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Talking African Dangerous Game Hunting with Tony Sanchez-Arino

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February 17, 2012

Talking African Dangerous Game Hunting with Tony Sanchez-Arino

By David E. Petzal

The other night I had the pleasure of listening to a talk by Tony Sanchez-Arino who, at age 82, is about to begin his 60th season as an African professional hunter. In addition to countless safaris, he was also an ivory hunter and, I would guess, a game-control shooter. His numbers of animals taken are staggering: just under 1,300 elephant, 2,044 Cape buffalo, and 322 lion. His talk dealt with the three questions he is most often asked.

Which is better, a double rifle or a bolt action?

Answer: "They’re both good. You go with whatever is most familiar to you. Don’t go to Africa with a rifle that’s new and strange."

What’s the most dangerous animal?

"That’s impossible to answer, because a lot of it depends on the country in which you hunt them. For example, Cape buffalo in open country are as easy to kill as cattle, but in heavy cover they’re something else. I can tell you what is most likely to kill you if it gets hold of you, and those animals are, in order, elephant, Cape buffalo, and lion."

What’s the toughest animal to stop?

"The Cape buffalo is by far the toughest. Sometimes when you’re shooting them it seems like you’re giving them vitamin pills. Lions can be difficult because they’re so fast; a lion can cover 100 meters in 6 seconds. People get in trouble because they shoot at them from too far away. Get close and you won’t have a problem. Elephants are comparatively easy to drop."

And as a side note, Sr. Sanchez-Arino’s favorite bullet is the Swift A-Frame (which is true for a number of PHs I've talked to) and the rifle he uses most is a .416 Rigby bolt-action.

He’s contemptuous of a number of things: “Ballistics tables, all these formulas and numbers, anything you read on the Internet, and ‘experts.’ All you need is a bullet with enough penetration to reach the vitals of whatever you’re hunting. The rest is nonsense. And never believe anything you read on the Internet, or anything you hear from an ‘expert.’ From them, you get horse***t in industrial quantities.”

He has never, in the course of all his years in the profession, gotten so much as a scratch.

Comments (44)

Top Rated
All Comments
from MJC wrote 2 years 8 weeks ago

Sounds like somebody I'd love to talk to. Or better yet, hunt with.

Although, with all due respect to Mr. Sanchez-Arino's opinion on the internet and experts, I'll keep reading the Gun Nut even though it combines both.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from WA Mtnhunter wrote 2 years 8 weeks ago

All the more reason to steer clear of Dagga Boy!

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Chad Beck wrote 2 years 8 weeks ago

Speaking of PH's what is your opinion of Peter Hathaway Capstick? Real deal or fraud.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Happy Myles wrote 2 years 8 weeks ago

A real legend, still living. Have spoken with him a few times, he has always treated me with courtesy, an unknown amateur. His points are all well taken. Might add one thought, I read a response to the oft asked question, "what is the most dangerous animal?" The wounded one you cannot see, was the reply.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from Mark-1 wrote 2 years 8 weeks ago

Glad he's 82 and still pretty. Love hearing and reading the thoughts of great hunters and outdoor writers "Unplugged" describing the tinsel and glamour.

Mr. Carmichel once remarked his career was filled with stabs, stings, bites, frost bite, corruption of the bowels and virulent skin rashes.

Weigh in, Dave!!!

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from davidpetzal wrote 2 years 8 weeks ago

Amen to what Jim wrote.

Of the PHs I've hunted with, one was killed by an elephant, one was nearly killed by an elephant (and was openly terrified of them afterward), and I believe three were chewed by leopards. Before antibiotics this was often fatal, but now few people die of it if someone peels old chui off before he does too much damage.

