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The Remington 1100 Turns 50

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April 12, 2013

The Remington 1100 Turns 50

By Phil Bourjaily

This year marks the 50th birthday of the Remington 1100, one of the handful of shotguns you can truly call revolutionary. The soft-shooting, reliable 1100 changed the way we thought about semiautomatic shotguns. This movie, the 1100 story, was produced internally at Remington and has not been seen much until now. It shows just how cutting edge the 1100 was in 1963. Plus, the narrator has the “60’s narrator” voice down pat and it is just fun to watch and listen to.

Judged against previous gas semiautos, the 1100 was vastly more reliable. Today it doesn’t compare with Brownings, Berettas, and Benellis but if you keep it clean, it will not fail you in the field. It may break down in competition and most serious 1100 target shooters—if there are any left—carry spare parts and can put their guns back in action in minutes.  A friend who hunted hard with 1100s and 11-87s for years always took his gun apart and ran the gas system parts through the dishwasher every time he shot them. He never had a problem with his gun. Incidentally, Remington’s Jay Bunting told me it’s a mistake to replace the factory O-ring with a thicker, more durable ring. All that does, he says, is potentially keep the gun from closing completely, leaving it out of battery.

At any rate, the 1100 is the best-selling semiauto ever and to celebrate the gun’s 50th, Remington has offered a run of specially decorated anniversary guns with an engraving pattern based on the 2 millionth 1100 made several years ago. It sells for $1999 and it’s a nice, well-finished gun. It is good to see that Remington can still make a nice-looking shotgun if they try. With it is my own beat-up 70s era 1100 trap gun which, like so many old 1100s, is still alive and kicking out empties.

Comments (26)

Top Rated
All Comments
from duckcreekdick wrote 1 year 4 days ago

The 1100 was a "home-run" for Remington and continues to be the standard by which other gas shotguns are compared.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from badsmerf wrote 1 year 4 days ago

The 1100 is the first shotgun I ever shot, and was eventually given to me by my dad (by default since I use it so much). I will never sell that gun and plan to give it to my son when he is old enough to start hunting (and beating on guns lol). I love this gun and its versatility.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from PbHead wrote 1 year 4 days ago

Thanks for the video Phil. I noticed that a few folks had hearing protection in the good old days, most did not. And in the final hunting scene, I enjoyed the "Jones Style" hat that might be making a comeback. We have come a long ways.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Happy Myles wrote 1 year 4 days ago

Phil,
Do they indebtify the male shooters at the range one looks very familiar.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Happy Myles wrote 1 year 4 days ago

When the 1100 came out I somehow ended up with three of them, 12, 20, and 28 gauge. They were all the rage at the skeet range and in the field. Besides ammo, I carried extra 0 rings and a can of brake cleaner. I remember being critical of the grain in the forearm of the 12 gauge and the salesman in the show room without a word exchanged it with another on the shelf in seconds. Those were the days.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from etexan wrote 1 year 4 days ago

I remember seeing one owned by my Dad's friend from work and thinking how nice it looked. Bought my first in mid-70's for $138. As is the case in a number of similar purchases, I shoulda bought two!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Mark-1 wrote 1 year 4 days ago

Owned eight 1100's in my career. Started out shooting target clays with 1100's and I'm ending my shooting career with an 1100.

This shotgun's been around so long lots of tweaks to modify the shotgun for even better performance.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from mayoaaron wrote 1 year 4 days ago

I own one of these, it was passed down from my dad who bought it in the 70s

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from mayoaaron wrote 1 year 4 days ago

I own one of these, it was passed down from my dad who bought it in the 80s

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from philbourjaily wrote 1 year 4 days ago

Happy Myles -
I was five when the movie came out so I don't know anyone in the film. Probably Remington employees, though.There are no credits other than what you see at the beginning.

