they make a .700 Nitro NOW Laddie ;) I think Craig Boddington wrote aboot it recently . ( Cheesy Scots accent sorry!

.700 Nitro Express
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
.700 Nitro Express
Type Big Game Rifle
Place of origin United Kingdom
Production history
Designer Jim Bell / William Feldstein
Designed 1988
Manufacturer H&H
Produced 1988
Specifications
Bullet diameter .700 in (17.8 mm)
Neck diameter .728 in (18.5 mm)
Base diameter .780 in (19.8 mm)
Rim diameter .890 in (22.6 mm)
Case length 3.50 in (89 mm)
Overall length 4.20 in (107 mm)
Primer type Boxer
Ballistic performance
Bullet weight/type Velocity Energy
1,000 gr (65 g) SP 2,000 ft/s (610 m/s) 8,900 ft·lbf (12,100 J)
1,000 gr (65 g) SP 2,241 ft/s (683 m/s) 11,150 ft·lbf (15,120 J)
1,000 gr (65 g) SP 2,547 ft/s (776 m/s) 14,374 ft·lbf (19,489 J)
Source: Accurate Reloading [1]

The .700 Nitro Express is a big game rifle cartridge made by Holland & Holland, London, England. It was developed in 1988 by Jim Bell and William Feldstein and built by H&H. Feldstein had tried unsuccessfully to get H&H to build a .600 Nitro Express for him, but they had already ceased production. However, when Bell and Feldstein produced the entirely new .700 Nitro Express cartridge, they were able to attract the interest of H&H, who was looking for a new big-bore cartridge. After production began, the backlog of orders was so great that it continues to this time (2007) and H&H has even restarted the production of .600 Nitro Express guns. [2]
Contents
[hide]

* 1 Specifications
* 2 Ballistics
* 3 Comparable Calibers
* 4 See also
* 5 References
* 6 External links

[edit] Specifications

In many respects this cartridge parallels the .600 Nitro Express, in that it is essentially a scaled-up version of that cartridge, but is somewhat more powerful, and fires a heavier 1000-grain (64.8 g) bullet. The case itself is a completely new case, not simply another case resized. Double rifles are extremely expensive (many will sell for US $60,000 or much more in 2005 American currency) and have generally been replaced by magazine-rifle rounds like the .458 Winchester. Single factory loaded .700 Nitro cartridges are available, typically at $100 each, although they have been sold on the internet for as little as $50. This round, like many other big bore cartridges, can be hand reloaded, drastically reducing the cost - although few users are likely to expend much of this massively-recoiling ammunition.

While the .700 Nitro Express is sometimes claimed to be the "most powerful commercial round in the world", by the manufacturer, this is not exactly true. The .700 Nitro Express double rifle is only available on a custom order basis, and has never seen regular production, while the .585 Nyati which is built under similar circumstances is significantly more powerful. The .577 Tyrannosaur also develops more energy. Currently the most powerful rifle cartridge available on a commercial basis is the .50 BMG. It is also referred to as the most powerful sporting cartridge in the world. The largest caliber sporting cartridge is a wildcat 2 bore cartridge which fires a 3500 grain 1.326" diameter projectile generating 17500 ft-lbs of energy.
[edit] Ballistics

The .700 Nitro Express develops an approximate average of 8900 foot pounds (12 kJ) of muzzle energy with a 1,000 gr (65 g) bullet at 2,000 ft/s (610 m/s). However handloaders can push the cartridge to generate as much as 15,000 ft·lbf (20.3 kJ) in a modern bolt action, by using a 1,000 gr (65 g) bullet fired at 2,600 ft/s (792 m/s). However, doing so makes the action of the rifle used nearly inoperable (especially in the case of a boxlock or sidelock rifle), while at the same time rupturing the cartridge casing and the primer cap.

The typical average muzzle velocity of a factory-loaded cartridge is 2,000 ft/s (610 m/s). In the 14-pound rifle used by Accurate Reloading this would result in recoil energy of approximately 196 ft·lbf (266 J). This is more than ten times the average recoil from a .308 Winchester which is a very common hunting caliber, and more than twice the recoil of a strong .45-70 Government round.
.700 Nitro Express bullet and case with .45 ACP cartridge (centre) for comparison
[edit] Comparable Calibers

Shoulder-fired rifle calibers comparable to the .700 Nitro Express in terms of power and recoil include the following:

* .600 Nitro Express
* .600 Overkill
* .585 Gehringer
* .585 Nyati
* .577 Tyrannosaur
* .475 A&M Magnum
* .460 Weatherby Magnum
* .50 BMG

[edit] See also

* List of rifle cartridges

[edit] References

1. ^ .700 Nitro Express load data at Accurate Reloading
2. ^ Cartridges of the World 11th Edition, Book by Frank C. Barnes, Edited by Stan Skinner, Gun Digest Books, 2006, ISBN 0-89689-297-2 pp. 406, 409

[edit] External links

* .700 Nitro Express Photo

Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/.700_Nitro_Express"
Categories: Pistol and rifle cartridges
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+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Jere Smith wrote 4 years 8 weeks ago

Aye they make a .700 Nitro NOW Laddie ;) I think Craig Boddington wrote aboot it recently . ( Cheesy Scots accent sorry!

.700 Nitro Express
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
.700 Nitro Express
Type Big Game Rifle
Place of origin United Kingdom
Production history
Designer Jim Bell / William Feldstein
Designed 1988
Manufacturer H&H
Produced 1988
Specifications
Bullet diameter .700 in (17.8 mm)
Neck diameter .728 in (18.5 mm)
Base diameter .780 in (19.8 mm)
Rim diameter .890 in (22.6 mm)
Case length 3.50 in (89 mm)
Overall length 4.20 in (107 mm)
Primer type Boxer
Ballistic performance
Bullet weight/type Velocity Energy
1,000 gr (65 g) SP 2,000 ft/s (610 m/s) 8,900 ft·lbf (12,100 J)
1,000 gr (65 g) SP 2,241 ft/s (683 m/s) 11,150 ft·lbf (15,120 J)
1,000 gr (65 g) SP 2,547 ft/s (776 m/s) 14,374 ft·lbf (19,489 J)
Source: Accurate Reloading [1]

The .700 Nitro Express is a big game rifle cartridge made by Holland & Holland, London, England. It was developed in 1988 by Jim Bell and William Feldstein and built by H&H. Feldstein had tried unsuccessfully to get H&H to build a .600 Nitro Express for him, but they had already ceased production. However, when Bell and Feldstein produced the entirely new .700 Nitro Express cartridge, they were able to attract the interest of H&H, who was looking for a new big-bore cartridge. After production began, the backlog of orders was so great that it continues to this time (2007) and H&H has even restarted the production of .600 Nitro Express guns. [2]
Contents
[hide]

* 1 Specifications
* 2 Ballistics
* 3 Comparable Calibers
* 4 See also
* 5 References
* 6 External links

[edit] Specifications

In many respects this cartridge parallels the .600 Nitro Express, in that it is essentially a scaled-up version of that cartridge, but is somewhat more powerful, and fires a heavier 1000-grain (64.8 g) bullet. The case itself is a completely new case, not simply another case resized. Double rifles are extremely expensive (many will sell for US $60,000 or much more in 2005 American currency) and have generally been replaced by magazine-rifle rounds like the .458 Winchester. Single factory loaded .700 Nitro cartridges are available, typically at $100 each, although they have been sold on the internet for as little as $50. This round, like many other big bore cartridges, can be hand reloaded, drastically reducing the cost - although few users are likely to expend much of this massively-recoiling ammunition.

