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April 06, 2012

Flying Freaked Out

By David E. Petzal

What with airline meltdowns occurring on a more or less regular basis, I thought I’d pass along a story from a friend of mine who flies with guns to Great Britain on a regular basis. This took place about 10 years ago at Heathrow’s Terminal Four. My friend, hereinafter known as Douglas because that is not his name, arrived in England with two rifles of his own to hunt red stag. While there, he purchased 3 more. Then it was time to go home.

On arriving at Heathrow he first proceeded to the British Airlines ticket desk and declared his rifles. At this point they were taken from him by a Security agent, and the two men went on to the next stop, which was Her Majesty’s Revenues and Customs. It was there that the trouble began. Douglas’ piles and piles of paperwork were in order, but the woman at the Customs desk, in Douglas’ words, “...took my five rifles as prima facie evidence that I was either insane, or a terrorist. She had probably never seen a real gun before, and here were five of them on her desk so she could check the serial numbers.”

She did the only thing a seasoned bureaucrat could do. She took the pile of papers, went into her glass office, locked the door, and did nothing. And the clock ticked away, and it was already time to board. Finally, the Security agent pounded on the door. Nothing happened. Then the Security agent really pounded on the door. The Customs woman, by now deeply in shock, came back to the counter, stamped the papers, collected the fee, and Douglas and the Security agent ran for the gate, the Security guy carrying all five guns because Douglas was not allowed to handle them. They made it in time.

Personally, I find airline freakouts a positive development, as they break up the tedium of flying. I envision a day when you can request a flight with a deranged crew member on board, just as you can request a seat upgrade. I see a time when it will be possible to have a pool on which crew member will go apes**t in the air. “My money’s on the co-pilot. Give you three to one.”

Maybe the meltdowns will spread to the TSA. I can hardly wait for that.

Comments (32)

Top Rated
All Comments
from Happy Myles wrote 2 years 1 week ago

Dave,
You may like the break in tedium. Myself, I am an old man, I miss the olden days when you handed the beautiful stewardess (not flight attendant) your rifle in a soft case, and with a smile, she handed you a perfect martini in chilled glass. Your rifle was snugged away in the cabin.

+8 Good Comment? | | Report
from WA Mtnhunter wrote 2 years 1 week ago

Amen, Happy. One might even loosen his necktie after a Scotch or two. Now you are lucky if a hairy-legged, unkempt, hiker type in shorts and a tee shirt is not sitting next to you.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Mark-1 wrote 2 years 1 week ago

DoJ, FBI, CIA!!!

All wanna catch Old David,

And put him away!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Carney wrote 2 years 1 week ago

Used to be that when you checked baggage and declared a firearm they openned the case to inspect it for safety (not that the majority have a clue of what a safe firearm even looks like). The last two flights my wife was on just this year, she went to open the case but was shut down by the agent, "No, no! Don't open it. It freaks people out!"

So I ask, "Why exactly did they ever inspect a checked firearm?!?!?!"

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from NHshtr wrote 2 years 1 week ago

Dave,

It's not a break in the tedium - it's a PIA.

On the other topic, I'll take the three to one and put my money on the pilot going apes**t!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Michigan Gunner wrote 2 years 1 week ago

Five Rifles! What a shock! It's lucky she is still with us. I guess I won't tell her how many I have.

MG

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from RockySquirrel wrote 2 years 1 week ago

Speaking of airlines; I have a friend of my significant other, who was a flight attendant, and when she got older a reservations clerk and then when they "downsized", they made her to a middle aged baggage handler, yes thats right a 50+ year old grandmother forced to toss bags around, at night, in the winter. And when the company stopped paying into her pension fund, forced the pilots and current flight attendants to take a pay cut and then finally laid her off with no heath insurance and dumped her pension on the federal pension trust, she was looking for a job and competing with 20 something kids for crummy starting jobs. After working her whole life. Maybe thats why they are losing it. I am a strong believer in capitalism, but this isn't it. This is crap. Remember that on election day.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from RockySquirrel wrote 2 years 1 week ago