Pbhead -- I miss Jones hats! I always thought they were better looking and more practical than ballcaps.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from hunterdds wrote 1 year 4 days ago

killed my first deer and every once since with an old 1100 that my dad first bought around 1967. he had the gun drilled and tapped for a scope mount back in the day when it was unheard of to do so. I have fired thousands of rounds of bird shot and hundreds of slugs and never had problems with jamming or cycling and I have to admit I am not so good about cleaning it. I bought a new 1100 in the late 1990's. it jams, sticks and gives me all kinds of problems, just goes to show they dont make em like they used to. I take the scope off and go bird hunting or shoot trap, put it back on and chase deer. I can get two inch groups with slugs at 50 yards and hit within a six inch circle out to 120. its not going to win any accuracy competitions,but the old pumpkin lobber sure puts meat in the frezzer. I want to get a new "pimped out" slug gun, money is not an issue but I can't even think about leaving that gun in the safe when I hit the woods

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Del in KS wrote 1 year 4 days ago

My old duck hunting buddy Billy D has several Belgian Brownings but the gun he shoots is his old 1100. He loves that gun but every year I kid him about using that 1100 for a boat anchor and buying a Benelli so he'll have a real shotgun.
When I was a young fellow that was the gun I wanted but could not afford.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from ishawooa wrote 1 year 3 days ago

I have owned many Browning A-5s and 1100s over the years, some new some used. I never had to carry extra parts and tools to keep the old humpbacks running so they remain my favorites. However, I always felt that I could shoot a 1100 better than the Browning, apparently the fit was more correct.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from PbHead wrote 1 year 3 days ago

Phil, I found a blaze orange hat at the local Farm & Home store this fall. Two are on the current LL Bean web page. Get yours now!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from deadeyedick wrote 1 year 3 days ago

I beg to differ. I would put my 1100's up against any semi-auto. I shot a field grade at ameateur trap for 9 straight years and never replaced any part of it . The only thing I ever added was a 30 inch trap barrel. With that gun I shot against all makes and models that cost many times what I paid for that 1100, and kept a .7 handicapp. I still own 3 1100s and would not trade or sell any of them. Keep it clean and I would guess it would shoot forever. I bought my first 1100 in 1969 and it is as good as the day I bought it.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Bernie wrote 1 year 3 days ago

I bought a Model 1100 in 16 gauge at a hardware store in Valley City, ND in 1973 for $150. Gave it to my wife when we married in 1983. I had the 28" barrel's choke opened from full to modified. In 1985 UPS delivered a green box to our house. My wife thought it might be flowers for our anniversary. It was an improved cylinder barrel, ventilated rib, 26" in length. I said, "You can't shoot pheasant roosters with a dozen roses."

Also, I inherited an 1100 from my father--a 3" 20 gauge, probably made in the late '70s. I hardly have used it, and never have determined if I can shoot 2-3/4" shells in it. Does anyone know?

The 16 gauge never has malfunctioned, and I am still married to the same woman 30 years later.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from nc30-06 wrote 1 year 3 days ago

I first shot a 12 ga. 1100 at a skeet shoot when I was about 14 years old. Got 5 out of 5. I have never owned one yet, but I have a friend who has a left-hand 12 ga. 1100 that I am determined to own. I sure would like to find a left hand 16 ga.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Tim Platt wrote 1 year 3 days ago

I have an 1100 that was made in the early 60's that is still in use. It was originally purchased by my wife's grandfather but I have had it at least 20 years. It fits me better than any other shotgun like Ishawoo has commented, and the O ring has been replaced once. Not exactly a lot of work for over 40 years of service.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from smokey0347 wrote 1 year 3 days ago

I currently own an 870 and a Nylon 66 Apache. As Remington is now only after the almighty dollar and refuses to stand up against New York's bogus new gun laws, both of these will be sold in the very near future. I cannot and will not support any gun/parts manufacturer that will not stand up and fight for our 2nd Amendment rights. When I look at the growing list of Companies that are Relocating their manufacturing plants to other gun friendly states, I know just who I will be supporting with my business.
A prime example is Magpul FORMERLY of Colorado. It is moving it's plant and a very large portion of its employees out of Colorado. This move is going to cost the State a whole lot of lost revenue. And this isn't even including all of the out of state hunters who have pledged not to hunt in Colorado again. More lost revenue and more jobs lost due to lack of hunters needing guides and outfitters.
The more this starts happening to other states with trying to usurp our Constitutional rights, the quicker the message will get out to our legislators that we will not stand for our Rights being tossed aside just because of a few crazies. More people are killed every year by drunk drivers yet, no one is trying to ban cars.
We all need to 'stick to our guns' and say enough is enough. Get ahold of your elected officials and tell them it's time they started to obey their oath of office. You know, the one that states TO DEFEND THE CONSTITUTION.
Ok, I'll get off the soap box now.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from crm3006 wrote 1 year 2 days ago

