Please Sign In

Please enter a valid username and password
  • Log in with Facebook
» Not a member? Take a moment to register
» Forgot Username or Password

Why Register?
Signing up could earn you gear (click here to learn how)! It also keeps offensive content off our site.

Laser Follies: When Rangefinders Don't Agree

Recent Comments

Categories

Recent Posts

Archives

Syndicate

Google Reader or Homepage
Add to My Yahoo!
Add to My AOL

The Gun Nuts
in your Inbox

Enter your email address to get our new post everyday.

December 12, 2012

Laser Follies: When Rangefinders Don't Agree

By David E. Petzal

I spent the past week in Kansas, a place of very little culture but very many whitetail deer, which is a better reason to go someplace than culture. I was hunting out of elevated blinds with a friend who is a highly experienced hunter and a very good spotter of cloven-hoofed ungulates. Each of us had a laser rangefinder. Mine was in my binocular; his was separate.

What we noticed pretty quickly was that neither rangefinder ever agreed…ever. Sometimes the difference was only a few yards, but sometimes it was 50 yards or more. In addition, my rangefinder also gave Weird Readings. It would say that a deer was 152 yards away when it was perfectly obvious the beast was way over 300. This may have been caused by fog, which we had, or by the beam bouncing off weeds and brush that I couldn’t see but which the laser could. It was, as Richard Pryor used to say, a nerve-shattering experience.

Before my friend bought his rangefinder, he asked the dealer for the five he had on hand, took them outside and tried them out. Not one of them agreed with another, so he bought the one that gave the middle reading.

I found that if I lased a deer and got a reading of 371 yards, for example, and then did it again and got 370, that’s probably what the yardage was. If I got 371 and then 275, something was wrong somewhere.

I like laser rangefinders, and use them a lot, but like any mechanical device they will screw you if they get a chance. Take what they say with a grain of salt. That’s the reason I always carry three compasses.

Comments (28)

Top Rated
All Comments
from cb bob wrote 1 year 18 weeks ago

I bought an inexpensive range finder, and do use it when I hunt, but mostly to give me the distance to a couple landmarks in the area I'm hunting. I checked it at the rifle range, and from the 100 yard line it was reading 102 to the target. From the 200 yard line it read 198. I figured this was close enough, since I rarely get a shot past 100 yards anyway. The battery indicator is a little screwy, but I put in a fresh one at the beginning of each season, and it works every time I use it.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Amflyer wrote 1 year 18 weeks ago

All these lasers, and rangefinding reticles and adjustable turrets are a menace to hunting.

One of my buddy's-cousin's-uncle's-girlfriend's-chiropractor got so discombobulated that he managed to misadjust everything in a major way, and after 3.7459 seconds of bullet in-flight time managed to hit himself in the left foot, leaving him permanently cloven-ungulatoid.

Just hold four inches high and let 'er fly. (If you are hunting in Australia or South America, or other Southern hemisphere continents, then aim four inches low and let 'er go...)

+4 Good Comment? | | Report
from deadeyedick wrote 1 year 18 weeks ago

And that is why I seldom use them. Just like you I had problems with range finders and now I do not trust them. besides what ever happened to learning how to judge distances.? I really do not see the need to know exactly how far a game animal is. My rifle does not care all that much if an animal is exactly 150 yards out, it can be 155 or 140 and I can still make the shot. Perhaps when it comes to extreme distances it may have it's uses but I am not going to shoot at any big game animal over my personal limit of 300 yards

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from HogBlog wrote 1 year 18 weeks ago

I am a big fan of my rangefinders, but I have experienced some of that weird behavior... especially in freezing fog and drizzle. Makes sense, of course, since there's a lot of reflective material in the air, but it's sure frustrating when you've got a client trying to make the call on a big mule deer. Fortunately, I've ranged that place enough that I know about where the landmarks are, and was able to tell him not to shoot.

