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Shotguns: Going From One Trigger to Two

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April 15, 2011

Shotguns: Going From One Trigger to Two

By Phil Bourjaily

For years I shied away from two-trigger guns because I thought it would be difficult for me to switch back and forth from one to two. I inherited this belief from my dad, who was even more easily confused than I am. Dad never even shot pumps because he couldn’t remember to work the slide between shots.

I still don’t own any guns with double triggers, but shooting the Parker and the Fox while filming for season two of the The Gun Nuts TV show I adapted to two triggers without any conscious thought at all. I didn’t even dry practice with those guns, I just loaded them and took them hunting. A couple of times I had to make follow-ups and my finger went from the first trigger to the second all by itself. In the afternoon we filmed several segments with O/Us and semiautos, and my finger remembered to pull the single trigger twice.

What is interesting to me is that I had not shot a two-trigger gun since the picture above was taken in 2009, and that was on a one day hunt with a loaner gun (an Aya No. 2. Notice the articulated front trigger, which is jointed to bend forward so it won’t bang into your finger when you pull the back trigger and the light gun recoils). Before that I had not shot a two trigger gun since 2006, when I spent a two days shooting a classic double a lot, both at targets and birds. I think that is when I finally learned to be comfortable with two triggers.

Maybe learning to shoot double and single triggers is like learning to drive a manual and automatic transmission: once you learn how you never forget and you can switch back and forth without thinking. Thoughts?

Comments (34)

Top Rated
All Comments
from -Bob wrote 3 years 5 days ago

Phil, I respectfully disagree.

I’m in the same camp as your Dad, which is why I hunt with a single-trigger Browning Citori.

I like your “stick vs. auto” analogy, but I believe it only holds water if you are well-versed in both technologies AND making the switch frequently. It’s a sad fact of life that I drive waaay more than I shoot. I think that for the majority of us non-gunwriter recreational shooters, we would have difficulty making a quick transition.

Or maybe I’m just a klutz.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from jws wrote 3 years 5 days ago

There is one good reason for 2 triggers. Your mind subconsciously slows down as you move to the second trigger. If you need the second shot, you aren't just spraying pellets into the air like anti-aircraft fire, you actually are concentrating on the target at hand. Long live 2 triggers!

+6 Good Comment? | | Report
from Double D wrote 3 years 5 days ago

I'm with you Bob. I take my grandfather's 16-gauge Ithaca Long-Range Gun out about once a year and it never fails that I:
A.) Miss the first shot.
2.) Forget to move my finger back for the second shot.
When I finally splurge on a good double-gun, I'm going to opt for a single trigger.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Drew McClure wrote 3 years 5 days ago

That is one well made gem of a shotgun, did you write that it was made in Spain? MSRP 5k. or so?

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from HogBlog wrote 3 years 5 days ago

I learned to shoot with single triggers (pumps and single shots), but always craved a "classic" double. When I finally got it, it seems like I adapted to pulling two triggers almost without a second thought. When I switch back to my pump guns, I don't miss a beat. The only time it seems to trip me up a little bit is when I'm shooting a single-trigger double. I think that's when muscle memory kicks in and I catch myself searching for that second trigger.

On doubles, I also find the second trigger requires a whole lot less conscious thought than trying to flip the selector when I want that second barrel to go off first.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Beekeeper wrote 3 years 5 days ago

I owned a Double trigger side by for a while and never had any problems with finger shuffle. I traded it for an O/U with a single selective. I wonder why I have a selective as I have never changed the setting while hunting... go figure!

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from SD Bob wrote 3 years 5 days ago

When I bought a sxs with double triggers a few years back, I was told by many whom I later learned had never used a double trigger gun, that I would struggle going between the two. That simply didn't happen. I find the position of the safety to be a far bigger challenge. Safeties on the tang or behind the trigger pose no problem but put that safety to the front of the trigger and I'll get looks of dissapproval from my dog.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Anhinga wrote 3 years 5 days ago

Both my o/u's have single, selective triggers. Unlike Beekeeper, I ofter change the barrel selector from IC to Mod., when the situation indicates a longer shot might be my only opportunity, e.g. a high passing dove or duck. My only issue is not remembering to switch the selector back to the more open choke, mine are fixed, and centering the pattern on an incoming dove at 15 or 20 yards with the Mod. barrel, producing a very tenderized specimen.