My LH 1100 12 gauge magnum was bought sometime in late 1972 or early '73. Equipped with the 30" FC barrel, it was perfect for trap, geese and ducks. Later I managed a 20" slug barrel, and a 26" Rem-Choke barrel. I would guesstimate that the 1100 has fired in excess of 10,000 rounds. It still has the original o-ring in place. One time, it has malfunctioned, and a short trip to the gunsmith, and a little peening of an interior part, and she is still going today. They can keep all those Brownings, Berettas, and Benellis, that look like something Buck Rogers would carry, and cost an arm and a leg. Except the old Browning Auto 5.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from ITHACASXS wrote 1 year 2 days ago

In 1981, my friend and I were sighting in our shotguns for deer season. My friend who weighed maybe 140lbs soaking wet, had his 12 ga. Ted Williams pump (really a mossberg) and was grimacing and flinching while reluctantly pulling(yes pulling)the trigger. I had him shoot my like-new (just bought from a cash strapped party boy ) 1100. He had so much fun shooting it (slugs, mind you), he ran out that weekend and bought one, and then later, another for his wife. They have killed a lot of deer in very cold weather. I have two,a 12 & 20 and my children love shooting them over all my guns.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from foggbird wrote 1 year 1 day ago

First off, let me say that my 1100 was the softest shooting shotgun I ever owned. And it was the worst. One of the first times duck hunting I fell into a slough over my head. I dried and lubed that shotgun, but it never recovered. I was shooting S & W Baby Magnums which were the dirtiest shell I ever used. I had to clean that 1100 every time I used it, and it still jammed on me. I finally sold it to a guy for $100 and was glad to get rid of it.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Michigan Gunner wrote 1 year 1 day ago

I have a 1100 Mag. 12 that I bought use 1985. It came with a fixed choke 30 inch MOD 3 inch barrel. I have since bought others such as a 26 inch Skeet and a 28 inch Remchoke. It was the first gun I shot 50 straight at trap with. It was the first gun I used in South Dakota hunting pheasants. I shot a lot of skeet with it and still use it with an extended mag for three gun. I found out that you need a very good "O" ring in cold weather or it won't function well. Of course, you need to keep it clean. It seems to fit me and I shoot it well.

Hmmm.......maybe I should use it more!

MG

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from springerman3 wrote 52 weeks 21 hours ago

I bought a 28 guage 1100 a few years ago with spectacular wood. Harveted ditch parrots, quail and grouse with it and shot it well on the sporting clays course. However after two mechanical failures ( same part ) I decided to part with it. I also have an 20 gauge 1187 which has been a workhorse that has not let me down ( unles I fail to clean it properly )

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from oakwood phantom wrote 52 weeks 7 hours ago

Great film clip and gun! Ya gotta love old clips like that with the voice and background music. The credits don't say but the narrator sounds a whole lot like Hal Holbrook.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from O Garcia wrote 51 weeks 6 days ago

how about the Versa Max, how do the two compare?

0 Good Comment? | | Report

Post a Comment

from Happy Myles wrote 1 year 4 days ago

When the 1100 came out I somehow ended up with three of them, 12, 20, and 28 gauge. They were all the rage at the skeet range and in the field. Besides ammo, I carried extra 0 rings and a can of brake cleaner. I remember being critical of the grain in the forearm of the 12 gauge and the salesman in the show room without a word exchanged it with another on the shelf in seconds. Those were the days.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from deadeyedick wrote 1 year 3 days ago

I beg to differ. I would put my 1100's up against any semi-auto. I shot a field grade at ameateur trap for 9 straight years and never replaced any part of it . The only thing I ever added was a 30 inch trap barrel. With that gun I shot against all makes and models that cost many times what I paid for that 1100, and kept a .7 handicapp. I still own 3 1100s and would not trade or sell any of them. Keep it clean and I would guess it would shoot forever. I bought my first 1100 in 1969 and it is as good as the day I bought it.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from duckcreekdick wrote 1 year 4 days ago

The 1100 was a "home-run" for Remington and continues to be the standard by which other gas shotguns are compared.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from PbHead wrote 1 year 4 days ago

Thanks for the video Phil. I noticed that a few folks had hearing protection in the good old days, most did not. And in the final hunting scene, I enjoyed the "Jones Style" hat that might be making a comeback. We have come a long ways.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Bernie wrote 1 year 3 days ago

I bought a Model 1100 in 16 gauge at a hardware store in Valley City, ND in 1973 for $150. Gave it to my wife when we married in 1983. I had the 28" barrel's choke opened from full to modified. In 1985 UPS delivered a green box to our house. My wife thought it might be flowers for our anniversary. It was an improved cylinder barrel, ventilated rib, 26" in length. I said, "You can't shoot pheasant roosters with a dozen roses."