For my own hunting, about the only time I rely on a rangefinder is for bowhunting. Yardage makes a huge difference there. If I'm hunting with a rifle and I think I need a rangefinder to make a good shot, then I sling the rifle and try to get closer.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from duckcreekdick wrote 1 year 18 weeks ago

I figure if you need a rangefinder to help you on a typical big game hunt, chances are good the critter is too far away to shoot and you should get off your lazy butt and learn how to hunt. Just a crotchety old guys' opinion.

+4 Good Comment? | | Report
from crm3006 wrote 1 year 18 weeks ago

Could be I'm not using my rangefinder the right way.
When I hunt from a stand, I will range a rock, tree, clump of trees, whatever, in about a 180 degree circle in my immediate view. After that, knowing where +/- 200 yds. is, I wait for the deer to come close to a known range of 200 yds. I check the rangefinder at known ranges of 100 and 200 yds. prior to every season, but have yet to experience any weird behavior from my Nikon 600.
I have used it from West Texas heat to moderate cold to
-5 degree cold in New Mexico, and from sea level to 5000 feet, +/-. The only time I have used a rangefinder when spot and stalk hunting was to range shots after the fact.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Chewylouie wrote 1 year 18 weeks ago

I don't use a range finder, never have. I just estimate. Some thing I do is take my nocs (if I have them with me) and it says 140 feet at 1000 yards. I did a little math (while I was hunting, It works well to to keep from getting board) and figured up how much I should be able to see at certain distances. It works pretty well for the way I hunt.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from PbHead wrote 1 year 18 weeks ago

I have never had a problem with my rangefinder so now I am scared and need to confirm the readings. However, the best uses I have found is confirming distance to landmarks from a stand and winning bets.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Savageshot wrote 1 year 18 weeks ago

AS the old saying gos, measure twice cut once

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from SD Bob wrote 1 year 18 weeks ago

Center of chest hold, shoot, celebrate and then range how far you just shot your critter. That's what the tv hunters do, they just don't show it to you in that order

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Happy Myles wrote 1 year 18 weeks ago

I have used several different brands of range finders extensively in all kinds of conditions experiencing some of the same inconsistencies. A. Couple of things I have found seem to help. If the range is long, and the animal blends into the background move the lense to a nearby bold colored object, be it a rock, bush or tree. The laser seems to focus on the most prominent colored nearby object, or at least be confused by it. I know nothing about optics, but have used them a lot. Also, take them to a known rifle range, if they do not work send them back with an explanation.

The best I have ever used are made by Swarovski, but they cost as much as an expensive hunting trip.. Once on target they will change yardage with each step the animal takes. Kindest Regards For The Holidays

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Ontario Honker ... wrote 1 year 18 weeks ago

I have no use for such things. Used mechanical parallax type rangefinders when surveying forest roads forty years ago. They too were notoriously inaccurate but only intended for crude estimations and short distances. I agree with others above: if you feel the need to use a rangefinder you're probably pushing the limits of your gun and your ability anyway. If you can't tell if a deer or elk is 200 yards away or less, then you need to be hunting with someone who can for a bit longer. Anything beyond that distance should be left alone to go about what's left of its life uncrippled. Guesstimation, whether with technocrap or bravado, has no place behind a hunting rifle. Belongs at a Vegas blackjack table. Can't cripple anything but your pocketbook and ego there.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from TED FORD wrote 1 year 18 weeks ago

I have a Leica now after a number of "this"ll do's" and I like it just fine.Wonder how the old scribes (Jack O'Connor) would have recorded those long shots had they had a reasonably accurate rangefinder.Merry Christmas boys and I hope you get a good rangefinder in your stocking.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from O Garcia wrote 1 year 18 weeks ago

I think I'm going back to using the optical rangefinders salvaged from the battleship Bismarck. If my first two ranging shots straddle the deer, the third one will be right on the boiler room.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from shane wrote 1 year 17 weeks ago

Hunt a shotgun only state. There go your rangefinder problems. Maybe I'm wrong. Are they advertising ballistic coefficients on boxes of sabot slugs now?