Have another interesting travel story. Standing in line in customs coming back from Heathrow into Dulles, maybe 5 years ago. (no guns involved), a woman kept jumping line. Sneaking in, here and there. Claiming she will miss her connecting flight. Fruitless idea. When she got her luggage all stacked up on a cart, the guys in blue were waiting for her. And it wasn't to escort her to a connecting flight. Off she went to the "special" examining room. She drew attention to herself and they smelled something's up. I went right through. THE MORAL OF THE STORY; No matter what your opinion of the TSA pat down police, When traveling international you ARE ALWAYS being watched. You can bet that gun case was searched away from prying eyes.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from RockySquirrel wrote 2 years 1 week ago

Ran into a British pilot in bar in Korea who calls Heathrow the world's only construction site with its own airport.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from PbHead wrote 2 years 1 week ago

Sometimes I am sorry I missed the good old days and travel was by ship. When was the last time one took a ship to Africa, Alaska or Europe to hunt?

Happy Easter Season to All

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from mike55 wrote 2 years 1 week ago

To Lead Head,

When was the last time one took a train to hunt or travel, excepting maybe the Alaska RR, the Algoma Central and maybe a few other wilderness only RR's? RR's are another great way to travel. A lot more scenery to see than a ship and travels much faster. I guess everybody's to busy to use such archaic forms of travel. I think things would be different if it weren't for the electronic world. Computers, then the internet, cell phones, then smart phones, 400+ chan. cable TV then huge HD TV's, facebook, twitter, blogs(guilty on that one and the net), etc., etc. All great time consumers or wasters depending on how one looks at it. I miss traveling by train when I was a kid. My father was an RR engineer. We had a free pass for our family to ride any of the company's passenger trains and half fare on any other RR's trains. That was before Amtrak when all the private RR's had there own pass. trains. We could ride or walk for that matter down to our local depot in central Wisconsin and be dropped off in downtown Milw. or Chicago in a matter of a couple of hours, with no driving hassles, tolls, stop and go traffic. Try doing that with any other form of transportation! Those were the days. I was just old enough to catch the tail end of it. That was back when the trains ran on time or they would here from the Feds, unlike today's trains and planes! My wife, infant son and I rode the Algoma Central RR up in Ontario a while back. It was a 13 car bus/taxi that picks up and drops off canoeists, cottagers, fisherman, hunters, snowmobilers, tourists, in the remote wilderness where no roads exist. It's really something to see/experience and the scenery is breathe taking, especially in the early fall with the color change. I feel sorry for my kids and the younger generations to miss some of the way it used to be for us of age or aging.

Happy Easter to You and All

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from wingshooter54 wrote 2 years 1 week ago

TSA is like the rest of the govt. -- incompetent, corrupt, clueless, irresponsible, and arrogant. I heard they are advertising TSA job openings on PIZZA BOXES!!!! and, have spent 20 times as much as the previous company handling airport security. Plus, they have let some actual terrorists get through while pissing off several million honest taxpayers. Sounds more and more like the government.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from bluegraytx wrote 2 years 1 week ago

I was at the Anchorage airport enroute to Dallas after a successful black bear hunt. When my carry-ons went through the machine the elderly TSA lady went into a state of apoplexy when she spotted a no-no. I immediately realized she'd found a misfire that I'd been saving to have analyzed, a misfire that I'd searched for amongst my luggage for two days and could not find. Immediately, of course, two TSA gentlemen arrived and escorted me to a table where they proceeded to ask me questions from a published government form. After listening to my sorry-ass apology, I was told to relax. This happens every day, the agent said. With that my dud round was confiscated and I was sent on my way. The point is this: Your location makes a big difference in how you're treated. Places like Anchorage deal with a host of hunters coming and going every day, and most of the agents are probably hunters as well. In faraway lands, on the other hand, you're often dealing with folks who've never fired a gun and may even be terrified at the thought, or, God forbid, you're at the Canadian border dealing with an a**hole customs agent who despises all things American, starting with you; and who believes the world would be a perfect place if all American gun owners were handcuffed, taken out behind the custom's booth, and executed, preferably with their own weapon; and who will use every Gestapo tactic in the book in an attempt to catch you in a contradiction so they can refuse entry and send your miserable butt back in the direction from whence it came.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from deadeyedick wrote 2 years 1 week ago