While the .700 Nitro Express is sometimes claimed to be the "most powerful commercial round in the world", by the manufacturer, this is not exactly true. The .700 Nitro Express double rifle is only available on a custom order basis, and has never seen regular production, while the .585 Nyati which is built under similar circumstances is significantly more powerful. The .577 Tyrannosaur also develops more energy. Currently the most powerful rifle cartridge available on a commercial basis is the .50 BMG. It is also referred to as the most powerful sporting cartridge in the world. The largest caliber sporting cartridge is a wildcat 2 bore cartridge which fires a 3500 grain 1.326" diameter projectile generating 17500 ft-lbs of energy.
[edit] Ballistics

The .700 Nitro Express develops an approximate average of 8900 foot pounds (12 kJ) of muzzle energy with a 1,000 gr (65 g) bullet at 2,000 ft/s (610 m/s). However handloaders can push the cartridge to generate as much as 15,000 ft·lbf (20.3 kJ) in a modern bolt action, by using a 1,000 gr (65 g) bullet fired at 2,600 ft/s (792 m/s). However, doing so makes the action of the rifle used nearly inoperable (especially in the case of a boxlock or sidelock rifle), while at the same time rupturing the cartridge casing and the primer cap.

The typical average muzzle velocity of a factory-loaded cartridge is 2,000 ft/s (610 m/s). In the 14-pound rifle used by Accurate Reloading this would result in recoil energy of approximately 196 ft·lbf (266 J). This is more than ten times the average recoil from a .308 Winchester which is a very common hunting caliber, and more than twice the recoil of a strong .45-70 Government round.
.700 Nitro Express bullet and case with .45 ACP cartridge (centre) for comparison
[edit] Comparable Calibers

Shoulder-fired rifle calibers comparable to the .700 Nitro Express in terms of power and recoil include the following:

* .600 Nitro Express
* .600 Overkill
* .585 Gehringer
* .585 Nyati
* .577 Tyrannosaur
* .475 A&M Magnum
* .460 Weatherby Magnum
* .50 BMG

[edit] See also

* List of rifle cartridges

[edit] References

1. ^ .700 Nitro Express load data at Accurate Reloading
2. ^ Cartridges of the World 11th Edition, Book by Frank C. Barnes, Edited by Stan Skinner, Gun Digest Books, 2006, ISBN 0-89689-297-2 pp. 406, 409

[edit] External links

* .700 Nitro Express Photo

Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/.700_Nitro_Express"
Categories: Pistol and rifle cartridges
Views

* Article
* Discussion
* Edit this page
* History

Personal tools

* Try Beta
* Log in / create account

Navigation

* Main page
* Contents
* Featured content
* Current events
* Random article

Search

Interaction

* About Wikipedia
* Community portal
* Recent changes
* Contact Wikipedia
* Donate to Wikipedia
* Help

Toolbox

* What links here
* Related changes
* Upload file
* Special pages
* Printable version
* Permanent link
* Cite this page

Languages

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Powered by MediaWiki
Wikimedia Foundation

* This page was last modified on 6 February 2010 at 07:47.
* Text is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. See Terms of Use for details.
Wikipedia® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., a non-profit organization.
* Contact us
* Priv

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Jere Smith wrote 4 years 8 weeks ago

Sorry for the double 'puter acting up!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Jere Smith wrote 4 years 8 weeks ago

If this works it shows a 700 Nitro Exp being fired.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6-hbyCewako

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Jere Smith wrote 4 years 8 weeks ago

If this works it shows 700 Nitro Exp Elephant Kills

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6-hbyCewako

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from WA Mtnhunter wrote 4 years 8 weeks ago

I don't need one, but want and need are entirely different! Wow, what a nice rifle.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from O Garcia wrote 4 years 8 weeks ago

actually the men who fired .577s and .600s at game weren't NFL offensive linemen either, but normally proportioned gentlemen who were facing monstrous animals that could only be stopped one way, by firing the equally brutish rifle. adrenaline reduces recoil to almost nothing.

as TE Lawrence once said (about putting out lit matches with his hands), "of course, it hurts. The key is not minding that it hurts."

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Clay Cooper wrote 4 years 8 weeks ago

His work is immaculate?

No, it's "PERFECTION AT ITS FINEST!"

You just don't see attention to detail like this anymore. Sad to say, Craftsmanship like this is becoming a lost Art and very rare to find!!

I got to say, this Master of Masters of Craftsman takes Gun Smithing to its ultimate level and well worth the price!

As a European Firearms Manufacturer was visiting another Manufacturer here in the United States, the US Manufacturer swelled up in pride and asked the European Gentleman a question? What do you think of US Firearms??

He responded with one word.

UNFINISHED!

Sad but true, even to this date!
Manufacturers sale firearms and other goods like a house. It's not the quality of the house, it's the square footage!

Stick that between your cheek and gum for a while, you'll eventually get it!

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Clay Cooper wrote 4 years 8 weeks ago

$ancy $uns just don't fascinate me!

Accuracy and innovation is what catches my attention that I salivate for!

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Clay Cooper wrote 4 years 8 weeks ago

Sir Bill Ruger, Owner and founder of Ruger firearms, God rest is sole a fine Gentleman developed the Ruger #3 in 45-70. One day he decided to test just to see how much pressure and abuse the rifle can withstand. He loaded it so hot, it busted the stock in three places and melted the case in the chamber!

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from davidpetzal wrote 4 years 8 weeks ago

To DickGun: I agree absolutely. Considering the degree of artistic and mechanical skill they have to bring to the job, gun builders are the most underpaid people in the world.