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Clay Cooper wrote 1 year 17 weeks ago

I have a Bushnell mounted on my bow, gives me hands free operation at full draw. As for incorporating a rangefinder into another piece of equipment such as binoculars? It's like buying a TV with a tape cassette witch either becomes outdated or breaks. In either case, your screwed! Binoculars last a long time!

As for false readings? Take a laser pointer and step out early in the morning before sunup when the air is most likely at it's highest dew point. Now place the pointer on something solid and aim it at an object 100 yards away. Step to the side and you will see the beam illuminating the moisture particles and this Shooter is why you get false readings. Another is poor optics and/or dirty lens causing dispersed beam.

Keep the barrel hot and the X-Ring full of holes.

targets UP!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Kansas243 wrote 1 year 17 weeks ago

I find the best strategy for using a rangefinder is to range trees and other large stationary objects in the area. You can start to develop a map of an area if you know a cedar tree is 175 yards away and an oak tree is 312 yards away.

That way if a deer walks out close to the cedar you don't have to waste time switching between your rangefinder and your rifle because you'll have a rough idea of the range. Plus it helps you to eventually learn range estimation.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from fordman155 wrote 1 year 17 weeks ago

Several years of scouting with a laser rangefinder well before the season begins has given me a better sense of determining distance. I use the rangefinder a lot in the pre-season, and up to about 300yds I'm pretty good at determining how far away the deer are. Beyond 300yds it is much more difficult, in my opinion, especially if the deer are higher than I am. That is when the rangefinder really shines. The deer I took this year was 533yds and there is no way I would have been able to get it w/o a laser rangefinder.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from FishnFast wrote 1 year 17 weeks ago

I use a (brand withheld) arc rangefinder only to spot trees at 20-30-40 yds at 360* rather than target a deer which will see movement that close. I hunt Ohio, rifles NOT allowed, and don't need a range finder to tell me what the distance is, if I see it, I can shoot it, especially since its all thick woods, no fields or open areas.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from FishnFast wrote 1 year 17 weeks ago

Earlier comment was spotting trees for Bow hunting only.....
don't use during gun season

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from WA Mtnhunter wrote 1 year 17 weeks ago

Like any other measuring tool, its calibration should be checked and the operator has to know how to properly employ it. Buying the el cheapo ones is like buying fine instruments from Harbor Freight. I would never again hunt the Rockies or prairies without one.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Tim Platt wrote 1 year 17 weeks ago

I'm tired of waiting. I'm tired of people looking the other way. I'm tired of listening 24/7 to editorials about how guns should be banned. Where are you David? "All that is required for evil to prevail is for good men to do nothing."

We have a mass murder in Connecticut and the media proclaims it is time for gun control. I wholeheartedly disagree.

If there had been a teacher, or a police officer, or anyone besides an insane 24 year old in the building with a gun there would not be 27 dead people. The body count would be far less.

Unarming honest citizens is not the answer. It only leaves them more vulnerable. And if you did confiscate 300 million firearms there would still be plenty on the street and the crazies and criminals would love it.

Does prohibition ring a bell? That worked out well, didn't it? Marijuana, cocaine, heroin, methamphetamine... all illegal. Yet the supply is never ending for those who choose to disregard the law. Guns will be no different. Where's that post GUN NUT???