My animal-related close calls have all involved buffalo; there have been three. My non-animal-related close calls in Africa have been due to PHs who were crazy, and South African immigration officials who did not like American writers.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from Harold wrote 2 years 8 weeks ago

To Chad: I believe Peter H. Capstick was mostly a fraud! I have read that much of what he claimed to have done was actually done by others. He may be who Mr. Sanchez-Arino was talking about.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from ITHACASXS wrote 2 years 8 weeks ago

Since I was very young in the 1960s, I could never get enough of reading about hunting in Africa. The great thing about back then was you could find good (I thought so) articles in a lot of men's magazines and what Dad didn't have, Uncle Harry did, including old hard cover books for boys about The Dark Continent. Thank you Mr. Petzal and Mr. Happy Miles, don't be shy with the comments now, they are enjoyed more than you may know.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from ishawooa wrote 2 years 8 weeks ago

I have never hunted Africa, always wanted to but somehow something always seemed to stand in the way. I do enjoy visiting with my many friends who have made numerous trips to various parts of that continent and find their stories very interesting and often entertaining. Now if only I could read a few books on the subject by authors such as Mr. Petzel, Mr. Myles, and now Mr. Sanchez-Arino I would have many hours of amusement and education on my hands. I patiently await the publishing of those volumes.

+4 Good Comment? | | Report
from Ralph the Rifleman wrote 2 years 8 weeks ago

Dave,
Thanks for this article; has this man published any books? What a wealth of experience in one man's life!

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from bassman06 wrote 2 years 8 weeks ago

David, my close calls with any animals are two species: my dog and feral hogs. At most I've been feet away from being gored, then of course, being me and having no treestand, climbed a tree.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from linghinggg wrote 2 years 8 weeks ago

www proxy4biz com

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Carney wrote 2 years 8 weeks ago

So I'm reading and thinking like, "Heck yes. Good stuff!"

But then, I'm reading what the "expert" is saying. On the internet...

+4 Good Comment? | | Report
from 1uglymutha wrote 2 years 8 weeks ago

this guy makes good sense. he couldn't write a book though. to be entertaining a book must contain industrial quantities of the aforementioned horses**t. bull or not i enjoy reading about africa from those who have been there and done that. capstick excepted. that guy pegs out my bull***t-o-meter pretty quick.

-2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Happy Myles wrote 2 years 8 weeks ago

Embarrassingly, I am a member of the CBC Club(Chewed by Chui Club). Only scare by elephant was in deep jungle by a previously wounded pygmy elephant, that heavy cover makes things up close and personal. Had to sort out a lioness in Zambia, she had lost a foot in a poachers snare. It was two steps to her nose when things came to an end. Have been lucky with buffalo, only had one of my own charge and he had also been wounded by a poacher in the Central African Republic. Have had to help out with a couple wounded by others. As has been mentioned, they take a lot of killing when this happens. That is when my 470 side by side is appreciated(by me).
kwaheri, na tutaonana.

+7 Good Comment? | | Report
from Happy Myles wrote 2 years 8 weeks ago

Dave,
Forgot to mention, never had a problem with with South African customs. Last time I was there the female lady at the airport police firearm check point actually came from behind her counter and gave me a hug. Years ago, after being mauled by a leopard, another lady attempting to get me on a flight home stated, "this is a matter of compassionate mercy, this man has been eaten by a tiger". That really got my attention. Kindest to All

+6 Good Comment? | | Report
from Tom-Tom wrote 2 years 8 weeks ago

Did anyone video or otherwise record this man's talk? First hand information such as he can offer is far better fare than the televised versions of African hunting as offered today.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from Tom-Tom wrote 2 years 8 weeks ago

And I forgot to add, "Thank You", Dave, for sharing this experience. It helps this reader to "separate the wheat from the chaff".

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from tom warner wrote 2 years 8 weeks ago

Regarding Capstick, my BS detector went bright red many years ago when I read some of his writings regarding African snakes - a subject that I know a bit about. It was mostly total baloney. Despite my real admiration for his writing skills, which were considerable, I never believed much of what he said after that.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from Mark-1 wrote 2 years 8 weeks ago

My opinion on Capstick is he was a yarn’er. He loved to spin a good yarn and many times went beyond actual facts for the yarn’s sake. The guy had good commercial backing since he looked good yarning.

I personally didn’t care for Peter’s writing style or presentation. I thought his style aimed more at the 50’s and 60’s pulp adventure magazines that graced our local news stand and smoke shop. Some of his content was pretty outlandish to believe.