I am in the market for a SxS, and your description, Phil, of the ease of adapting to the double trigger system is certainly encouraging, since many of the models I have looked at have double triggers. My only hesitation now is the princely sums that are required to purchase most of these fine old or newer doubles.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Mark-1 wrote 3 years 5 days ago

Never bothered me going from a single to a double trigger gun, yet I prefer a single trigger double.

An double barrel shotgun item giving me pause was a conversation with five very good competitive gunners asking why I still use a double for targets. They all had Beretta or Benelli semi-autos.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from lea001a wrote 3 years 5 days ago

A Parker VH Grade, if restored, will sell for $4,000-5000US these days, a VHE (auto ejectors) a little more, depending. That's about a 50%/yr interest rate! Those very best (IMHO) restorations are from Doug Turnbull AND Larry DelGrego III, who has original Parker parts and barrels from the Remington factory (his dad bought them from Remington when they stopped making the Parkers). His shop is down the road from Ilion in Frankfort, NY. My father had an A1 Special in .410 bore with a straight grip, supposedly only proof fired in Meriden, CT. It was goegeous! He had several others, restored by these guys, but used a Parker single barrel trap gun a lot also. It needed repairs frequently, as I recall. But it could shoot! I declined to accept them as part of his estate for several irrational reasons, mostly to appease my wife who did not like guns. Poor me!

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Sb Wacker wrote 3 years 5 days ago

'I had to make follow-ups and my finger went from the first trigger to the second all by itself'

That'll be because your brain works quicker than you think!

Cheers
SBW

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Mike Diehl wrote 3 years 5 days ago

No trouble at all adapting to my double-trigger SxS.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Sanjuancb wrote 3 years 5 days ago

I actually prefer two triggers. For me there are just as easy to operate and if I have two very different chokes in a gun the triggers are much easier for me to chose from than a safety that selects the barrel.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from AZShooterDude wrote 3 years 5 days ago

I own both single and double trigger side by sides, it took a little prethinking to become accustomed to the double triggers, but it is second nature now. The Index finger seems to have a built-in sense of where to apply that second pull. If a person has the wherewithall to track, you usually have instant choke selection also, haven't quite mastered that aspect yet, but there is hope.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from cap wrote 3 years 5 days ago

I shoot clays with a single trigger O/U all spring and summer. I hunt with a double trigger O/U in the fall and winter with no problems. The double trigger is the only way to instantly change which barrel fires first and with a little practice you can do it with no thought.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from shane wrote 3 years 5 days ago

I prefer and use doubles on my doubles.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Tony C. wrote 3 years 5 days ago

I must be a lot denser than the rest of you. I waterfowled with a side by side with double triggers several years ago. It absolutely give me fits remembering to slide back and pull that 2nd trigger. I let some critters get away because of it.

A buddy had a 20-gauge side by side and had talked me into getting the same identical gun in 12 gauge. I ended up selling it to him for a song. I was glad to be rid of it.

I grew up with single shots, pumps and autos and just never got the hang of the double trigger. I did have an over and under with single selective trigger for several years and I loved it.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Bellringer wrote 3 years 5 days ago

To: lea001a

You need to grow a set of nads and stand up like a man.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Jere Smith wrote 3 years 5 days ago

Bellringer it sound's like it's too late :( they are in the freezer already.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Jim in Mo wrote 3 years 5 days ago

I like and I have only double triggers. DT's only makes sense to my brain when shooting.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Clay Cooper wrote 3 years 5 days ago

O" Do I remember pulling both triggers at the same time, OUCH!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Ralph the Rifleman wrote 3 years 5 days ago

I haven't shot with a double trigger gun for well over 25 years now;sold a S/S double trigger,went to a pump for number of years, sold it and have been shooting an O/U-single trigger ever since,about 15 years now. I would like to get another S/S for bird hunting;wonder how I would do using double triggers again after all these years?