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from mcrumrine wrote 1 year 17 weeks ago

I bought a rangefinder (el cheapo) a couple years ago and use it the way a lot here do. I range stationary objects so I know how far away the deer is. Since I have the cheaper model it only advertises to range deer sized objects to 100yds, trees to 200, and reflective to 400. In fact it will range deer out to about 200, trees to 400-500 and reflective to 600-700. As I've said I ususally range stationary objects and those LONG ranges are just for my curiosity. It's a nice toy to play with in the blind but for spot and stalk not so much. Out of all the deer I have shot since I bought it only i has attempted to be ranged before the shot and it was out of range and in the middle of a field with nothing nearby to range. Ranging back from where it was when I hit to where I shot from it was 300 yds, which is now my maximum distance to even attempt a shot I can either attempt to get closer or wait. I have seen the fog change known ranges from 100 to 5 but that is because of reflective material in the air and every range finder will do that. As for getting mechanical devices to agree that is like trying to get a Ford and a Chevy man to agree on the best truck.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Matthew Matzek wrote 1 year 17 weeks ago

The bottom line is, like most any electronic device, if you take care of it, itll take care of you. Buy a good one. Not always the most expensive, but it aint honna be the cheapest. It's a sensitive pieve of equipment so you have to baby it.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Tim Platt wrote 1 year 17 weeks ago

Some things to think about...

• A 1997 high school shooting in Pearl, Miss., was halted by the school's vice principal after he retrieved the Colt .45 he kept in his truck.
• A 1998 middle school shooting ended when a man living next door heard gunfire and apprehended the shooter with his shotgun.
• A 2002 terrorist attack at an Israeli school was quickly stopped by an armed teacher and a school guard.
• A 2002 law school shooting in Grundy, Va., came to an abrupt conclusion when students carrying firearms confronted the shooter.
• A 2007 mall shooting in Ogden, Utah, ended when an armed off-duty police officer intervened.
• A 2009 workplace shooting in Houston, Texas, was halted by two coworkers who carried concealed handguns.
• A 2012 church shooting in Aurora, Colo., was stopped by a member of the congregation carrying a gun.
• At the recent mall shooting in Portland, Ore., the gunman took his own life minutes after being confronted by a shopper carrying a concealed weapon.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Drew McClure wrote 1 year 17 weeks ago

I think F&S voted the Leica as the best. The Leupold I have used doesn't read accurately beyond 500 and I want to say its a 750, or 600. In field use I like to keep bow shots within 30yds and in general wait for broadside rifle shots, but I have yet to imagine a dream rifle with a Bushnell eliminator scope on it, which is where long range shooting and laser ranging meat in one instrument. I would rather put a L. vxr, or Swaro glass on my next project long range carry rifle. Why let the laser algorithms have all the drama, fine tuning and fun?

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Drew McClure wrote 1 year 17 weeks ago

meet not meat but that is a F. slip I'll gladly stomach. Cheers.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from DakotaMan wrote 1 year 5 weeks ago

I've noticed that range finders emit a cone shaped signal that gets wider with distance. Anything within that cone will trigger a signal back to the hand-held device. As a result, any bush, bunch of grass or even a rolling hill between the hunter and the target could trigger a false read. To get more accurate reads quickly I often aim well above the target and then while pressing down the range button, I gently lower the rangefinder until it picks up a signal. Of course this technique only works if the horizon is clear behind the target. If there is a mountain right behind the target, it doesn't work so well.

0 Good Comment? | | Report

Post a Comment

from Amflyer wrote 1 year 18 weeks ago

All these lasers, and rangefinding reticles and adjustable turrets are a menace to hunting.

One of my buddy's-cousin's-uncle's-girlfriend's-chiropractor got so discombobulated that he managed to misadjust everything in a major way, and after 3.7459 seconds of bullet in-flight time managed to hit himself in the left foot, leaving him permanently cloven-ungulatoid.

Just hold four inches high and let 'er fly. (If you are hunting in Australia or South America, or other Southern hemisphere continents, then aim four inches low and let 'er go...)

+4 Good Comment? | | Report
from duckcreekdick wrote 1 year 18 weeks ago

I figure if you need a rangefinder to help you on a typical big game hunt, chances are good the critter is too far away to shoot and you should get off your lazy butt and learn how to hunt. Just a crotchety old guys' opinion.