Just remember Ruark and Hemmingway were both yarn’ers, too. But they had “Taste”.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Archie wrote 2 years 8 weeks ago

I had the pleasure of meeting Tony Sanchez Arino and his beautiful wife Isabelle at the 2006 Safari Club International convention. I was only hoping to get his books autographed and we ended up talking for over a half-hour. It was the most fascinating half-hour experience I ever had talking about African hunting and suitable rifles for African safaris. I also got Isabelle's book and autograph. Her book and hunting experiences with Tony is also a fascinating journey and I would highly recommend them both. Tony was kind enough to give me his address and we correspond and he keeps me up dated on his most recent elephant hunting safaris. As the saying goes "Tony Sanchez Arino is the real deal".

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from idduckhntr wrote 2 years 8 weeks ago

Why all the bashing on Capstick?

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from argoman wrote 2 years 8 weeks ago

looks like some people are getting the PH mixed up with the H. the PH takes the H hunting. both write books.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from O Garcia wrote 2 years 8 weeks ago

does this mean we don't have to read any of this particular blog? it's on the Internet, and coming from an expert.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Longbeard wrote 2 years 8 weeks ago

Thank you, Mr. P, for sharing this with us. I read these blogs to be entertained and, hopefully, learn something. Lately, the latter has been at least as strong as the former, thanks to you and the knowledgable contributors of Gun Nuts like Happy Myles. I sincerely hope to go to Africa some day and put this info to practical use.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Longbeard wrote 2 years 8 weeks ago

Thank you, Mr. P, for sharing this with us. I read these blogs to be entertained and, hopefully, learn something. Lately, the latter has been at least as strong as the former, thanks to you and the knowledgable contributors of Gun Nuts like Happy Myles. I sincerely hope to go to Africa some day and put this info to practical use.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Clay Cooper wrote 2 years 8 weeks ago

ken.mcloud said it best! “So, I think that the superior killing power of larger rounds is largely in our heads.(likely testosterone induced) A flat-shooting round that you can accurately place will produce as many if not more "bang-flop" kills as a heavy caliber round.”
-
On the other hand
-
"We have not heard from Ken McCloud in ages hope he was not carrying a fast stepping small caliber rifle and ran into a testosterone laden elephant that could not spell hydrostatic shock. Just teasing Clay. Kindest Regards"
-Happy Myles

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Big Country wrote 2 years 8 weeks ago

I would love to get my hands on his book. I have read almost evry Captick book I can find. And wile they may well be yarns, they make for a good read. I read alot about hunting Africa and I would like to go some day if just to hunt the plains Antilope or take pictures I would love to go.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Joshua Jones wrote 2 years 8 weeks ago

Africa is full of fly by night outfitters and bullshitters, the wisdom of a seasoned veteran such as Mr. Sanchez-Arino is always refreshing.

Big Country, Africa is easier and more affordable to get to than most people think. Email me at okie_archer@hotmail.com and I can give you some advice on where, when and with whom you should go.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from buckhunter wrote 2 years 8 weeks ago

Big Country,

Received my Safari Press catalog today. Mr. Sanchez-Arino's new book, Great African Calibers is now available. They have a Website, Safaripress.com.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Jim in Mo wrote 2 years 8 weeks ago

If nothing else the man takes a good picture. Hope he has a ghost writer for a book, I need some good reads.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from O Garcia wrote 2 years 8 weeks ago

As they say, Zane Grey was a dentist. Didn't stop him from spinning good yarns. "Tige's Lion", which appeared on F&S, is one of my favorite hunting short stories. I've never read Capstick, though.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Big Country wrote 2 years 8 weeks ago

Joshua Jones,
Thanks, I'll try to remember it when I get home I'll drop you a line. Work has emails as a no go unless it's internal.
Buckhunter,
I'll pull that web site and check it out.
Thanks for the info

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from jws wrote 2 years 8 weeks ago

Never believe anything you read on the internet? Then what are all of us doing here?!

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from jws wrote 2 years 8 weeks ago

Never believe anything you read on the internet? Then what are all of us doing here?!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Beekeeper wrote 2 years 8 weeks ago

"And never believe anything you read on the Internet, or anything you hear from an ‘expert.’ From them, you get horse***t in industrial quantities.”

Amen!