GOOD THING THEY DID NOT CHECK HIS SHOES AND FOUND ALL THE AMMO HE HAD HIDDEN IN HIS SOCK

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from tom warner wrote 2 years 1 week ago

My first flight took place in he late 50's when a wealthy friend took me on a quail hunting expedition to Georgia. The smiling pilots offered to carry our soft-cased guns up in the cabin and our gorgeous stewardess escorted us to our seats. Plane was a DC something - props. Since then I have flown countless times and feel that I now live in an alien world, which I frankly dislike intensely. When I took my final hunting flight 2 years ago, I breathed a sigh of relief, thinking that I would never have to go through that horrible experience again, one of the few benefits of growing old. It may be that the airlines are simply incapable of dealing with the enormous hordes of human cattle that they are now faced with. The whole thing has now been made worse by the frequently absurd security regulations put in place by government idiots. Yes, Lead Head, some of us still do use the railroads to go places. I traveled to Saskatchewan each year for more than 25 years and when time permitted took the train across Canada from NYS to avoid flying, which was a thoroughly pleasant experience. In addition, we have taken the railroad many times from Sept Isles, Quebec up to Schaefferville in Labrador to hunt, fish or canoe, a great and scenic adventure through deep wilderness that I always looked forward to. The day may come when fuel expense and scarcity will finish the airlines and we will all return to days yore when travel will be by other means. Meantime, it's been a great life. Happy Easter everyone!

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Zermoid wrote 2 years 1 week ago

I am too "young" to have seen the Really "Good Ole Days" when you could carry a loaded gun on board a plane and nobody cared.

There weren't any hijackings in those days either.
Co-incidence? I think not.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from RockySquirrel wrote 2 years 1 week ago

Tom Warner; This may sound stupid, but tell me more. Those train trips seem really interesting. May dad was a railroad man, always heavy freight, never passengers. It was a rough life. Freight has to move regardless of weekends, holiday or weather. But I digress.

Yet in my nearly 6 decades, I have never been on a train. Where can I find out more about some of your trips? Got a web site(s)? Tourist site?

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Happy Myles wrote 2 years 1 week ago

WAM.
Often you are lucky if the hairy legged hiker has had a bath.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from tom warner wrote 2 years 1 week ago

To Rocky Squirrel: I hardly know where to begin. Many years ago, during the early 1950's, a huge mine complex (mostly iron) was opened up in the Labrador wilds at a place called Schaeferville, and a railroad was driven through up onto the Laurentian plateau along the Moise River (famous salmon stream) to reach the mines - I think over 300 miles. Quite a feat! This was through a total wilderness. Some friends and I were among the first to travel on this train. The country is laced with thousands of lakes and rivers and we went on a canoe/fishing trip to fish this virgin and mostly unmapped country. The train would stop anywhere you wished along the track and unload your gear and canoes off the boxcar and you could take off into the blue from there. You could simply wave them down on the way back. I had studied what maps were available and had decided on a likely looking huge lake system to the west of the tracks. Never fished. We had a great and sometimes hairy adventure along with fantastic fishing for Lakers, Landlocks, and Northerns. The details would make a long article. The country was gorgeous and untouched; a mixture of tundra along the ridges (eskers) and open forest along the lakes and rivers. Lots of Caribou. And total freedom. The mines are now closed, but the train still runs(I presume)and now is owned by Indians and Eskimos who use it to reach their little settlements and Schaefferville. Our most recent trip was around 10 years ago and the country seemed as wild as ever. Schaefferville is now the jumping off place for Caribou hunters and fisherman and you can fly there if you wish. I'd much rather take the train. It leaves from Sept-Isles on the north shore of the St. Lawrence. I am sure that you can find the Labrador Railroad on-line. There are some outfitters in the country, but not as many as you might expect. Still a gateway to on-your-own adventure in a huge wilderness. The trips that I took across Canada to Saskatchewan were really fun. The Canadian railways are (or were) vastly superior to our own shoddy and fallen-apart systems, with great and quite luxurious accommodations and service. If you have the time, it's the way to go. Or was anyway. Always happy to answer questions.