+4 Good Comment? | | Report
from Ontario Honker ... wrote 1 year 18 weeks ago

I have no use for such things. Used mechanical parallax type rangefinders when surveying forest roads forty years ago. They too were notoriously inaccurate but only intended for crude estimations and short distances. I agree with others above: if you feel the need to use a rangefinder you're probably pushing the limits of your gun and your ability anyway. If you can't tell if a deer or elk is 200 yards away or less, then you need to be hunting with someone who can for a bit longer. Anything beyond that distance should be left alone to go about what's left of its life uncrippled. Guesstimation, whether with technocrap or bravado, has no place behind a hunting rifle. Belongs at a Vegas blackjack table. Can't cripple anything but your pocketbook and ego there.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from SD Bob wrote 1 year 18 weeks ago

Center of chest hold, shoot, celebrate and then range how far you just shot your critter. That's what the tv hunters do, they just don't show it to you in that order

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Happy Myles wrote 1 year 18 weeks ago

I have used several different brands of range finders extensively in all kinds of conditions experiencing some of the same inconsistencies. A. Couple of things I have found seem to help. If the range is long, and the animal blends into the background move the lense to a nearby bold colored object, be it a rock, bush or tree. The laser seems to focus on the most prominent colored nearby object, or at least be confused by it. I know nothing about optics, but have used them a lot. Also, take them to a known rifle range, if they do not work send them back with an explanation.

The best I have ever used are made by Swarovski, but they cost as much as an expensive hunting trip.. Once on target they will change yardage with each step the animal takes. Kindest Regards For The Holidays

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from cb bob wrote 1 year 18 weeks ago

I bought an inexpensive range finder, and do use it when I hunt, but mostly to give me the distance to a couple landmarks in the area I'm hunting. I checked it at the rifle range, and from the 100 yard line it was reading 102 to the target. From the 200 yard line it read 198. I figured this was close enough, since I rarely get a shot past 100 yards anyway. The battery indicator is a little screwy, but I put in a fresh one at the beginning of each season, and it works every time I use it.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from TED FORD wrote 1 year 18 weeks ago

I have a Leica now after a number of "this"ll do's" and I like it just fine.Wonder how the old scribes (Jack O'Connor) would have recorded those long shots had they had a reasonably accurate rangefinder.Merry Christmas boys and I hope you get a good rangefinder in your stocking.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Kansas243 wrote 1 year 17 weeks ago

I find the best strategy for using a rangefinder is to range trees and other large stationary objects in the area. You can start to develop a map of an area if you know a cedar tree is 175 yards away and an oak tree is 312 yards away.

That way if a deer walks out close to the cedar you don't have to waste time switching between your rangefinder and your rifle because you'll have a rough idea of the range. Plus it helps you to eventually learn range estimation.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Tim Platt wrote 1 year 17 weeks ago

Some things to think about...

• A 1997 high school shooting in Pearl, Miss., was halted by the school's vice principal after he retrieved the Colt .45 he kept in his truck.
• A 1998 middle school shooting ended when a man living next door heard gunfire and apprehended the shooter with his shotgun.
• A 2002 terrorist attack at an Israeli school was quickly stopped by an armed teacher and a school guard.
• A 2002 law school shooting in Grundy, Va., came to an abrupt conclusion when students carrying firearms confronted the shooter.
• A 2007 mall shooting in Ogden, Utah, ended when an armed off-duty police officer intervened.
• A 2009 workplace shooting in Houston, Texas, was halted by two coworkers who carried concealed handguns.
• A 2012 church shooting in Aurora, Colo., was stopped by a member of the congregation carrying a gun.
• At the recent mall shooting in Portland, Ore., the gunman took his own life minutes after being confronted by a shopper carrying a concealed weapon.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from deadeyedick wrote 1 year 18 weeks ago

And that is why I seldom use them. Just like you I had problems with range finders and now I do not trust them. besides what ever happened to learning how to judge distances.? I really do not see the need to know exactly how far a game animal is. My rifle does not care all that much if an animal is exactly 150 yards out, it can be 155 or 140 and I can still make the shot. Perhaps when it comes to extreme distances it may have it's uses but I am not going to shoot at any big game animal over my personal limit of 300 yards

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from HogBlog wrote 1 year 18 weeks ago

I am a big fan of my rangefinders, but I have experienced some of that weird behavior... especially in freezing fog and drizzle. Makes sense, of course, since there's a lot of reflective material in the air, but it's sure frustrating when you've got a client trying to make the call on a big mule deer. Fortunately, I've ranged that place enough that I know about where the landmarks are, and was able to tell him not to shoot.