As for Capstick, many of his stories are very similar to the ones told by Wally Johnson.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from hutter wrote 2 years 8 weeks ago

I've always heard that leopard were the most dangerous because when they come they don't stop and they don't stop chewing until they are dead. Watched Ivan Carter the other night ,one of his P.H.'s had to go after a big wounded male lion,talk about hairey,my heart was beating fast just from watching.Good thing prairie dogs are'nt that dangerous !

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Happy Myles wrote 2 years 8 weeks ago

hutter,
Reread Mr Sanchez-Arinos comments. "the animals most likely to kill you are elephant, cape buffalo, and lion". The animal most likely to hurt you is leopard. If wounded they most always charge. They are smaller and can hide anywhere. They are equal opportunity maulers, very willing to jump from one person to another. However, compared to the other dangerous animals they rarely kill anyone. Just rip you, as I can attest to. Infection is always an issue.

Interestingly, what data is available indicates local people are more often killed by crocs and hippos than the Big Five dangerous game.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from Nyflyangler wrote 2 years 8 weeks ago

Always remember to apply this to what Petzal writes here.

"And never believe anything you read on the Internet, or anything you hear from an ‘expert.’ From them, you get horse***t in industrial quantities.”

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Nyflyangler wrote 2 years 8 weeks ago

Always remember to apply this to what Petzal writes here.

"And never believe anything you read on the Internet, or anything you hear from an ‘expert.’ From them, you get horse***t in industrial quantities.”

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Mark-1 wrote 2 years 8 weeks ago

Happy, I was told Hippos are considered extremely dangerous by the locals. Guess the animals come upon shore to night graze and are very aggressive. It seemed to me the locals loved eating Hippos.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Happy Myles wrote 2 years 8 weeks ago

Mark,
You're right from my experience. I am amazed how far from the rivers hippo will graze at night during a dry season. The locals will use hippo trails to follow home after a local party. Getting between a hippo and his water can cause problems. They are a huge animal with big teeth. In my experience, the bulls are territorial and fight each other, most have scars from old and new fights which occasionally make them cranky. After a shot at a hippo locals seem to appear out the ground, willing to help out for a share of meat, at least that has been true with half dozen or so hippo I have killed for lion bait.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from DuggaBoy wrote 2 years 7 weeks ago

I've read all of Capstick's books and really enjoyed them. Just because he has a certain flair to his writing doesn't mean it was all BS! If you weren't personally there then you can't comment on the truthfulness. He was, after all, a licensed PH in Botswana, Zambia, and Zimbabwe for many years. Hemingway's "Green Hill's of Africa" is almost unreadable to me and Roosevelt's "African Game Trails" is somewhere in the middle. I do respectfully disagree with Mr. Sanchez-Arino's take on ballistics tables. Math and physics don't lie! When hunting big, dangerous, thick-skinned African game....I want the biggest gun I can handle and shoot accurately!! I know you can kill a Cape buffalo with a .375, but if the poop hits the proverbial fan at 10 yards in thick crud I want a .460 Weatherby Mag shooting 500 grain solids at 2600 fps and almost 7500 foot-pounds of energy. That's a stopper!

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from mcboyzz567 wrote 2 years 7 weeks ago

man i would love to talk to this guy

+1 Good Comment? | | Report

Post a Comment

from Happy Myles wrote 2 years 8 weeks ago

Embarrassingly, I am a member of the CBC Club(Chewed by Chui Club). Only scare by elephant was in deep jungle by a previously wounded pygmy elephant, that heavy cover makes things up close and personal. Had to sort out a lioness in Zambia, she had lost a foot in a poachers snare. It was two steps to her nose when things came to an end. Have been lucky with buffalo, only had one of my own charge and he had also been wounded by a poacher in the Central African Republic. Have had to help out with a couple wounded by others. As has been mentioned, they take a lot of killing when this happens. That is when my 470 side by side is appreciated(by me).
kwaheri, na tutaonana.