+4 Good Comment? | | Report
from RockySquirrel wrote 2 years 1 week ago

Thanks Tom. Appreciate the outlook. That sounds like something I'd want to do. Also sounds like some great memories there.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Carney wrote 2 years 1 week ago

What a weird world we live in. Today, the "beautiful stewardess" just may be transgendered. Just sayin'...

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from RockySquirrel wrote 2 years 1 week ago

Carney; THANKS for putting that thought in my head. I will be fighting to get that image out of my brain for a while.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from WA Mtnhunter wrote 2 years 1 week ago

Yep, many of the "attendants" of today would only appeal to the likes of Elton John and Barney Frank.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Longbeard wrote 2 years 1 week ago

Back in the 80’s, I was traveling with a group to hunt whitewing dove in Mexico. Somehow, 2 of the digits in the serial number on one of my shotguns got switched from the form I filled out for the outfitter when being copied to the MX gun license application. Of course, this was not noted until we hit the first checkpoint south of Matamoros. Fortunately, our escort was a Tamaulipas policeman, so he took the Federale aside for a little chat. A short while later, he came back to our van, took one of the packed lunches, and went back to the Federale. A few minutes later, we were on our way with my gun still in our possession. Oh, for the good old days when such things could be resolved for a sandwich and some chips…and when Tamaulipas was a safe place to be.

DEP, TSA agents are not exempt from freak outs. One was arrested just a few weeks ago for throwing hot coffee on a pilot who suggested she tone down her profanity laced conversation at a JFK security check point. His reaction: “she should switch to decaf”.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Longbeard wrote 2 years 1 week ago

BTW, I tried to include the link to the USA Today site re: the TSA freak out story but the F&S "administrator" apparenly read some part of it as obscene and would not let me post it. But anyone interested can google it.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from fox4 wrote 2 years 1 week ago

Was Orwell a fiction writer or prophet?
DoJ sell guns to drug cartels in Mexico who destroy our youth. Our government trains mujahideen rebels who later call themselves Al-Queda and use those tatics in Afganistan against our troops.
An honest american sportsman is molested for purchasing firearms which the offending nation licensed for sale.
What is next, strip searching grandmothers? Oh wait, that already happened.
Some are more equal than others????

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from UplandHunter001 wrote 2 years 1 week ago

I flew through Philadelphia 5 years ago and the agents at the check-in desk asked to see my rifle. I opened the case, and it seemed they has not seen a rifle with a high-powered scope before. The agents looked at it with interest and said, "Wow, look at that thing, you could pick someone off in the A Terminal from here with that thing."
Each agent had a smile, I said nothing, put the gun in the case and was on my way. It just seems strange to me that someone would say that out-loud in a airport. Crazy.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from bassman06 wrote 2 years 1 week ago

First, if we were meant to fly, we'd grow wings! Second, I have to inquire to y'all, how do I transport a fishing pole without them damaging it and whats the best idea for transportation devices for them?

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Tim Platt wrote 2 years 1 week ago

One of the children that grew up in our neighborhood attempted to bring me back a bloody turban from Afghanistan so that I could display it with my deer antlers.

Customs was not cooperative... I think airline employees are hired by the Taliban.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Anhinga wrote 2 years 1 week ago

In '79 or '80 I was doing work for WEPCo in the U-P and one of my weeks there coincided with the opener for grouse season. So I took my shotgun along for the chance I'd have a bit of 'down time'. Got off the plane in Escanaba and waited on my bags and shotgun. Bags came out but no gun case. I asked about it, showing my checked bag receipt and the gentleman said he'd call Marquette, where the plane would spend the night and assure me it was on the plane. He did, it was and he told me to be there the next morning at 8:30 and he'd have it for me. I came into the terminal and inquired at the ticket counter. The young lady had been notified that I'd be looking for the 'lost baggage' and as she handed it to me asked where I'd be grouse hunting. I said I didn't know and she handed me a local map with the DNR address on it and said good luck. I did get 5 grouse over two afternoons of hunting, after getting excellent directions from the 'grouse guy' at the local DNR office.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Redford wrote 2 years 1 week ago

As a kid I was fortunate enough to fly a couple times a year. I remember my grandparents putting on their Sunday's best clothes, all ironed and spotless. I was told to wear a tie and look presentable because flying in a plane was one of those special times.