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from MReeder wrote 3 years 5 days ago

I think if you're shooting both fairly often your mind adapts pretty quickly, but if you've been shooting one way more than the other, there's a little lag time. I say that after missing a chance at a turkey this week when I automatically went for my second trigger instead of the pump. I'd been shooting my O/U 12 almost exclusively the last couple of years, including for turkey. This year I bought a little H&R youth pump specifically for turkeys, because I'd gotten tired of hauling two barrels around the hills. A bunch of jakes answered our calls and came marching into our decoy spread, and I told my wife to pick one on the right and shoot. My idea was to let one on the left have it the second she shot. I thought they'd probably freeze for a second or at least mill around, since jakes often do. Instead they flushed like a covey of quail and I missed from about 15 yards away with a full choke. The one I shot at landed about 30 yards away running and I pulled down on his head and shot -- or rather, I tried to pull a rear trigger that wasn't there. In the second it took me to remember I needed to pump in another shell, he was around a bush and gone. I had pattered that gun, but I had not had any real chance to do a lot of other shooting with it. Didn't figure it would matter since turkeys are usually a one-shot proposition, but there you go... and there he went. I'll be heading to the gun range tomorrow to run a box or two through that pump before I head back to the woods on Tuesday.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from pennsylvania wrote 3 years 4 days ago

Phil - A different question ... what type of shotgun [o/u - semi] would you recommend for someone who is getting started in trap. Also, any specific model or manufacturer.

Best,
Pennsylvania

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from 99explorer wrote 3 years 4 days ago

My doubles have always had double triggers, so I never became spoiled by using a single trigger. Auto ejectors are another matter. I could never go back to extractors.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from philbourjaily wrote 3 years 4 days ago

Pennsylvania -- Semiautos have the advantage of recoil reduction. The Remington 1100 and Beretta 391 both come in trap models. The Remington shoots softer, the 391 runs longer between cleanings.
In break action guns I like the single-shot Browning BT-99 for its simplicity.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Jayrod wrote 3 years 4 days ago

I started grouse hunting in my teens. I borrowed my Dads 12ga pump that had a 30 inch barrel and full choke. I walked a lot, shot a lot, but couldn't hit nuthin. Finally dawned on me the gun was choked too tight and was pooch dog slow. I had to do something. I was really enjoying this grouse hunting but I was having no luck at all. I was really bummed, I had to do something. With the meager amount of cash I had, I went looking. Wanted something snazzy, could really handle, and speed to burn. I found it. An old spainish double. Two barrels, two triggers. Couldn't wait to kick in the throttle on this one (so to speak). And kick it in I did, and those birds started dropping, left and right and down the middle (no kidding). It was like I couldn't miss with the darn thing. I was very happy. Did a lot of grouse hunting solo and with friends. Some of the best years of my life. I still have that old gun and it has a special place in the closet. I have had a number of really good guns over the years like a couple Berretas sxs, Franchi sxs, Browning Citori, some others, and I use a Benneli Ultralight for pheasant hunting. I shot an english Boss and it was uncanny how that gun handled. My wallet was and never has been full enough to have bought it if the owner would have been willing to sell it. Which he wasn't. I don't blame him, I wouldn't have either. I am rambling. The thing about two triggers at least for me is that it has always given me instant choke choice. It has been engrained in me a long time. I miss two triggers when I'm shooting a single trigger. Short, long, in between, it doesn't make a difference when I use two triggers. Thanks

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from RES1956 wrote 3 years 2 days ago

I bought an AyA from a guy stationed at Ft. Rucker about 1973 or so. He had purchased it at a Rod and Gun club somewhere in Spain and it was immaculate. A 20 ga with way too much choke to suit me, with double triggers and an automatic safety which dealt me more fits than did the double triggers. Had it not been for the writing of the legendary Jack O'Connor, I would not have known what it was, the 'poor man's Holland & Holland', I think is how he referred to the AyA line. I never could figure out the rationale for the cyl. and full barrel combo,,,

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Jim in Mo wrote 3 years 2 days ago

Res1956,
AyA is a damn good gun. I agree, a full choke in a twenty is to much, I'd take a modified and cylinder in my 20 double given the choice if pheasants are on the menu otherwise Imp and Cyl.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Michigan Gunner wrote 3 years 2 days ago

I like double triggers. It is the fastest system to select which choke you want. That said, I use Autos, Pumps, OU's, SXS, and singles. So, I'm very comfortable changing gun types.

Lock and Load!

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from MLH wrote 3 years 1 day ago

I get so used to using one gun at a time that it takes me some conscious thought to switch. I'll try to pump the double, and finger search for the second trigger on the pump.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from MReeder wrote 3 years 12 hours ago

Just an FYI, which should already be obvious. I don't know who's piggybacking on my old posts, but it obviously isn't me. Just got back from a turkey hunt and saw a couple of posts I'd left repeated and added to by some other sender. Did some password rearranging to see if that stops it. Based on what was in it, I'd say the Chi-Coms are behind it.
You'd think they'd be content to be holding the whole country hostage by buying up our debt, all the while expanding the arsenal they've been accumulating with all that cash we send them in exchange for cheap furniture, but no -- they have to come after the Gun Nuts blog, too. What's next? The Statue of Liberty?
All seriousness aside, what kind of idiot thinks he's actually promoting a product by hijacking sites and putting crap like that up on screen?