To Tom-Tom: No idea what you're talking about. Re-phrase. Get a grip.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Woodgrub wrote 4 years 8 weeks ago

Back to the issue of recoil, and checkered or uncheckered bolt knobs. My Win M70 in .375 H&H with synthetic stock seems to kick more than my Rem 700 in .416 Rem with synthetic stock-----------don't know why. Also, I filed the checkering off the Remington bolt knob very carefully, while maintaining the basic shape of the knob, finished it in-the-white with 600 grit emery paper and polishing compound. Turned out great, looks great, and functions great. Couldn't be happier with it.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from WA Mtnhunter wrote 4 years 8 weeks ago

davidpetzal

Please redirect the attention some of our most prestigious posters to Phil's previous post "Weary ducks, bucks, and gobblers" or the link to the catalog and text below:

http://highered.mcgraw-hill.com/sites/0072818905/

If I do it, I'll face teh wrap of a tousund flammers.

Cheers,
WMH

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from WA Mtnhunter wrote 4 years 8 weeks ago

Woodgrub

I had a Winchester M-70 .338 Win Mag with synthetic stock that kicked like a rented mule. Got rid of that dude. Could not explain why it kicked more than other .338's I had fired, but it had to go since I could not support an orthopedic surgeon and rehab on my meager salary.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Jere Smith wrote 4 years 8 weeks ago

Now this one should be the Elephat Kill with a 700 Nitro!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hUi8cKo9dNI&feature=related

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Riflemakers Wife wrote 4 years 8 weeks ago

Hi Guy's
Just a note to say thanks for all the great compliments. Ryan is a Great Guy and loves what he does. He has been building for 28 years now and have been going to Reno SCI for about 12. Thank's to our Great client and better friend Mike Miller, MJMillerjewelers in Barrington Ill.
If you have any questions on a custom build and pricing I would be happy to address them on our contact forms on our web page www.rbbigbores.com.
Yes Ryan makes most of his own parts including the large custom box to hold a few extra rounds. just in case?
Thanks again I have enjoyed reading all your comets, We moved to Idaho a bit over 4 years ago and love the hunting frendly state...

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from Riflemakers Wife wrote 4 years 8 weeks ago

wonderning if anyone could tell me who Dickgun DP is we are still very close with Gil Van Horn. and would like to tell him about you?

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from O Garcia wrote 4 years 8 weeks ago

now that proper magnum actions are available and [relatively] cheap, nobody seems to be complaining much about the extra 1/3" bolt throw anymore. It wasn't long ago when your highly-respected gunwriter and premier authority would tell you that your elephant cartridge needs to fit in a .30-06 length action because that extra 1/3" of bolt throw bothered him and his allied minds who were used to working the action for the 2nd shot with just a flip of their wrists. Hence the .458 Win.

Now apparently we have no problems with "magnum-length" .458 Lotts, .416 Rigbys and now the .505. I mean, the .505 Gibbs is BIG, much bigger and longer than even the .416 Rigby, the round where the need for a true magnum action usually begins.

Maybe there was no problem with the longer throw after all.

Now, in fairness to Jim C. (sorry Dave, couldn't resist), even though he was a champion of the "30-06 length" big gun, spec. the .458 Win, in his most famous work "The Book of the Rifle" he did state that in a worst case situation, hunting elephants in thick, thorny cover of Central African/West African-type jungle, where visibility is measured in inches and the elephant could literally be on top of you, his ideal rifle would be built on a Brevex magnum Mauser, and in .460 Weatherby (this was 1981, and the .460 Wby was the most powerful bolt gun round readily available), so that he could smite the elephant the way a .300 Wby smacks a rodent.

So I repeat, maybe there was no problem with the longer throw after all.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Happy Myles wrote 4 years 8 weeks ago

My experience indicates long bolt throw issues are mostly pilot error and would have happened with a shorter throw. Also, gun writers have to make a living too. In the deep jungle of Cameroon I have used the following bolt action long throws with no problems. 416 Rigby, 450 Ackley, 500 Jeffery, all on forest elephant.

cameroon

+4 Good Comment? | | Report
from Zermoid wrote 4 years 8 weeks ago

OOOOooooooo........
Just the thought makes both my shoulder and wallet hurt.......

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from 99explorer wrote 4 years 8 weeks ago

That is truly a museum piece.
On the subject of bolt knobs, I am reminded that the late great Jack O'Connor once had his right thumb broken while chambering a round, because he gripped the bolt knob between his thumb and forefinger while cycling the action. For some reason, the round went off before he could lock the bolt and it came straight back.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Tom in CA wrote 4 years 8 weeks ago

I am a PH in Zim and have the pleasure of seeing the 505 in action on charging tuskless cows and also a great eleohant bull in frontal confrontation, it truly is the calibre of choice for jumbo. I have seen a few of Ryans rifles and also get to see a great number of big bores rifles.
Without a doubt the Breeding is the finest out there if you are not a double rifle nut as I am then all I can say is that Ryans work is the Holland and Holland of bolt action bar none remember I have seen them doing what they are made to do.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from davidpetzal wrote 4 years 8 weeks ago

To Riflemakers Wife: E-mail me at Field & Stream and I will see what I can do.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Riflemakers Wife wrote 4 years 7 weeks ago

Thank you Tom in Ca
I always let Ryan know what nice things all you Guy's say it always makes a wonderful Day. He works in his work shop all Day everyday by him self to get all these project done for our clients and friends. It's always Great to here From people out in the field.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Gunslinger wrote 4 years 7 weeks ago

I wan' one, WHY no reasn, just want it. I got a Custom apparently he built, as no caliber and no name only intials stamed in the metal. It's the most beautful wood I ever saw, work manship is flawless. Now that I weight about l28 lbs, who's gonna hold me up to shot it and unless i go to africia, got no use for it, other than I want it. A beautiful piece of firearm, wish ws in my safe,

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Riflemakers Wife wrote 4 years 7 weeks ago

Hi Gunslinger
I'm wondering about that custom that you think might be one of Ryan's Rifle's Who's was it and when and where did you get it? I am always curoius about the first Rifle's who has them and where they are? you can call or e-mail me at www.Toni@rbbigbores.com or go to rbbigbores.com and get our number. Thank's to anyone that can let Gunslinger I would like to contact him...