+7 Good Comment? | | Report
from Happy Myles wrote 2 years 8 weeks ago

Dave,
Forgot to mention, never had a problem with with South African customs. Last time I was there the female lady at the airport police firearm check point actually came from behind her counter and gave me a hug. Years ago, after being mauled by a leopard, another lady attempting to get me on a flight home stated, "this is a matter of compassionate mercy, this man has been eaten by a tiger". That really got my attention. Kindest to All

+6 Good Comment? | | Report
from ishawooa wrote 2 years 8 weeks ago

I have never hunted Africa, always wanted to but somehow something always seemed to stand in the way. I do enjoy visiting with my many friends who have made numerous trips to various parts of that continent and find their stories very interesting and often entertaining. Now if only I could read a few books on the subject by authors such as Mr. Petzel, Mr. Myles, and now Mr. Sanchez-Arino I would have many hours of amusement and education on my hands. I patiently await the publishing of those volumes.

+4 Good Comment? | | Report
from Carney wrote 2 years 8 weeks ago

So I'm reading and thinking like, "Heck yes. Good stuff!"

But then, I'm reading what the "expert" is saying. On the internet...

+4 Good Comment? | | Report
from Happy Myles wrote 2 years 8 weeks ago

A real legend, still living. Have spoken with him a few times, he has always treated me with courtesy, an unknown amateur. His points are all well taken. Might add one thought, I read a response to the oft asked question, "what is the most dangerous animal?" The wounded one you cannot see, was the reply.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from davidpetzal wrote 2 years 8 weeks ago

Amen to what Jim wrote.

Of the PHs I've hunted with, one was killed by an elephant, one was nearly killed by an elephant (and was openly terrified of them afterward), and I believe three were chewed by leopards. Before antibiotics this was often fatal, but now few people die of it if someone peels old chui off before he does too much damage.

My animal-related close calls have all involved buffalo; there have been three. My non-animal-related close calls in Africa have been due to PHs who were crazy, and South African immigration officials who did not like American writers.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from Ralph the Rifleman wrote 2 years 8 weeks ago

Dave,
Thanks for this article; has this man published any books? What a wealth of experience in one man's life!

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from Tom-Tom wrote 2 years 8 weeks ago

Did anyone video or otherwise record this man's talk? First hand information such as he can offer is far better fare than the televised versions of African hunting as offered today.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from tom warner wrote 2 years 8 weeks ago

Regarding Capstick, my BS detector went bright red many years ago when I read some of his writings regarding African snakes - a subject that I know a bit about. It was mostly total baloney. Despite my real admiration for his writing skills, which were considerable, I never believed much of what he said after that.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from Archie wrote 2 years 8 weeks ago

I had the pleasure of meeting Tony Sanchez Arino and his beautiful wife Isabelle at the 2006 Safari Club International convention. I was only hoping to get his books autographed and we ended up talking for over a half-hour. It was the most fascinating half-hour experience I ever had talking about African hunting and suitable rifles for African safaris. I also got Isabelle's book and autograph. Her book and hunting experiences with Tony is also a fascinating journey and I would highly recommend them both. Tony was kind enough to give me his address and we correspond and he keeps me up dated on his most recent elephant hunting safaris. As the saying goes "Tony Sanchez Arino is the real deal".

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from idduckhntr wrote 2 years 8 weeks ago

Why all the bashing on Capstick?

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from Happy Myles wrote 2 years 8 weeks ago

hutter,
Reread Mr Sanchez-Arinos comments. "the animals most likely to kill you are elephant, cape buffalo, and lion". The animal most likely to hurt you is leopard. If wounded they most always charge. They are smaller and can hide anywhere. They are equal opportunity maulers, very willing to jump from one person to another. However, compared to the other dangerous animals they rarely kill anyone. Just rip you, as I can attest to. Infection is always an issue.

Interestingly, what data is available indicates local people are more often killed by crocs and hippos than the Big Five dangerous game.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from ITHACASXS wrote 2 years 8 weeks ago

Since I was very young in the 1960s, I could never get enough of reading about hunting in Africa. The great thing about back then was you could find good (I thought so) articles in a lot of men's magazines and what Dad didn't have, Uncle Harry did, including old hard cover books for boys about The Dark Continent. Thank you Mr. Petzal and Mr. Happy Miles, don't be shy with the comments now, they are enjoyed more than you may know.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Tom-Tom wrote 2 years 8 weeks ago

And I forgot to add, "Thank You", Dave, for sharing this experience. It helps this reader to "separate the wheat from the chaff".