These days I may as well be on the city bus!

Tom Warner, that place, Schaeferville sounds really cool. I bet you could write some great stories about those trips!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from dtownley wrote 2 years 1 week ago

BASSMANo6, PVC pipe ITS HEAVY BUT THEY AIN'T THAT GOOD.Had a wonderful trip to the Ausable that year. Every time I see that tube it brings back the memories...all good

0 Good Comment? | | Report

Post a Comment

from Happy Myles wrote 2 years 1 week ago

Dave,
You may like the break in tedium. Myself, I am an old man, I miss the olden days when you handed the beautiful stewardess (not flight attendant) your rifle in a soft case, and with a smile, she handed you a perfect martini in chilled glass. Your rifle was snugged away in the cabin.

+8 Good Comment? | | Report
from tom warner wrote 2 years 1 week ago

To Rocky Squirrel: I hardly know where to begin. Many years ago, during the early 1950's, a huge mine complex (mostly iron) was opened up in the Labrador wilds at a place called Schaeferville, and a railroad was driven through up onto the Laurentian plateau along the Moise River (famous salmon stream) to reach the mines - I think over 300 miles. Quite a feat! This was through a total wilderness. Some friends and I were among the first to travel on this train. The country is laced with thousands of lakes and rivers and we went on a canoe/fishing trip to fish this virgin and mostly unmapped country. The train would stop anywhere you wished along the track and unload your gear and canoes off the boxcar and you could take off into the blue from there. You could simply wave them down on the way back. I had studied what maps were available and had decided on a likely looking huge lake system to the west of the tracks. Never fished. We had a great and sometimes hairy adventure along with fantastic fishing for Lakers, Landlocks, and Northerns. The details would make a long article. The country was gorgeous and untouched; a mixture of tundra along the ridges (eskers) and open forest along the lakes and rivers. Lots of Caribou. And total freedom. The mines are now closed, but the train still runs(I presume)and now is owned by Indians and Eskimos who use it to reach their little settlements and Schaefferville. Our most recent trip was around 10 years ago and the country seemed as wild as ever. Schaefferville is now the jumping off place for Caribou hunters and fisherman and you can fly there if you wish. I'd much rather take the train. It leaves from Sept-Isles on the north shore of the St. Lawrence. I am sure that you can find the Labrador Railroad on-line. There are some outfitters in the country, but not as many as you might expect. Still a gateway to on-your-own adventure in a huge wilderness. The trips that I took across Canada to Saskatchewan were really fun. The Canadian railways are (or were) vastly superior to our own shoddy and fallen-apart systems, with great and quite luxurious accommodations and service. If you have the time, it's the way to go. Or was anyway. Always happy to answer questions.

+4 Good Comment? | | Report
from WA Mtnhunter wrote 2 years 1 week ago

Amen, Happy. One might even loosen his necktie after a Scotch or two. Now you are lucky if a hairy-legged, unkempt, hiker type in shorts and a tee shirt is not sitting next to you.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from mike55 wrote 2 years 1 week ago