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from New Age Bubba wrote 2 years 45 weeks ago

Let's admit that double triggers are like manual/stick transmissions: a little tricky but worth it if you learn to do it right (other activities carried out in vehicles fall into this category, but this is a family publication)

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from fleshman1 wrote 2 years 44 weeks ago

thats very understandable how you felt but all you had to do was try and get used to it

0 Good Comment? | | Report

Post a Comment

from jws wrote 3 years 5 days ago

There is one good reason for 2 triggers. Your mind subconsciously slows down as you move to the second trigger. If you need the second shot, you aren't just spraying pellets into the air like anti-aircraft fire, you actually are concentrating on the target at hand. Long live 2 triggers!

+6 Good Comment? | | Report
from Beekeeper wrote 3 years 5 days ago

I owned a Double trigger side by for a while and never had any problems with finger shuffle. I traded it for an O/U with a single selective. I wonder why I have a selective as I have never changed the setting while hunting... go figure!

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from SD Bob wrote 3 years 5 days ago

When I bought a sxs with double triggers a few years back, I was told by many whom I later learned had never used a double trigger gun, that I would struggle going between the two. That simply didn't happen. I find the position of the safety to be a far bigger challenge. Safeties on the tang or behind the trigger pose no problem but put that safety to the front of the trigger and I'll get looks of dissapproval from my dog.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Sb Wacker wrote 3 years 5 days ago

'I had to make follow-ups and my finger went from the first trigger to the second all by itself'

That'll be because your brain works quicker than you think!

Cheers
SBW

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Sanjuancb wrote 3 years 5 days ago

I actually prefer two triggers. For me there are just as easy to operate and if I have two very different chokes in a gun the triggers are much easier for me to chose from than a safety that selects the barrel.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Jayrod wrote 3 years 4 days ago

I started grouse hunting in my teens. I borrowed my Dads 12ga pump that had a 30 inch barrel and full choke. I walked a lot, shot a lot, but couldn't hit nuthin. Finally dawned on me the gun was choked too tight and was pooch dog slow. I had to do something. I was really enjoying this grouse hunting but I was having no luck at all. I was really bummed, I had to do something. With the meager amount of cash I had, I went looking. Wanted something snazzy, could really handle, and speed to burn. I found it. An old spainish double. Two barrels, two triggers. Couldn't wait to kick in the throttle on this one (so to speak). And kick it in I did, and those birds started dropping, left and right and down the middle (no kidding). It was like I couldn't miss with the darn thing. I was very happy. Did a lot of grouse hunting solo and with friends. Some of the best years of my life. I still have that old gun and it has a special place in the closet. I have had a number of really good guns over the years like a couple Berretas sxs, Franchi sxs, Browning Citori, some others, and I use a Benneli Ultralight for pheasant hunting. I shot an english Boss and it was uncanny how that gun handled. My wallet was and never has been full enough to have bought it if the owner would have been willing to sell it. Which he wasn't. I don't blame him, I wouldn't have either. I am rambling. The thing about two triggers at least for me is that it has always given me instant choke choice. It has been engrained in me a long time. I miss two triggers when I'm shooting a single trigger. Short, long, in between, it doesn't make a difference when I use two triggers. Thanks

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from -Bob wrote 3 years 5 days ago

Phil, I respectfully disagree.

I’m in the same camp as your Dad, which is why I hunt with a single-trigger Browning Citori.

I like your “stick vs. auto” analogy, but I believe it only holds water if you are well-versed in both technologies AND making the switch frequently. It’s a sad fact of life that I drive waaay more than I shoot. I think that for the majority of us non-gunwriter recreational shooters, we would have difficulty making a quick transition.

Or maybe I’m just a klutz.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Double D wrote 3 years 5 days ago

I'm with you Bob. I take my grandfather's 16-gauge Ithaca Long-Range Gun out about once a year and it never fails that I:
A.) Miss the first shot.
2.) Forget to move my finger back for the second shot.
When I finally splurge on a good double-gun, I'm going to opt for a single trigger.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Drew McClure wrote 3 years 5 days ago

That is one well made gem of a shotgun, did you write that it was made in Spain? MSRP 5k. or so?