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Clay Cooper wrote 2 years 8 weeks ago

ken.mcloud said it best! “So, I think that the superior killing power of larger rounds is largely in our heads.(likely testosterone induced) A flat-shooting round that you can accurately place will produce as many if not more "bang-flop" kills as a heavy caliber round.”
-
On the other hand
-
"We have not heard from Ken McCloud in ages hope he was not carrying a fast stepping small caliber rifle and ran into a testosterone laden elephant that could not spell hydrostatic shock. Just teasing Clay. Kindest Regards"
-Happy Myles

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Mark-1 wrote 2 years 8 weeks ago

Happy, I was told Hippos are considered extremely dangerous by the locals. Guess the animals come upon shore to night graze and are very aggressive. It seemed to me the locals loved eating Hippos.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Happy Myles wrote 2 years 8 weeks ago

Mark,
You're right from my experience. I am amazed how far from the rivers hippo will graze at night during a dry season. The locals will use hippo trails to follow home after a local party. Getting between a hippo and his water can cause problems. They are a huge animal with big teeth. In my experience, the bulls are territorial and fight each other, most have scars from old and new fights which occasionally make them cranky. After a shot at a hippo locals seem to appear out the ground, willing to help out for a share of meat, at least that has been true with half dozen or so hippo I have killed for lion bait.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from DuggaBoy wrote 2 years 7 weeks ago

I've read all of Capstick's books and really enjoyed them. Just because he has a certain flair to his writing doesn't mean it was all BS! If you weren't personally there then you can't comment on the truthfulness. He was, after all, a licensed PH in Botswana, Zambia, and Zimbabwe for many years. Hemingway's "Green Hill's of Africa" is almost unreadable to me and Roosevelt's "African Game Trails" is somewhere in the middle. I do respectfully disagree with Mr. Sanchez-Arino's take on ballistics tables. Math and physics don't lie! When hunting big, dangerous, thick-skinned African game....I want the biggest gun I can handle and shoot accurately!! I know you can kill a Cape buffalo with a .375, but if the poop hits the proverbial fan at 10 yards in thick crud I want a .460 Weatherby Mag shooting 500 grain solids at 2600 fps and almost 7500 foot-pounds of energy. That's a stopper!

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from MJC wrote 2 years 8 weeks ago

Sounds like somebody I'd love to talk to. Or better yet, hunt with.

Although, with all due respect to Mr. Sanchez-Arino's opinion on the internet and experts, I'll keep reading the Gun Nut even though it combines both.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from WA Mtnhunter wrote 2 years 8 weeks ago

All the more reason to steer clear of Dagga Boy!

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Chad Beck wrote 2 years 8 weeks ago

Speaking of PH's what is your opinion of Peter Hathaway Capstick? Real deal or fraud.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Mark-1 wrote 2 years 8 weeks ago

Glad he's 82 and still pretty. Love hearing and reading the thoughts of great hunters and outdoor writers "Unplugged" describing the tinsel and glamour.

Mr. Carmichel once remarked his career was filled with stabs, stings, bites, frost bite, corruption of the bowels and virulent skin rashes.

Weigh in, Dave!!!

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Harold wrote 2 years 8 weeks ago

To Chad: I believe Peter H. Capstick was mostly a fraud! I have read that much of what he claimed to have done was actually done by others. He may be who Mr. Sanchez-Arino was talking about.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from bassman06 wrote 2 years 8 weeks ago

David, my close calls with any animals are two species: my dog and feral hogs. At most I've been feet away from being gored, then of course, being me and having no treestand, climbed a tree.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from linghinggg wrote 2 years 8 weeks ago

www proxy4biz com

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Mark-1 wrote 2 years 8 weeks ago

My opinion on Capstick is he was a yarn’er. He loved to spin a good yarn and many times went beyond actual facts for the yarn’s sake. The guy had good commercial backing since he looked good yarning.

I personally didn’t care for Peter’s writing style or presentation. I thought his style aimed more at the 50’s and 60’s pulp adventure magazines that graced our local news stand and smoke shop. Some of his content was pretty outlandish to believe.