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from hillphoto wrote 4 years 7 weeks ago

I have had the pleasure of working with Ryan and photographing his latest rifles. He does truly beautiful work. Check out some of the images we did just last week: http://hillphoto208.blogspot.com/2010/02/lets-shoot_22.html
Ryan's rifles are a testament to his attention to detail.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from woodley wrote 4 years 6 weeks ago

Just joined up here from Zim thanks to Tom, every time we get back to camp from a day in the field the Gibbs would be inspected by me and all fingerprints removed ready for the next day. It is truly the African Classic.
Dan and I got stuck into a herd of Ellie cows and I stood back and watched as he began to deplete the herd with precision, he is not a big man but fired that 505 with absolute confidence hence we took 7 Cows in less than a minute. The balance was perfect and the recoil similar to my 458 LOTT, Ryan is a master and I am working my way towards owning one of these works of art, if you want to hunt Elephant, buff, hippo, you know the big stuff you have to call and place your order.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Kalahari wrote 4 years 4 weeks ago

Hi to all you Big Bore enthusiasts. We have a club in South Africa that's primary focus is shooting your big bore on a regular basis. We host a practical shoot on a bi-monthly basis and at one of those shoots you will see more big game rifles in use than most of you would see in a lifetime. Go to www.bigbore.org for details. I have never had so much fun in any shooting doctrine from Combat, Tactical,Clays to High Power Silhouette and anything in between. trust me I have tried them. The shoot concepts are to ensure you become familiar with your rifle and that it functions flawlessly as we live on a continent that does not favour fools. I believe that this shooting format should be copied and introduced to USA to get you shooting your big bores. Then all of you saying you have no use for one will have a valid excuse. The more you shoot the cheaper these components will get for us all. I need help on .416 Rem cases. I make cases from .375 H&H but cannot get through the borders with a different headstamp.
Just competed in a shoot this past Saturday and can't wait for the next.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from whiskeyrunner wrote 4 years 1 week ago

I have known ryan for over 20 years. I have 3 of his early works of PERFECTION. Because of physical problems and shooting rifle left handed it posed a small problem making a 30-06 for me. He did it with his usual perfection. Left handed cheek plate and right handed bolt lever. This rifle is so accurate it is unbleiveable. The other rifles he did for me were rebuilds of 94 winchesters. When people look at them they just stand and stare. Anyoue wanting a custom rifle made needs to go to Ryan at RBBIGBORES he makes the best in the world. You cant go wrong going to him and getting your new custom rifle.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from walnutstock wrote 3 years 43 weeks ago

Thank you Mr Petzal. Always enjoy your articles. Absolutely beautiful rifle, have no need for it, could never afford it nor the ammunition.
Just happy for the folks who get to use it.
Heaviest calibres I have ever fired were .375 H&H Mag and Govt 45/70 which surprisingly were nowhere as horrendous as I expected-I'm not saying they were light either but in a life and death situation I could hopefully hold my own with them.
However, just thinking about the .505 Gibbs, is already giving me the dreaded flinch!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from HuntingJess wrote 3 years 13 weeks ago

This is a beautiful weapon. There is nothing like the craftsmanship of a well made rifle. I swear, this is like a work of art to me. There was a guy that owned an indianapolis roofing company that had a rifle just like this one. I loved to admire that thing.

0 Good Comment? | | Report

Post a Comment

from Armchair Mike wrote 4 years 8 weeks ago

I have absolutely no need for such a rifle. That said, I REALLY want one.

+10 Good Comment? | | Report
from Mike Diehl wrote 4 years 8 weeks ago

Beautiful rifle. Unimaginably horrible recoil. Do you provide your own orthopedic surgeon on those African hunts or do they come with the package deal?

+6 Good Comment? | | Report
from Happy Myles wrote 4 years 8 weeks ago

Another great booth I missed at SCI. Your comments all make good sense. The various misadventures you mentioned have all happened to me at one time or other floor plate falling open, hoods disappearing upon recoil, open sight issues, rifle not heavy enough, etc etc. Over time they all get ironed out with experience. Sounds like Mr Breeding has done this from the ground up. So often you see something like a 500 Jeffery put together as if it were a 300 H & H.

+4 Good Comment? | | Report
from Happy Myles wrote 4 years 8 weeks ago

I just noticed another thing I liked on this rifle. The bolt knob is polished, not checked. Checkering on the knob does not help, it just takes the hide off your finger while shooting really big bore bolt rifles.

+4 Good Comment? | | Report
from Happy Myles wrote 4 years 8 weeks ago

My experience indicates long bolt throw issues are mostly pilot error and would have happened with a shorter throw. Also, gun writers have to make a living too. In the deep jungle of Cameroon I have used the following bolt action long throws with no problems. 416 Rigby, 450 Ackley, 500 Jeffery, all on forest elephant.

cameroon

+4 Good Comment? | | Report
from Douglas wrote 4 years 8 weeks ago

A handsome rifle indeed. Any ideas on price?
(yea, I know, if ya gotta ask, you can't afford one...)

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from alabamaoutlaw wrote 4 years 8 weeks ago

If you get a chance go to youtube and watch the little muslims shooting the 505 it is hilarous to watch them.Better them than me.Awesome recoil from the 505 Rifle.But the Turkish walnut does not add to the rifle it just doesn't have the pop.I'm like everybody else and can't afford be can admire the craftsmanship.
Thanks Petzal

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from WA Mtnhunter wrote 4 years 8 weeks ago

Why anyone checkers a bolt knob is beyond me. Who grips them on that little checkering Remington puts on there anyway? Like holding a bone china tea cup for sissies!

Proper working of a bolt requires the palm and inside of the fingers held together. Never do you "grip" the bolt except for removal for cleaning. Weatherby bolts are polished and are machined from one solid piece of steel with the bolt. Nothing to be connected, just one homogeneous (big word for Arkansas) piece of steel.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from Carney wrote 4 years 8 weeks ago

Love the looks of it! When I can afford a trip to Africa I'll buy one...

Anyone know anything about the Russian company, Tzar Canon? Just saw an article that they are planning to enter the Amertican market...

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from dickgun wrote 4 years 8 weeks ago

DP,
One of my long time clients (primarily for bear) is also a man who goes back to a lot of hunting in Africa with old timers like Lew Gaimes when the Rhodesian war in (now) Zimbabwe was gearing up and before.
He has a closet full of rifles made by Van Horn and still has him building two rifles - mostly to keep the old gun maker involved and have an income. Many may think that builders, like Van Horn, are rich men, but the fact is that most small custom builders like that are not. Like classic musicians they, more often than not, worked for the art more than for the money. Van Horn's rifles are, in my opinion, of the best every made for a serious hunter of dangerous game.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from Riflemakers Wife wrote 4 years 8 weeks ago

Hi Guy's
Just a note to say thanks for all the great compliments. Ryan is a Great Guy and loves what he does. He has been building for 28 years now and have been going to Reno SCI for about 12. Thank's to our Great client and better friend Mike Miller, MJMillerjewelers in Barrington Ill.
If you have any questions on a custom build and pricing I would be happy to address them on our contact forms on our web page www.rbbigbores.com.
Yes Ryan makes most of his own parts including the large custom box to hold a few extra rounds. just in case?
Thanks again I have enjoyed reading all your comets, We moved to Idaho a bit over 4 years ago and love the hunting frendly state...