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from HogBlog wrote 3 years 5 days ago

I learned to shoot with single triggers (pumps and single shots), but always craved a "classic" double. When I finally got it, it seems like I adapted to pulling two triggers almost without a second thought. When I switch back to my pump guns, I don't miss a beat. The only time it seems to trip me up a little bit is when I'm shooting a single-trigger double. I think that's when muscle memory kicks in and I catch myself searching for that second trigger.

On doubles, I also find the second trigger requires a whole lot less conscious thought than trying to flip the selector when I want that second barrel to go off first.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Anhinga wrote 3 years 5 days ago

Both my o/u's have single, selective triggers. Unlike Beekeeper, I ofter change the barrel selector from IC to Mod., when the situation indicates a longer shot might be my only opportunity, e.g. a high passing dove or duck. My only issue is not remembering to switch the selector back to the more open choke, mine are fixed, and centering the pattern on an incoming dove at 15 or 20 yards with the Mod. barrel, producing a very tenderized specimen.

I am in the market for a SxS, and your description, Phil, of the ease of adapting to the double trigger system is certainly encouraging, since many of the models I have looked at have double triggers. My only hesitation now is the princely sums that are required to purchase most of these fine old or newer doubles.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Mark-1 wrote 3 years 5 days ago

Never bothered me going from a single to a double trigger gun, yet I prefer a single trigger double.

An double barrel shotgun item giving me pause was a conversation with five very good competitive gunners asking why I still use a double for targets. They all had Beretta or Benelli semi-autos.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from lea001a wrote 3 years 5 days ago

A Parker VH Grade, if restored, will sell for $4,000-5000US these days, a VHE (auto ejectors) a little more, depending. That's about a 50%/yr interest rate! Those very best (IMHO) restorations are from Doug Turnbull AND Larry DelGrego III, who has original Parker parts and barrels from the Remington factory (his dad bought them from Remington when they stopped making the Parkers). His shop is down the road from Ilion in Frankfort, NY. My father had an A1 Special in .410 bore with a straight grip, supposedly only proof fired in Meriden, CT. It was goegeous! He had several others, restored by these guys, but used a Parker single barrel trap gun a lot also. It needed repairs frequently, as I recall. But it could shoot! I declined to accept them as part of his estate for several irrational reasons, mostly to appease my wife who did not like guns. Poor me!

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Mike Diehl wrote 3 years 5 days ago

No trouble at all adapting to my double-trigger SxS.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from AZShooterDude wrote 3 years 5 days ago

I own both single and double trigger side by sides, it took a little prethinking to become accustomed to the double triggers, but it is second nature now. The Index finger seems to have a built-in sense of where to apply that second pull. If a person has the wherewithall to track, you usually have instant choke selection also, haven't quite mastered that aspect yet, but there is hope.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from cap wrote 3 years 5 days ago

I shoot clays with a single trigger O/U all spring and summer. I hunt with a double trigger O/U in the fall and winter with no problems. The double trigger is the only way to instantly change which barrel fires first and with a little practice you can do it with no thought.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from shane wrote 3 years 5 days ago

I prefer and use doubles on my doubles.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Tony C. wrote 3 years 5 days ago

I must be a lot denser than the rest of you. I waterfowled with a side by side with double triggers several years ago. It absolutely give me fits remembering to slide back and pull that 2nd trigger. I let some critters get away because of it.

A buddy had a 20-gauge side by side and had talked me into getting the same identical gun in 12 gauge. I ended up selling it to him for a song. I was glad to be rid of it.

I grew up with single shots, pumps and autos and just never got the hang of the double trigger. I did have an over and under with single selective trigger for several years and I loved it.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Bellringer wrote 3 years 5 days ago

To: lea001a

You need to grow a set of nads and stand up like a man.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from RES1956 wrote 3 years 2 days ago

I bought an AyA from a guy stationed at Ft. Rucker about 1973 or so. He had purchased it at a Rod and Gun club somewhere in Spain and it was immaculate. A 20 ga with way too much choke to suit me, with double triggers and an automatic safety which dealt me more fits than did the double triggers. Had it not been for the writing of the legendary Jack O'Connor, I would not have known what it was, the 'poor man's Holland & Holland', I think is how he referred to the AyA line. I never could figure out the rationale for the cyl. and full barrel combo,,,

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Michigan Gunner wrote 3 years 2 days ago

I like double triggers. It is the fastest system to select which choke you want. That said, I use Autos, Pumps, OU's, SXS, and singles. So, I'm very comfortable changing gun types.