Also, I inherited an 1100 from my father--a 3" 20 gauge, probably made in the late '70s. I hardly have used it, and never have determined if I can shoot 2-3/4" shells in it. Does anyone know?

The 16 gauge never has malfunctioned, and I am still married to the same woman 30 years later.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from badsmerf wrote 1 year 4 days ago

The 1100 is the first shotgun I ever shot, and was eventually given to me by my dad (by default since I use it so much). I will never sell that gun and plan to give it to my son when he is old enough to start hunting (and beating on guns lol). I love this gun and its versatility.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Happy Myles wrote 1 year 4 days ago

Phil,
Do they indebtify the male shooters at the range one looks very familiar.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from etexan wrote 1 year 4 days ago

I remember seeing one owned by my Dad's friend from work and thinking how nice it looked. Bought my first in mid-70's for $138. As is the case in a number of similar purchases, I shoulda bought two!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Mark-1 wrote 1 year 4 days ago

Owned eight 1100's in my career. Started out shooting target clays with 1100's and I'm ending my shooting career with an 1100.

This shotgun's been around so long lots of tweaks to modify the shotgun for even better performance.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from mayoaaron wrote 1 year 4 days ago

I own one of these, it was passed down from my dad who bought it in the 70s

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from mayoaaron wrote 1 year 4 days ago

I own one of these, it was passed down from my dad who bought it in the 80s

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from philbourjaily wrote 1 year 4 days ago

Happy Myles -
I was five when the movie came out so I don't know anyone in the film. Probably Remington employees, though.There are no credits other than what you see at the beginning.

Pbhead -- I miss Jones hats! I always thought they were better looking and more practical than ballcaps.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from hunterdds wrote 1 year 4 days ago

killed my first deer and every once since with an old 1100 that my dad first bought around 1967. he had the gun drilled and tapped for a scope mount back in the day when it was unheard of to do so. I have fired thousands of rounds of bird shot and hundreds of slugs and never had problems with jamming or cycling and I have to admit I am not so good about cleaning it. I bought a new 1100 in the late 1990's. it jams, sticks and gives me all kinds of problems, just goes to show they dont make em like they used to. I take the scope off and go bird hunting or shoot trap, put it back on and chase deer. I can get two inch groups with slugs at 50 yards and hit within a six inch circle out to 120. its not going to win any accuracy competitions,but the old pumpkin lobber sure puts meat in the frezzer. I want to get a new "pimped out" slug gun, money is not an issue but I can't even think about leaving that gun in the safe when I hit the woods

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Del in KS wrote 1 year 4 days ago

My old duck hunting buddy Billy D has several Belgian Brownings but the gun he shoots is his old 1100. He loves that gun but every year I kid him about using that 1100 for a boat anchor and buying a Benelli so he'll have a real shotgun.
When I was a young fellow that was the gun I wanted but could not afford.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from ishawooa wrote 1 year 3 days ago

I have owned many Browning A-5s and 1100s over the years, some new some used. I never had to carry extra parts and tools to keep the old humpbacks running so they remain my favorites. However, I always felt that I could shoot a 1100 better than the Browning, apparently the fit was more correct.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from PbHead wrote 1 year 3 days ago

Phil, I found a blaze orange hat at the local Farm & Home store this fall. Two are on the current LL Bean web page. Get yours now!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from nc30-06 wrote 1 year 3 days ago

I first shot a 12 ga. 1100 at a skeet shoot when I was about 14 years old. Got 5 out of 5. I have never owned one yet, but I have a friend who has a left-hand 12 ga. 1100 that I am determined to own. I sure would like to find a left hand 16 ga.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Tim Platt wrote 1 year 3 days ago

I have an 1100 that was made in the early 60's that is still in use. It was originally purchased by my wife's grandfather but I have had it at least 20 years. It fits me better than any other shotgun like Ishawoo has commented, and the O ring has been replaced once. Not exactly a lot of work for over 40 years of service.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from smokey0347 wrote 1 year 3 days ago