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from Tom in CA wrote 4 years 8 weeks ago

I am a PH in Zim and have the pleasure of seeing the 505 in action on charging tuskless cows and also a great eleohant bull in frontal confrontation, it truly is the calibre of choice for jumbo. I have seen a few of Ryans rifles and also get to see a great number of big bores rifles.
Without a doubt the Breeding is the finest out there if you are not a double rifle nut as I am then all I can say is that Ryans work is the Holland and Holland of bolt action bar none remember I have seen them doing what they are made to do.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from blackdawgz wrote 4 years 8 weeks ago

Great article. This is a major reason I read this magazine.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from RichardF wrote 4 years 8 weeks ago

I want one. The scary thing is that after scourig his website I did not find any prices so I am sure they are WAY out of my range.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from MLH wrote 4 years 8 weeks ago

I might never need a true big bore stopper but I just want one. That's a brute of a rifle. Just looked through his site - a .585 Express!

He put a lot of thought and pride into the design. I wish more makers would add a locked floorplate release, but that adds cost.

The price is flagrantly missing from your post. Some may say that if you have to ask you can't afford it. I like the story of a customer that was looking at an exotic car. He asked the price and the salesman gave him that line. The customer replied, "I can afford it because I ask." He bought the car - from a different salesman.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from jbird wrote 4 years 8 weeks ago

I'd love to shoot it, probably just once.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from TJ wrote 4 years 8 weeks ago

I want one so bad!!!!!!! I would like a laminate stock, benefits of synthetic with look of wood. Also a screw off muzzle break.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Mjenkins1 wrote 4 years 8 weeks ago

Could someone please tell me what 93 foot pounds of recoil might feel like?? I just cant relate to that. The biggest thing ive shot was a .300 wby mag.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from davidpetzal wrote 4 years 8 weeks ago

To Mjenkins1: The biggest rifle I've ever shot was a .577 Westley Richards double that probably kicked about as much as the .505, all things considered. It was a huge shove that set me backpedaling. It didn't hurt, but I ended up a few feet to the rear of where I started out. The guns that really hurt are the one that put a big powder charge behind a 300-400 grain bullet. They come back at you so fast that there is no way to roll with the recoil. They can do anything from raise bruises to break blood vessels to break collarbones.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from TJ wrote 4 years 8 weeks ago

For comparison a 30-06 is around 22ftlbs of recoil

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Beekeeper wrote 4 years 8 weeks ago

Beautiful work!

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Mjenkins1 wrote 4 years 8 weeks ago

Thanks for the description davidpetzal. You know what they say: it's not fun if you're not breakin' blood vessels or collarbones.... right?

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from ggmack wrote 4 years 8 weeks ago

while I have never meet a situation my 300 Win Mag could not handle,I feel an overwhelming desire to buy one with a synthetic stock.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Ralph the Rifleman wrote 4 years 8 weeks ago

Looks like a nicely made hand held cannon!
I still would truely like a double rifle in .458 Lott, however; If I could truely fill my BIG GUN wishes.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Ruckweiler wrote 4 years 8 weeks ago

Well built beast of a rifle. Reminds me of the story I read years ago where a big game hunter long ago was asked why he shot a .600 Nitro Express. I believe he answered,"Because they don't make a .700 Nitro Express. laddie." Don't know if that's true or not but this rifle epitomizes the idea, "If some is good, more is better." BOOM!

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Happy Myles wrote 4 years 8 weeks ago

Jim in Mo,
Terry told me at Dallas Safari Club he would not be at SCI in Reno, instead would be quail hunting, as I recall.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from idduckhntr wrote 4 years 8 weeks ago

CZ makes a 505 Gibbs and 416 Rigby, I have one in 375H&H and love it. But it does'nt have the wood that beauty does.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from elmer f. wrote 4 years 8 weeks ago

i wonder if 505 gibbs is to much gun for white tails?!

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from O Garcia wrote 4 years 8 weeks ago

actually the men who fired .577s and .600s at game weren't NFL offensive linemen either, but normally proportioned gentlemen who were facing monstrous animals that could only be stopped one way, by firing the equally brutish rifle. adrenaline reduces recoil to almost nothing.

as TE Lawrence once said (about putting out lit matches with his hands), "of course, it hurts. The key is not minding that it hurts."

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Clay Cooper wrote 4 years 8 weeks ago

His work is immaculate?

No, it's "PERFECTION AT ITS FINEST!"

You just don't see attention to detail like this anymore. Sad to say, Craftsmanship like this is becoming a lost Art and very rare to find!!

I got to say, this Master of Masters of Craftsman takes Gun Smithing to its ultimate level and well worth the price!

As a European Firearms Manufacturer was visiting another Manufacturer here in the United States, the US Manufacturer swelled up in pride and asked the European Gentleman a question? What do you think of US Firearms??

He responded with one word.

UNFINISHED!

Sad but true, even to this date!
Manufacturers sale firearms and other goods like a house. It's not the quality of the house, it's the square footage!

Stick that between your cheek and gum for a while, you'll eventually get it!

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Clay Cooper wrote 4 years 8 weeks ago

$ancy $uns just don't fascinate me!

Accuracy and innovation is what catches my attention that I salivate for!

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Clay Cooper wrote 4 years 8 weeks ago

Sir Bill Ruger, Owner and founder of Ruger firearms, God rest is sole a fine Gentleman developed the Ruger #3 in 45-70. One day he decided to test just to see how much pressure and abuse the rifle can withstand. He loaded it so hot, it busted the stock in three places and melted the case in the chamber!

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Ralph the Rifleman wrote 4 years 8 weeks ago

Sorry about the "truely" twice..

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Jim in Mo wrote 4 years 8 weeks ago

Dave, did you see Terry Wieland at the show? I'm reading his new book DGR II. This rifle looks as one he would call a solid working bolt rifle as he did a 458 Lott built by Edwin von Atzigen at 10 1/2lbs.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from crm3006 wrote 4 years 8 weeks ago

Nice, for a bolt gun. I'm holding out for the J.Rigby double rifle in .470 NE. I need neither one, but a dream is a dream!

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Jim in Mo wrote 4 years 8 weeks ago

Dave,
PS, by looking at the belly (mag) of that gun did Granite Arms build it on an Enfield P17 action?

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from ricefarm wrote 4 years 8 weeks ago

If it takes that big of a gun to kill it, I don't want to meet it.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from davidpetzal wrote 4 years 8 weeks ago

To Jim in MO: Nope, Granite builds them from scratch. To get four of those monster rounds in the magazine, it has to look the way it does. I didn't see Terry at the show; he was off quail hunting. But I have read DGR II, and it's high on the must list for anyone who's interested in big guns.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Happy Myles wrote 4 years 8 weeks ago

Jim in Mo
Whoops, sorry did not realize Dave had already answered your question

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Jim in Mo wrote 4 years 8 weeks ago

Happy, good to hear from you. My, my. Off quail hunting. There was a time we (my family) had a fair amount of quail to hunt at our country home next to my grandfathers farm. The next landowners wiped out all cover, which decimated the quail.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from IowaGuy wrote 4 years 8 weeks ago

Man, unless you played offensive tackle in the NFL, can't imagine anyone (able to stay) standing up to the recoil of this monster. Interesting article and rifle, some real workmanship went into it.