To Lead Head,

When was the last time one took a train to hunt or travel, excepting maybe the Alaska RR, the Algoma Central and maybe a few other wilderness only RR's? RR's are another great way to travel. A lot more scenery to see than a ship and travels much faster. I guess everybody's to busy to use such archaic forms of travel. I think things would be different if it weren't for the electronic world. Computers, then the internet, cell phones, then smart phones, 400+ chan. cable TV then huge HD TV's, facebook, twitter, blogs(guilty on that one and the net), etc., etc. All great time consumers or wasters depending on how one looks at it. I miss traveling by train when I was a kid. My father was an RR engineer. We had a free pass for our family to ride any of the company's passenger trains and half fare on any other RR's trains. That was before Amtrak when all the private RR's had there own pass. trains. We could ride or walk for that matter down to our local depot in central Wisconsin and be dropped off in downtown Milw. or Chicago in a matter of a couple of hours, with no driving hassles, tolls, stop and go traffic. Try doing that with any other form of transportation! Those were the days. I was just old enough to catch the tail end of it. That was back when the trains ran on time or they would here from the Feds, unlike today's trains and planes! My wife, infant son and I rode the Algoma Central RR up in Ontario a while back. It was a 13 car bus/taxi that picks up and drops off canoeists, cottagers, fisherman, hunters, snowmobilers, tourists, in the remote wilderness where no roads exist. It's really something to see/experience and the scenery is breathe taking, especially in the early fall with the color change. I feel sorry for my kids and the younger generations to miss some of the way it used to be for us of age or aging.

Happy Easter to You and All

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from bluegraytx wrote 2 years 1 week ago

I was at the Anchorage airport enroute to Dallas after a successful black bear hunt. When my carry-ons went through the machine the elderly TSA lady went into a state of apoplexy when she spotted a no-no. I immediately realized she'd found a misfire that I'd been saving to have analyzed, a misfire that I'd searched for amongst my luggage for two days and could not find. Immediately, of course, two TSA gentlemen arrived and escorted me to a table where they proceeded to ask me questions from a published government form. After listening to my sorry-ass apology, I was told to relax. This happens every day, the agent said. With that my dud round was confiscated and I was sent on my way. The point is this: Your location makes a big difference in how you're treated. Places like Anchorage deal with a host of hunters coming and going every day, and most of the agents are probably hunters as well. In faraway lands, on the other hand, you're often dealing with folks who've never fired a gun and may even be terrified at the thought, or, God forbid, you're at the Canadian border dealing with an a**hole customs agent who despises all things American, starting with you; and who believes the world would be a perfect place if all American gun owners were handcuffed, taken out behind the custom's booth, and executed, preferably with their own weapon; and who will use every Gestapo tactic in the book in an attempt to catch you in a contradiction so they can refuse entry and send your miserable butt back in the direction from whence it came.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from tom warner wrote 2 years 1 week ago

My first flight took place in he late 50's when a wealthy friend took me on a quail hunting expedition to Georgia. The smiling pilots offered to carry our soft-cased guns up in the cabin and our gorgeous stewardess escorted us to our seats. Plane was a DC something - props. Since then I have flown countless times and feel that I now live in an alien world, which I frankly dislike intensely. When I took my final hunting flight 2 years ago, I breathed a sigh of relief, thinking that I would never have to go through that horrible experience again, one of the few benefits of growing old. It may be that the airlines are simply incapable of dealing with the enormous hordes of human cattle that they are now faced with. The whole thing has now been made worse by the frequently absurd security regulations put in place by government idiots. Yes, Lead Head, some of us still do use the railroads to go places. I traveled to Saskatchewan each year for more than 25 years and when time permitted took the train across Canada from NYS to avoid flying, which was a thoroughly pleasant experience. In addition, we have taken the railroad many times from Sept Isles, Quebec up to Schaefferville in Labrador to hunt, fish or canoe, a great and scenic adventure through deep wilderness that I always looked forward to. The day may come when fuel expense and scarcity will finish the airlines and we will all return to days yore when travel will be by other means. Meantime, it's been a great life. Happy Easter everyone!

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Carney wrote 2 years 1 week ago

Used to be that when you checked baggage and declared a firearm they openned the case to inspect it for safety (not that the majority have a clue of what a safe firearm even looks like). The last two flights my wife was on just this year, she went to open the case but was shut down by the agent, "No, no! Don't open it. It freaks people out!"

So I ask, "Why exactly did they ever inspect a checked firearm?!?!?!"