I currently own an 870 and a Nylon 66 Apache. As Remington is now only after the almighty dollar and refuses to stand up against New York's bogus new gun laws, both of these will be sold in the very near future. I cannot and will not support any gun/parts manufacturer that will not stand up and fight for our 2nd Amendment rights. When I look at the growing list of Companies that are Relocating their manufacturing plants to other gun friendly states, I know just who I will be supporting with my business.
A prime example is Magpul FORMERLY of Colorado. It is moving it's plant and a very large portion of its employees out of Colorado. This move is going to cost the State a whole lot of lost revenue. And this isn't even including all of the out of state hunters who have pledged not to hunt in Colorado again. More lost revenue and more jobs lost due to lack of hunters needing guides and outfitters.
The more this starts happening to other states with trying to usurp our Constitutional rights, the quicker the message will get out to our legislators that we will not stand for our Rights being tossed aside just because of a few crazies. More people are killed every year by drunk drivers yet, no one is trying to ban cars.
We all need to 'stick to our guns' and say enough is enough. Get ahold of your elected officials and tell them it's time they started to obey their oath of office. You know, the one that states TO DEFEND THE CONSTITUTION.
Ok, I'll get off the soap box now.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from crm3006 wrote 1 year 2 days ago

My LH 1100 12 gauge magnum was bought sometime in late 1972 or early '73. Equipped with the 30" FC barrel, it was perfect for trap, geese and ducks. Later I managed a 20" slug barrel, and a 26" Rem-Choke barrel. I would guesstimate that the 1100 has fired in excess of 10,000 rounds. It still has the original o-ring in place. One time, it has malfunctioned, and a short trip to the gunsmith, and a little peening of an interior part, and she is still going today. They can keep all those Brownings, Berettas, and Benellis, that look like something Buck Rogers would carry, and cost an arm and a leg. Except the old Browning Auto 5.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from ITHACASXS wrote 1 year 2 days ago

In 1981, my friend and I were sighting in our shotguns for deer season. My friend who weighed maybe 140lbs soaking wet, had his 12 ga. Ted Williams pump (really a mossberg) and was grimacing and flinching while reluctantly pulling(yes pulling)the trigger. I had him shoot my like-new (just bought from a cash strapped party boy ) 1100. He had so much fun shooting it (slugs, mind you), he ran out that weekend and bought one, and then later, another for his wife. They have killed a lot of deer in very cold weather. I have two,a 12 & 20 and my children love shooting them over all my guns.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from foggbird wrote 1 year 1 day ago

First off, let me say that my 1100 was the softest shooting shotgun I ever owned. And it was the worst. One of the first times duck hunting I fell into a slough over my head. I dried and lubed that shotgun, but it never recovered. I was shooting S & W Baby Magnums which were the dirtiest shell I ever used. I had to clean that 1100 every time I used it, and it still jammed on me. I finally sold it to a guy for $100 and was glad to get rid of it.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Michigan Gunner wrote 1 year 1 day ago

I have a 1100 Mag. 12 that I bought use 1985. It came with a fixed choke 30 inch MOD 3 inch barrel. I have since bought others such as a 26 inch Skeet and a 28 inch Remchoke. It was the first gun I shot 50 straight at trap with. It was the first gun I used in South Dakota hunting pheasants. I shot a lot of skeet with it and still use it with an extended mag for three gun. I found out that you need a very good "O" ring in cold weather or it won't function well. Of course, you need to keep it clean. It seems to fit me and I shoot it well.

Hmmm.......maybe I should use it more!

MG

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from springerman3 wrote 52 weeks 21 hours ago

I bought a 28 guage 1100 a few years ago with spectacular wood. Harveted ditch parrots, quail and grouse with it and shot it well on the sporting clays course. However after two mechanical failures ( same part ) I decided to part with it. I also have an 20 gauge 1187 which has been a workhorse that has not let me down ( unles I fail to clean it properly )

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from oakwood phantom wrote 52 weeks 7 hours ago

Great film clip and gun! Ya gotta love old clips like that with the voice and background music. The credits don't say but the narrator sounds a whole lot like Hal Holbrook.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from O Garcia wrote 51 weeks 6 days ago

how about the Versa Max, how do the two compare?

0 Good Comment? | | Report

Post a Comment