If they clone dinosaurs someday, I'll have an excuse to tell the wife why I need one a .505.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Tom in CA wrote 4 years 8 weeks ago

Ryan's rifles are near perfection, both in function and form. Workmanship is impeccable. I am lucky enough to have a .416 Rigby and a .505 Gibbs. At 50 yds., from a bench, each will put 3 shots and probably more for the very determined, into a centered hole barely larger than the caliber of the bullet. They perform and do it in rare style.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from ricefarm wrote 4 years 8 weeks ago

After shooting this dinosaur killer the old 30-06 would feel like a .22. Assuming your shoulder wasn't completely unhinged.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from jwallen wrote 4 years 8 weeks ago

Beastly and elegant, just like the game it is intended for. This thing just oozes capability.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Jere Smith wrote 4 years 8 weeks ago

Aye they make a .700 Nitro NOW Laddie ;) I think Craig Boddington wrote aboot it recently . ( Cheesy Scots accent sorry!

.700 Nitro Express
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
.700 Nitro Express
Type Big Game Rifle
Place of origin United Kingdom
Production history
Designer Jim Bell / William Feldstein
Designed 1988
Manufacturer H&H
Produced 1988
Specifications
Bullet diameter .700 in (17.8 mm)
Neck diameter .728 in (18.5 mm)
Base diameter .780 in (19.8 mm)
Rim diameter .890 in (22.6 mm)
Case length 3.50 in (89 mm)
Overall length 4.20 in (107 mm)
Primer type Boxer
Ballistic performance
Bullet weight/type Velocity Energy
1,000 gr (65 g) SP 2,000 ft/s (610 m/s) 8,900 ft·lbf (12,100 J)
1,000 gr (65 g) SP 2,241 ft/s (683 m/s) 11,150 ft·lbf (15,120 J)
1,000 gr (65 g) SP 2,547 ft/s (776 m/s) 14,374 ft·lbf (19,489 J)
Source: Accurate Reloading [1]

The .700 Nitro Express is a big game rifle cartridge made by Holland & Holland, London, England. It was developed in 1988 by Jim Bell and William Feldstein and built by H&H. Feldstein had tried unsuccessfully to get H&H to build a .600 Nitro Express for him, but they had already ceased production. However, when Bell and Feldstein produced the entirely new .700 Nitro Express cartridge, they were able to attract the interest of H&H, who was looking for a new big-bore cartridge. After production began, the backlog of orders was so great that it continues to this time (2007) and H&H has even restarted the production of .600 Nitro Express guns. [2]
Contents
[hide]

* 1 Specifications
* 2 Ballistics
* 3 Comparable Calibers
* 4 See also
* 5 References
* 6 External links

[edit] Specifications

In many respects this cartridge parallels the .600 Nitro Express, in that it is essentially a scaled-up version of that cartridge, but is somewhat more powerful, and fires a heavier 1000-grain (64.8 g) bullet. The case itself is a completely new case, not simply another case resized. Double rifles are extremely expensive (many will sell for US $60,000 or much more in 2005 American currency) and have generally been replaced by magazine-rifle rounds like the .458 Winchester. Single factory loaded .700 Nitro cartridges are available, typically at $100 each, although they have been sold on the internet for as little as $50. This round, like many other big bore cartridges, can be hand reloaded, drastically reducing the cost - although few users are likely to expend much of this massively-recoiling ammunition.

While the .700 Nitro Express is sometimes claimed to be the "most powerful commercial round in the world", by the manufacturer, this is not exactly true. The .700 Nitro Express double rifle is only available on a custom order basis, and has never seen regular production, while the .585 Nyati which is built under similar circumstances is significantly more powerful. The .577 Tyrannosaur also develops more energy. Currently the most powerful rifle cartridge available on a commercial basis is the .50 BMG. It is also referred to as the most powerful sporting cartridge in the world. The largest caliber sporting cartridge is a wildcat 2 bore cartridge which fires a 3500 grain 1.326" diameter projectile generating 17500 ft-lbs of energy.
[edit] Ballistics

The .700 Nitro Express develops an approximate average of 8900 foot pounds (12 kJ) of muzzle energy with a 1,000 gr (65 g) bullet at 2,000 ft/s (610 m/s). However handloaders can push the cartridge to generate as much as 15,000 ft·lbf (20.3 kJ) in a modern bolt action, by using a 1,000 gr (65 g) bullet fired at 2,600 ft/s (792 m/s). However, doing so makes the action of the rifle used nearly inoperable (especially in the case of a boxlock or sidelock rifle), while at the same time rupturing the cartridge casing and the primer cap.

The typical average muzzle velocity of a factory-loaded cartridge is 2,000 ft/s (610 m/s). In the 14-pound rifle used by Accurate Reloading this would result in recoil energy of approximately 196 ft·lbf (266 J). This is more than ten times the average recoil from a .308 Winchester which is a very common hunting caliber, and more than twice the recoil of a strong .45-70 Government round.
.700 Nitro Express bullet and case with .45 ACP cartridge (centre) for comparison
[edit] Comparable Calibers

Shoulder-fired rifle calibers comparable to the .700 Nitro Express in terms of power and recoil include the following:

* .600 Nitro Express
* .600 Overkill
* .585 Gehringer
* .585 Nyati
* .577 Tyrannosaur
* .475 A&M Magnum
* .460 Weatherby Magnum
* .50 BMG

[edit] See also

* List of rifle cartridges

[edit] References

1. ^ .700 Nitro Express load data at Accurate Reloading
2. ^ Cartridges of the World 11th Edition, Book by Frank C. Barnes, Edited by Stan Skinner, Gun Digest Books, 2006, ISBN 0-89689-297-2 pp. 406, 409

[edit] External links

* .700 Nitro Express Photo

Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/.700_Nitro_Express"
Categories: Pistol and rifle cartridges
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+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from WA Mtnhunter wrote 4 years 8 weeks ago

I don't need one, but want and need are entirely different! Wow, what a nice rifle.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from davidpetzal wrote 4 years 8 weeks ago

To DickGun: I agree absolutely. Considering the degree of artistic and mechanical skill they have to bring to the job, gun builders are the most underpaid people in the world.

To Tom-Tom: No idea what you're talking about. Re-phrase. Get a grip.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Woodgrub wrote 4 years 8 weeks ago

Back to the issue of recoil, and checkered or uncheckered bolt knobs. My Win M70 in .375 H&H with synthetic stock seems to kick more than my Rem 700 in .416 Rem with synthetic stock-----------don't know why. Also, I filed the checkering off the Remington bolt knob very carefully, while maintaining the basic shape of the knob, finished it in-the-white with 600 grit emery paper and polishing compound. Turned out great, looks great, and functions great. Couldn't be happier with it.