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from RockySquirrel wrote 2 years 1 week ago

Speaking of airlines; I have a friend of my significant other, who was a flight attendant, and when she got older a reservations clerk and then when they "downsized", they made her to a middle aged baggage handler, yes thats right a 50+ year old grandmother forced to toss bags around, at night, in the winter. And when the company stopped paying into her pension fund, forced the pilots and current flight attendants to take a pay cut and then finally laid her off with no heath insurance and dumped her pension on the federal pension trust, she was looking for a job and competing with 20 something kids for crummy starting jobs. After working her whole life. Maybe thats why they are losing it. I am a strong believer in capitalism, but this isn't it. This is crap. Remember that on election day.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from RockySquirrel wrote 2 years 1 week ago

Have another interesting travel story. Standing in line in customs coming back from Heathrow into Dulles, maybe 5 years ago. (no guns involved), a woman kept jumping line. Sneaking in, here and there. Claiming she will miss her connecting flight. Fruitless idea. When she got her luggage all stacked up on a cart, the guys in blue were waiting for her. And it wasn't to escort her to a connecting flight. Off she went to the "special" examining room. She drew attention to herself and they smelled something's up. I went right through. THE MORAL OF THE STORY; No matter what your opinion of the TSA pat down police, When traveling international you ARE ALWAYS being watched. You can bet that gun case was searched away from prying eyes.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from RockySquirrel wrote 2 years 1 week ago

Ran into a British pilot in bar in Korea who calls Heathrow the world's only construction site with its own airport.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from deadeyedick wrote 2 years 1 week ago

GOOD THING THEY DID NOT CHECK HIS SHOES AND FOUND ALL THE AMMO HE HAD HIDDEN IN HIS SOCK

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Happy Myles wrote 2 years 1 week ago

WAM.
Often you are lucky if the hairy legged hiker has had a bath.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from fox4 wrote 2 years 1 week ago

Was Orwell a fiction writer or prophet?
DoJ sell guns to drug cartels in Mexico who destroy our youth. Our government trains mujahideen rebels who later call themselves Al-Queda and use those tatics in Afganistan against our troops.
An honest american sportsman is molested for purchasing firearms which the offending nation licensed for sale.
What is next, strip searching grandmothers? Oh wait, that already happened.
Some are more equal than others????

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Mark-1 wrote 2 years 1 week ago

DoJ, FBI, CIA!!!

All wanna catch Old David,

And put him away!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from NHshtr wrote 2 years 1 week ago

Dave,

It's not a break in the tedium - it's a PIA.

On the other topic, I'll take the three to one and put my money on the pilot going apes**t!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Michigan Gunner wrote 2 years 1 week ago

Five Rifles! What a shock! It's lucky she is still with us. I guess I won't tell her how many I have.

MG

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from PbHead wrote 2 years 1 week ago

Sometimes I am sorry I missed the good old days and travel was by ship. When was the last time one took a ship to Africa, Alaska or Europe to hunt?

Happy Easter Season to All

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from wingshooter54 wrote 2 years 1 week ago

TSA is like the rest of the govt. -- incompetent, corrupt, clueless, irresponsible, and arrogant. I heard they are advertising TSA job openings on PIZZA BOXES!!!! and, have spent 20 times as much as the previous company handling airport security. Plus, they have let some actual terrorists get through while pissing off several million honest taxpayers. Sounds more and more like the government.

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from Zermoid wrote 2 years 1 week ago

I am too "young" to have seen the Really "Good Ole Days" when you could carry a loaded gun on board a plane and nobody cared.

There weren't any hijackings in those days either.
Co-incidence? I think not.

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from RockySquirrel wrote 2 years 1 week ago

Tom Warner; This may sound stupid, but tell me more. Those train trips seem really interesting. May dad was a railroad man, always heavy freight, never passengers. It was a rough life. Freight has to move regardless of weekends, holiday or weather. But I digress.

Yet in my nearly 6 decades, I have never been on a train. Where can I find out more about some of your trips? Got a web site(s)? Tourist site?

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from RockySquirrel wrote 2 years 1 week ago

Thanks Tom. Appreciate the outlook. That sounds like something I'd want to do. Also sounds like some great memories there.