For my own hunting, about the only time I rely on a rangefinder is for bowhunting. Yardage makes a huge difference there. If I'm hunting with a rifle and I think I need a rangefinder to make a good shot, then I sling the rifle and try to get closer.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from crm3006 wrote 1 year 18 weeks ago

Could be I'm not using my rangefinder the right way.
When I hunt from a stand, I will range a rock, tree, clump of trees, whatever, in about a 180 degree circle in my immediate view. After that, knowing where +/- 200 yds. is, I wait for the deer to come close to a known range of 200 yds. I check the rangefinder at known ranges of 100 and 200 yds. prior to every season, but have yet to experience any weird behavior from my Nikon 600.
I have used it from West Texas heat to moderate cold to
-5 degree cold in New Mexico, and from sea level to 5000 feet, +/-. The only time I have used a rangefinder when spot and stalk hunting was to range shots after the fact.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Chewylouie wrote 1 year 18 weeks ago

I don't use a range finder, never have. I just estimate. Some thing I do is take my nocs (if I have them with me) and it says 140 feet at 1000 yards. I did a little math (while I was hunting, It works well to to keep from getting board) and figured up how much I should be able to see at certain distances. It works pretty well for the way I hunt.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from PbHead wrote 1 year 18 weeks ago

I have never had a problem with my rangefinder so now I am scared and need to confirm the readings. However, the best uses I have found is confirming distance to landmarks from a stand and winning bets.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Savageshot wrote 1 year 18 weeks ago

AS the old saying gos, measure twice cut once

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from O Garcia wrote 1 year 18 weeks ago

I think I'm going back to using the optical rangefinders salvaged from the battleship Bismarck. If my first two ranging shots straddle the deer, the third one will be right on the boiler room.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from shane wrote 1 year 17 weeks ago

Hunt a shotgun only state. There go your rangefinder problems. Maybe I'm wrong. Are they advertising ballistic coefficients on boxes of sabot slugs now?

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Clay Cooper wrote 1 year 17 weeks ago

I have a Bushnell mounted on my bow, gives me hands free operation at full draw. As for incorporating a rangefinder into another piece of equipment such as binoculars? It's like buying a TV with a tape cassette witch either becomes outdated or breaks. In either case, your screwed! Binoculars last a long time!

As for false readings? Take a laser pointer and step out early in the morning before sunup when the air is most likely at it's highest dew point. Now place the pointer on something solid and aim it at an object 100 yards away. Step to the side and you will see the beam illuminating the moisture particles and this Shooter is why you get false readings. Another is poor optics and/or dirty lens causing dispersed beam.

Keep the barrel hot and the X-Ring full of holes.

targets UP!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from fordman155 wrote 1 year 17 weeks ago

Several years of scouting with a laser rangefinder well before the season begins has given me a better sense of determining distance. I use the rangefinder a lot in the pre-season, and up to about 300yds I'm pretty good at determining how far away the deer are. Beyond 300yds it is much more difficult, in my opinion, especially if the deer are higher than I am. That is when the rangefinder really shines. The deer I took this year was 533yds and there is no way I would have been able to get it w/o a laser rangefinder.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from FishnFast wrote 1 year 17 weeks ago

I use a (brand withheld) arc rangefinder only to spot trees at 20-30-40 yds at 360* rather than target a deer which will see movement that close. I hunt Ohio, rifles NOT allowed, and don't need a range finder to tell me what the distance is, if I see it, I can shoot it, especially since its all thick woods, no fields or open areas.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from FishnFast wrote 1 year 17 weeks ago