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from WA Mtnhunter wrote 4 years 8 weeks ago

davidpetzal

Please redirect the attention some of our most prestigious posters to Phil's previous post "Weary ducks, bucks, and gobblers" or the link to the catalog and text below:

http://highered.mcgraw-hill.com/sites/0072818905/

If I do it, I'll face teh wrap of a tousund flammers.

Cheers,
WMH

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from WA Mtnhunter wrote 4 years 8 weeks ago

Woodgrub

I had a Winchester M-70 .338 Win Mag with synthetic stock that kicked like a rented mule. Got rid of that dude. Could not explain why it kicked more than other .338's I had fired, but it had to go since I could not support an orthopedic surgeon and rehab on my meager salary.

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from Riflemakers Wife wrote 4 years 8 weeks ago

wonderning if anyone could tell me who Dickgun DP is we are still very close with Gil Van Horn. and would like to tell him about you?

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from O Garcia wrote 4 years 8 weeks ago

now that proper magnum actions are available and [relatively] cheap, nobody seems to be complaining much about the extra 1/3" bolt throw anymore. It wasn't long ago when your highly-respected gunwriter and premier authority would tell you that your elephant cartridge needs to fit in a .30-06 length action because that extra 1/3" of bolt throw bothered him and his allied minds who were used to working the action for the 2nd shot with just a flip of their wrists. Hence the .458 Win.

Now apparently we have no problems with "magnum-length" .458 Lotts, .416 Rigbys and now the .505. I mean, the .505 Gibbs is BIG, much bigger and longer than even the .416 Rigby, the round where the need for a true magnum action usually begins.

Maybe there was no problem with the longer throw after all.

Now, in fairness to Jim C. (sorry Dave, couldn't resist), even though he was a champion of the "30-06 length" big gun, spec. the .458 Win, in his most famous work "The Book of the Rifle" he did state that in a worst case situation, hunting elephants in thick, thorny cover of Central African/West African-type jungle, where visibility is measured in inches and the elephant could literally be on top of you, his ideal rifle would be built on a Brevex magnum Mauser, and in .460 Weatherby (this was 1981, and the .460 Wby was the most powerful bolt gun round readily available), so that he could smite the elephant the way a .300 Wby smacks a rodent.

So I repeat, maybe there was no problem with the longer throw after all.

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from Zermoid wrote 4 years 8 weeks ago

OOOOooooooo........
Just the thought makes both my shoulder and wallet hurt.......

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from davidpetzal wrote 4 years 8 weeks ago

To Riflemakers Wife: E-mail me at Field & Stream and I will see what I can do.

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from Riflemakers Wife wrote 4 years 7 weeks ago

Thank you Tom in Ca
I always let Ryan know what nice things all you Guy's say it always makes a wonderful Day. He works in his work shop all Day everyday by him self to get all these project done for our clients and friends. It's always Great to here From people out in the field.

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from Tom-Tom wrote 4 years 8 weeks ago

Dave, help me out here...didn't the Winchester catalog offer an African rifle back in the mid 1950's, advertised as a lion finishing rifle? It looked magnificant, total artistry in function and form, but only offered in .22LR. Hunting dangerous game in Africa is but a dream for most of us. Other than admiring the beauty of such rifles, when not in Africa one could, at the very least, use the Winchester on squirrels.

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from Jere Smith wrote 4 years 8 weeks ago

Aye they make a .700 Nitro NOW Laddie ;) I think Craig Boddington wrote aboot it recently . ( Cheesy Scots accent sorry!

.700 Nitro Express
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
.700 Nitro Express
Type Big Game Rifle
Place of origin United Kingdom
Production history
Designer Jim Bell / William Feldstein
Designed 1988
Manufacturer H&H
Produced 1988
Specifications
Bullet diameter .700 in (17.8 mm)
Neck diameter .728 in (18.5 mm)
Base diameter .780 in (19.8 mm)
Rim diameter .890 in (22.6 mm)
Case length 3.50 in (89 mm)
Overall length 4.20 in (107 mm)
Primer type Boxer
Ballistic performance
Bullet weight/type Velocity Energy
1,000 gr (65 g) SP 2,000 ft/s (610 m/s) 8,900 ft·lbf (12,100 J)
1,000 gr (65 g) SP 2,241 ft/s (683 m/s) 11,150 ft·lbf (15,120 J)
1,000 gr (65 g) SP 2,547 ft/s (776 m/s) 14,374 ft·lbf (19,489 J)
Source: Accurate Reloading [1]

The .700 Nitro Express is a big game rifle cartridge made by Holland & Holland, London, England. It was developed in 1988 by Jim Bell and William Feldstein and built by H&H. Feldstein had tried unsuccessfully to get H&H to build a .600 Nitro Express for him, but they had already ceased production. However, when Bell and Feldstein produced the entirely new .700 Nitro Express cartridge, they were able to attract the interest of H&H, who was looking for a new big-bore cartridge. After production began, the backlog of orders was so great that it continues to this time (2007) and H&H has even restarted the production of .600 Nitro Express guns. [2]
Contents
[hide]

* 1 Specifications
* 2 Ballistics
* 3 Comparable Calibers
* 4 See also
* 5 References
* 6 External links

[edit] Specifications

In many respects this cartridge parallels the .600 Nitro Express, in that it is essentially a scaled-up version of that cartridge, but is somewhat more powerful, and fires a heavier 1000-grain (64.8 g) bullet. The case itself is a completely new case, not simply another case resized. Double rifles are extremely expensive (many will sell for US $60,000 or much more in 2005 American currency) and have generally been replaced by magazine-rifle rounds like the .458 Winchester. Single factory loaded .700 Nitro cartridges are available, typically at $100 each, although they have been sold on the internet for as little as $50. This round, like many other big bore cartridges, can be hand reloaded, drastically reducing the cost - although few users are likely to expend much of this massively-recoiling ammunition.

While the .700 Nitro Express is sometimes claimed to be the "most powerful commercial round in the world", by the manufacturer, this is not exactly true. The .700 Nitro Express double rifle is only available on a custom order basis, and has never seen regular production, while the .585 Nyati which is built under similar circumstances is significantly more powerful. The .577 Tyrannosaur also develops more energy. Currently the most powerful rifle cartridge available on a commercial basis is the .50 BMG. It is also referred to as the most powerful sporting cartridge in the world. The largest caliber sporting cartridge is a wildcat 2 bore cartridge which fires a 3500 grain 1.326" diameter projectile generating 17500 ft-lbs of energy.
[edit] Ballistics

The .700 Nitro Express develops an approximate average of 8900 foot pounds (12 kJ) of muzzle energy with a 1,000 gr (65 g) bullet at 2,000 ft/s (610 m/s). However handloaders can push the cartridge to generate as much as 15,000 ft·lbf (20.3 kJ) in a modern bolt action, by using a 1,000 gr (65 g) bullet fired at 2,600 ft/s (792 m/s). However, doing so makes the action of the rifle used nearly inoperable (especially in the case of a boxlock or sidelock rifle), while at the same time rupturing the cartridge casing and the primer cap.