Lock and Load!

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Jere Smith wrote 3 years 5 days ago

Bellringer it sound's like it's too late :( they are in the freezer already.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Jim in Mo wrote 3 years 5 days ago

I like and I have only double triggers. DT's only makes sense to my brain when shooting.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Clay Cooper wrote 3 years 5 days ago

O" Do I remember pulling both triggers at the same time, OUCH!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Ralph the Rifleman wrote 3 years 5 days ago

I haven't shot with a double trigger gun for well over 25 years now;sold a S/S double trigger,went to a pump for number of years, sold it and have been shooting an O/U-single trigger ever since,about 15 years now. I would like to get another S/S for bird hunting;wonder how I would do using double triggers again after all these years?

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from MReeder wrote 3 years 5 days ago

I think if you're shooting both fairly often your mind adapts pretty quickly, but if you've been shooting one way more than the other, there's a little lag time. I say that after missing a chance at a turkey this week when I automatically went for my second trigger instead of the pump. I'd been shooting my O/U 12 almost exclusively the last couple of years, including for turkey. This year I bought a little H&R youth pump specifically for turkeys, because I'd gotten tired of hauling two barrels around the hills. A bunch of jakes answered our calls and came marching into our decoy spread, and I told my wife to pick one on the right and shoot. My idea was to let one on the left have it the second she shot. I thought they'd probably freeze for a second or at least mill around, since jakes often do. Instead they flushed like a covey of quail and I missed from about 15 yards away with a full choke. The one I shot at landed about 30 yards away running and I pulled down on his head and shot -- or rather, I tried to pull a rear trigger that wasn't there. In the second it took me to remember I needed to pump in another shell, he was around a bush and gone. I had pattered that gun, but I had not had any real chance to do a lot of other shooting with it. Didn't figure it would matter since turkeys are usually a one-shot proposition, but there you go... and there he went. I'll be heading to the gun range tomorrow to run a box or two through that pump before I head back to the woods on Tuesday.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from pennsylvania wrote 3 years 4 days ago

Phil - A different question ... what type of shotgun [o/u - semi] would you recommend for someone who is getting started in trap. Also, any specific model or manufacturer.

Best,
Pennsylvania

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from 99explorer wrote 3 years 4 days ago

My doubles have always had double triggers, so I never became spoiled by using a single trigger. Auto ejectors are another matter. I could never go back to extractors.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from philbourjaily wrote 3 years 4 days ago

Pennsylvania -- Semiautos have the advantage of recoil reduction. The Remington 1100 and Beretta 391 both come in trap models. The Remington shoots softer, the 391 runs longer between cleanings.
In break action guns I like the single-shot Browning BT-99 for its simplicity.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Jim in Mo wrote 3 years 2 days ago

Res1956,
AyA is a damn good gun. I agree, a full choke in a twenty is to much, I'd take a modified and cylinder in my 20 double given the choice if pheasants are on the menu otherwise Imp and Cyl.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from MLH wrote 3 years 1 day ago

I get so used to using one gun at a time that it takes me some conscious thought to switch. I'll try to pump the double, and finger search for the second trigger on the pump.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from MReeder wrote 3 years 12 hours ago

Just an FYI, which should already be obvious. I don't know who's piggybacking on my old posts, but it obviously isn't me. Just got back from a turkey hunt and saw a couple of posts I'd left repeated and added to by some other sender. Did some password rearranging to see if that stops it. Based on what was in it, I'd say the Chi-Coms are behind it.
You'd think they'd be content to be holding the whole country hostage by buying up our debt, all the while expanding the arsenal they've been accumulating with all that cash we send them in exchange for cheap furniture, but no -- they have to come after the Gun Nuts blog, too. What's next? The Statue of Liberty?
All seriousness aside, what kind of idiot thinks he's actually promoting a product by hijacking sites and putting crap like that up on screen?

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from New Age Bubba wrote 2 years 45 weeks ago

Let's admit that double triggers are like manual/stick transmissions: a little tricky but worth it if you learn to do it right (other activities carried out in vehicles fall into this category, but this is a family publication)

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from fleshman1 wrote 2 years 44 weeks ago

thats very understandable how you felt but all you had to do was try and get used to it

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