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from Carney wrote 2 years 1 week ago

What a weird world we live in. Today, the "beautiful stewardess" just may be transgendered. Just sayin'...

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from RockySquirrel wrote 2 years 1 week ago

Carney; THANKS for putting that thought in my head. I will be fighting to get that image out of my brain for a while.

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from WA Mtnhunter wrote 2 years 1 week ago

Yep, many of the "attendants" of today would only appeal to the likes of Elton John and Barney Frank.

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from Longbeard wrote 2 years 1 week ago

Back in the 80’s, I was traveling with a group to hunt whitewing dove in Mexico. Somehow, 2 of the digits in the serial number on one of my shotguns got switched from the form I filled out for the outfitter when being copied to the MX gun license application. Of course, this was not noted until we hit the first checkpoint south of Matamoros. Fortunately, our escort was a Tamaulipas policeman, so he took the Federale aside for a little chat. A short while later, he came back to our van, took one of the packed lunches, and went back to the Federale. A few minutes later, we were on our way with my gun still in our possession. Oh, for the good old days when such things could be resolved for a sandwich and some chips…and when Tamaulipas was a safe place to be.

DEP, TSA agents are not exempt from freak outs. One was arrested just a few weeks ago for throwing hot coffee on a pilot who suggested she tone down her profanity laced conversation at a JFK security check point. His reaction: “she should switch to decaf”.

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from Longbeard wrote 2 years 1 week ago

BTW, I tried to include the link to the USA Today site re: the TSA freak out story but the F&S "administrator" apparenly read some part of it as obscene and would not let me post it. But anyone interested can google it.

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from UplandHunter001 wrote 2 years 1 week ago

I flew through Philadelphia 5 years ago and the agents at the check-in desk asked to see my rifle. I opened the case, and it seemed they has not seen a rifle with a high-powered scope before. The agents looked at it with interest and said, "Wow, look at that thing, you could pick someone off in the A Terminal from here with that thing."
Each agent had a smile, I said nothing, put the gun in the case and was on my way. It just seems strange to me that someone would say that out-loud in a airport. Crazy.

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from bassman06 wrote 2 years 1 week ago

First, if we were meant to fly, we'd grow wings! Second, I have to inquire to y'all, how do I transport a fishing pole without them damaging it and whats the best idea for transportation devices for them?

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from Tim Platt wrote 2 years 1 week ago

One of the children that grew up in our neighborhood attempted to bring me back a bloody turban from Afghanistan so that I could display it with my deer antlers.

Customs was not cooperative... I think airline employees are hired by the Taliban.

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from Anhinga wrote 2 years 1 week ago

In '79 or '80 I was doing work for WEPCo in the U-P and one of my weeks there coincided with the opener for grouse season. So I took my shotgun along for the chance I'd have a bit of 'down time'. Got off the plane in Escanaba and waited on my bags and shotgun. Bags came out but no gun case. I asked about it, showing my checked bag receipt and the gentleman said he'd call Marquette, where the plane would spend the night and assure me it was on the plane. He did, it was and he told me to be there the next morning at 8:30 and he'd have it for me. I came into the terminal and inquired at the ticket counter. The young lady had been notified that I'd be looking for the 'lost baggage' and as she handed it to me asked where I'd be grouse hunting. I said I didn't know and she handed me a local map with the DNR address on it and said good luck. I did get 5 grouse over two afternoons of hunting, after getting excellent directions from the 'grouse guy' at the local DNR office.

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from Redford wrote 2 years 1 week ago

As a kid I was fortunate enough to fly a couple times a year. I remember my grandparents putting on their Sunday's best clothes, all ironed and spotless. I was told to wear a tie and look presentable because flying in a plane was one of those special times.

These days I may as well be on the city bus!

Tom Warner, that place, Schaeferville sounds really cool. I bet you could write some great stories about those trips!

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from dtownley wrote 2 years 1 week ago

BASSMANo6, PVC pipe ITS HEAVY BUT THEY AIN'T THAT GOOD.Had a wonderful trip to the Ausable that year. Every time I see that tube it brings back the memories...all good

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