The typical average muzzle velocity of a factory-loaded cartridge is 2,000 ft/s (610 m/s). In the 14-pound rifle used by Accurate Reloading this would result in recoil energy of approximately 196 ft·lbf (266 J). This is more than ten times the average recoil from a .308 Winchester which is a very common hunting caliber, and more than twice the recoil of a strong .45-70 Government round.
.700 Nitro Express bullet and case with .45 ACP cartridge (centre) for comparison
[edit] Comparable Calibers

Shoulder-fired rifle calibers comparable to the .700 Nitro Express in terms of power and recoil include the following:

* .600 Nitro Express
* .600 Overkill
* .585 Gehringer
* .585 Nyati
* .577 Tyrannosaur
* .475 A&M Magnum
* .460 Weatherby Magnum
* .50 BMG

[edit] See also

* List of rifle cartridges

[edit] References

1. ^ .700 Nitro Express load data at Accurate Reloading
2. ^ Cartridges of the World 11th Edition, Book by Frank C. Barnes, Edited by Stan Skinner, Gun Digest Books, 2006, ISBN 0-89689-297-2 pp. 406, 409

[edit] External links

* .700 Nitro Express Photo

Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/.700_Nitro_Express"
Categories: Pistol and rifle cartridges
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from Jere Smith wrote 4 years 8 weeks ago

Sorry for the double 'puter acting up!

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from Jere Smith wrote 4 years 8 weeks ago

If this works it shows a 700 Nitro Exp being fired.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6-hbyCewako

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from Jere Smith wrote 4 years 8 weeks ago

If this works it shows 700 Nitro Exp Elephant Kills

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6-hbyCewako

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from Jere Smith wrote 4 years 8 weeks ago

Now this one should be the Elephat Kill with a 700 Nitro!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hUi8cKo9dNI&feature=related

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from 99explorer wrote 4 years 8 weeks ago

That is truly a museum piece.
On the subject of bolt knobs, I am reminded that the late great Jack O'Connor once had his right thumb broken while chambering a round, because he gripped the bolt knob between his thumb and forefinger while cycling the action. For some reason, the round went off before he could lock the bolt and it came straight back.

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from Gunslinger wrote 4 years 7 weeks ago

I wan' one, WHY no reasn, just want it. I got a Custom apparently he built, as no caliber and no name only intials stamed in the metal. It's the most beautful wood I ever saw, work manship is flawless. Now that I weight about l28 lbs, who's gonna hold me up to shot it and unless i go to africia, got no use for it, other than I want it. A beautiful piece of firearm, wish ws in my safe,

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from Riflemakers Wife wrote 4 years 7 weeks ago

Hi Gunslinger
I'm wondering about that custom that you think might be one of Ryan's Rifle's Who's was it and when and where did you get it? I am always curoius about the first Rifle's who has them and where they are? you can call or e-mail me at www.Toni@rbbigbores.com or go to rbbigbores.com and get our number. Thank's to anyone that can let Gunslinger I would like to contact him...

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from hillphoto wrote 4 years 7 weeks ago

I have had the pleasure of working with Ryan and photographing his latest rifles. He does truly beautiful work. Check out some of the images we did just last week: http://hillphoto208.blogspot.com/2010/02/lets-shoot_22.html
Ryan's rifles are a testament to his attention to detail.

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from woodley wrote 4 years 6 weeks ago

Just joined up here from Zim thanks to Tom, every time we get back to camp from a day in the field the Gibbs would be inspected by me and all fingerprints removed ready for the next day. It is truly the African Classic.
Dan and I got stuck into a herd of Ellie cows and I stood back and watched as he began to deplete the herd with precision, he is not a big man but fired that 505 with absolute confidence hence we took 7 Cows in less than a minute. The balance was perfect and the recoil similar to my 458 LOTT, Ryan is a master and I am working my way towards owning one of these works of art, if you want to hunt Elephant, buff, hippo, you know the big stuff you have to call and place your order.

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from Kalahari wrote 4 years 4 weeks ago

Hi to all you Big Bore enthusiasts. We have a club in South Africa that's primary focus is shooting your big bore on a regular basis. We host a practical shoot on a bi-monthly basis and at one of those shoots you will see more big game rifles in use than most of you would see in a lifetime. Go to www.bigbore.org for details. I have never had so much fun in any shooting doctrine from Combat, Tactical,Clays to High Power Silhouette and anything in between. trust me I have tried them. The shoot concepts are to ensure you become familiar with your rifle and that it functions flawlessly as we live on a continent that does not favour fools. I believe that this shooting format should be copied and introduced to USA to get you shooting your big bores. Then all of you saying you have no use for one will have a valid excuse. The more you shoot the cheaper these components will get for us all. I need help on .416 Rem cases. I make cases from .375 H&H but cannot get through the borders with a different headstamp.
Just competed in a shoot this past Saturday and can't wait for the next.

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from whiskeyrunner wrote 4 years 1 week ago

I have known ryan for over 20 years. I have 3 of his early works of PERFECTION. Because of physical problems and shooting rifle left handed it posed a small problem making a 30-06 for me. He did it with his usual perfection. Left handed cheek plate and right handed bolt lever. This rifle is so accurate it is unbleiveable. The other rifles he did for me were rebuilds of 94 winchesters. When people look at them they just stand and stare. Anyoue wanting a custom rifle made needs to go to Ryan at RBBIGBORES he makes the best in the world. You cant go wrong going to him and getting your new custom rifle.

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from walnutstock wrote 3 years 43 weeks ago

Thank you Mr Petzal. Always enjoy your articles. Absolutely beautiful rifle, have no need for it, could never afford it nor the ammunition.
Just happy for the folks who get to use it.
Heaviest calibres I have ever fired were .375 H&H Mag and Govt 45/70 which surprisingly were nowhere as horrendous as I expected-I'm not saying they were light either but in a life and death situation I could hopefully hold my own with them.
However, just thinking about the .505 Gibbs, is already giving me the dreaded flinch!

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from HuntingJess wrote 3 years 13 weeks ago

This is a beautiful weapon. There is nothing like the craftsmanship of a well made rifle. I swear, this is like a work of art to me. There was a guy that owned an indianapolis roofing company that had a rifle just like this one. I loved to admire that thing.

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