Earlier comment was spotting trees for Bow hunting only.....
don't use during gun season

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from WA Mtnhunter wrote 1 year 17 weeks ago

Like any other measuring tool, its calibration should be checked and the operator has to know how to properly employ it. Buying the el cheapo ones is like buying fine instruments from Harbor Freight. I would never again hunt the Rockies or prairies without one.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Tim Platt wrote 1 year 17 weeks ago

I'm tired of waiting. I'm tired of people looking the other way. I'm tired of listening 24/7 to editorials about how guns should be banned. Where are you David? "All that is required for evil to prevail is for good men to do nothing."

We have a mass murder in Connecticut and the media proclaims it is time for gun control. I wholeheartedly disagree.

If there had been a teacher, or a police officer, or anyone besides an insane 24 year old in the building with a gun there would not be 27 dead people. The body count would be far less.

Unarming honest citizens is not the answer. It only leaves them more vulnerable. And if you did confiscate 300 million firearms there would still be plenty on the street and the crazies and criminals would love it.

Does prohibition ring a bell? That worked out well, didn't it? Marijuana, cocaine, heroin, methamphetamine... all illegal. Yet the supply is never ending for those who choose to disregard the law. Guns will be no different. Where's that post GUN NUT???

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from mcrumrine wrote 1 year 17 weeks ago

I bought a rangefinder (el cheapo) a couple years ago and use it the way a lot here do. I range stationary objects so I know how far away the deer is. Since I have the cheaper model it only advertises to range deer sized objects to 100yds, trees to 200, and reflective to 400. In fact it will range deer out to about 200, trees to 400-500 and reflective to 600-700. As I've said I ususally range stationary objects and those LONG ranges are just for my curiosity. It's a nice toy to play with in the blind but for spot and stalk not so much. Out of all the deer I have shot since I bought it only i has attempted to be ranged before the shot and it was out of range and in the middle of a field with nothing nearby to range. Ranging back from where it was when I hit to where I shot from it was 300 yds, which is now my maximum distance to even attempt a shot I can either attempt to get closer or wait. I have seen the fog change known ranges from 100 to 5 but that is because of reflective material in the air and every range finder will do that. As for getting mechanical devices to agree that is like trying to get a Ford and a Chevy man to agree on the best truck.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Matthew Matzek wrote 1 year 17 weeks ago

The bottom line is, like most any electronic device, if you take care of it, itll take care of you. Buy a good one. Not always the most expensive, but it aint honna be the cheapest. It's a sensitive pieve of equipment so you have to baby it.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Drew McClure wrote 1 year 17 weeks ago

I think F&S voted the Leica as the best. The Leupold I have used doesn't read accurately beyond 500 and I want to say its a 750, or 600. In field use I like to keep bow shots within 30yds and in general wait for broadside rifle shots, but I have yet to imagine a dream rifle with a Bushnell eliminator scope on it, which is where long range shooting and laser ranging meat in one instrument. I would rather put a L. vxr, or Swaro glass on my next project long range carry rifle. Why let the laser algorithms have all the drama, fine tuning and fun?

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Drew McClure wrote 1 year 17 weeks ago

meet not meat but that is a F. slip I'll gladly stomach. Cheers.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from DakotaMan wrote 1 year 5 weeks ago

I've noticed that range finders emit a cone shaped signal that gets wider with distance. Anything within that cone will trigger a signal back to the hand-held device. As a result, any bush, bunch of grass or even a rolling hill between the hunter and the target could trigger a false read. To get more accurate reads quickly I often aim well above the target and then while pressing down the range button, I gently lower the rangefinder until it picks up a signal. Of course this technique only works if the horizon is clear behind the target. If there is a mountain right behind the target, it doesn't work so well.

0 Good Comment? | | Report

Post a Comment