Just remember Ruark and Hemmingway were both yarn’ers, too. But they had “Taste”.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from argoman wrote 2 years 8 weeks ago

looks like some people are getting the PH mixed up with the H. the PH takes the H hunting. both write books.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from O Garcia wrote 2 years 8 weeks ago

does this mean we don't have to read any of this particular blog? it's on the Internet, and coming from an expert.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Longbeard wrote 2 years 8 weeks ago

Thank you, Mr. P, for sharing this with us. I read these blogs to be entertained and, hopefully, learn something. Lately, the latter has been at least as strong as the former, thanks to you and the knowledgable contributors of Gun Nuts like Happy Myles. I sincerely hope to go to Africa some day and put this info to practical use.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Longbeard wrote 2 years 8 weeks ago

Thank you, Mr. P, for sharing this with us. I read these blogs to be entertained and, hopefully, learn something. Lately, the latter has been at least as strong as the former, thanks to you and the knowledgable contributors of Gun Nuts like Happy Myles. I sincerely hope to go to Africa some day and put this info to practical use.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Big Country wrote 2 years 8 weeks ago

I would love to get my hands on his book. I have read almost evry Captick book I can find. And wile they may well be yarns, they make for a good read. I read alot about hunting Africa and I would like to go some day if just to hunt the plains Antilope or take pictures I would love to go.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Joshua Jones wrote 2 years 8 weeks ago

Africa is full of fly by night outfitters and bullshitters, the wisdom of a seasoned veteran such as Mr. Sanchez-Arino is always refreshing.

Big Country, Africa is easier and more affordable to get to than most people think. Email me at okie_archer@hotmail.com and I can give you some advice on where, when and with whom you should go.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from buckhunter wrote 2 years 8 weeks ago

Big Country,

Received my Safari Press catalog today. Mr. Sanchez-Arino's new book, Great African Calibers is now available. They have a Website, Safaripress.com.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Jim in Mo wrote 2 years 8 weeks ago

If nothing else the man takes a good picture. Hope he has a ghost writer for a book, I need some good reads.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from O Garcia wrote 2 years 8 weeks ago

As they say, Zane Grey was a dentist. Didn't stop him from spinning good yarns. "Tige's Lion", which appeared on F&S, is one of my favorite hunting short stories. I've never read Capstick, though.

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from Big Country wrote 2 years 8 weeks ago

Joshua Jones,
Thanks, I'll try to remember it when I get home I'll drop you a line. Work has emails as a no go unless it's internal.
Buckhunter,
I'll pull that web site and check it out.
Thanks for the info

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from jws wrote 2 years 8 weeks ago

Never believe anything you read on the internet? Then what are all of us doing here?!

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from Beekeeper wrote 2 years 8 weeks ago

"And never believe anything you read on the Internet, or anything you hear from an ‘expert.’ From them, you get horse***t in industrial quantities.”

Amen!

As for Capstick, many of his stories are very similar to the ones told by Wally Johnson.

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from hutter wrote 2 years 8 weeks ago

I've always heard that leopard were the most dangerous because when they come they don't stop and they don't stop chewing until they are dead. Watched Ivan Carter the other night ,one of his P.H.'s had to go after a big wounded male lion,talk about hairey,my heart was beating fast just from watching.Good thing prairie dogs are'nt that dangerous !

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from Nyflyangler wrote 2 years 8 weeks ago

Always remember to apply this to what Petzal writes here.

"And never believe anything you read on the Internet, or anything you hear from an ‘expert.’ From them, you get horse***t in industrial quantities.”

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from Nyflyangler wrote 2 years 8 weeks ago

Always remember to apply this to what Petzal writes here.

"And never believe anything you read on the Internet, or anything you hear from an ‘expert.’ From them, you get horse***t in industrial quantities.”

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from mcboyzz567 wrote 2 years 7 weeks ago

man i would love to talk to this guy

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from jws wrote 2 years 8 weeks ago

Never believe anything you read on the internet? Then what are all of us doing here?!

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from 1uglymutha wrote 2 years 8 weeks ago

this guy makes good sense. he couldn't write a book though. to be entertaining a book must contain industrial quantities of the aforementioned horses**t. bull or not i enjoy reading about africa from those who have been there and done that. capstick excepted. that guy pegs out my bull***t-o-meter pretty quick.

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