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Win Shooting Stuff: Get Your Question On Gun Nuts TV

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May 20, 2013

Win Shooting Stuff: Get Your Question On Gun Nuts TV

By Phil Bourjaily

Season IV of “The Gun Nuts” begins filming this week. That is me on the set last season, shooting trap with a camera attached to my gun using electrician’s tape. This year we will have an all-new much improved gun camera (the ShotKam) and, I hope, some other improvements to the show, which is a lot of fun to do.

Once again I will be answering viewer/reader questions that is, if you have any.

Ask me your shotgun questions. This season I’ll be picking four or five and some fabulous but as yet un-named prize will go to the people whose questions I answer.

If the question can best be answered by me shooting something, that makes for much better TV than me talking, which can be boring. I have answered questions in the past about cross-dominance, what happens when you put a 20-gauge shell in a 12-gauge barrel, if there is such a thing as shot string and many other topics of earth-shaking importance. So, please ask away, and you may be the winner of some useful shooting-related widget that web editor Dave Maccar or I can scam from some willing manufacturer.

Comments (51)

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from -Bob wrote 47 weeks 21 hours ago

How 'bout this -- do those little "fins" molded into the sides of a rifled slug (a Foster slug, not a rifled slug) actually DO anything, or are they just for show? Does the slug spin at all, or do those fins just get smooshed flat on the way down the barrel?

Or -- how long does it take for the sabot-y parts to separate from a sabot slug? Does centrifugal force just whip them away, or are they along for the ride for a while?

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from WA Mtnhunter wrote 47 weeks 20 hours ago

How are double rifles "regulated" as opposed to the way a double barrel shotgun is regulated / aligned?

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Ontario Honker ... wrote 47 weeks 19 hours ago

Is there any advantage to sling swivels that actually swivel as opposed to those that are fixed?

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from Ontario Honker ... wrote 47 weeks 19 hours ago

I have seen after-market fluorescent orange/yellow 3-shot magazine plugs advertised on auction websites. Why in the world would anyone want a glo-in-the-dark shotgun plug if it's going to be completely hidden from sight inside the shotgun's magazine tube anyway? (Note: I think I know the answer for this one but I'm sure it is a question that comes to mind for most guys who have never had to change out a plug in the field.)

And speaking of plugs, which is better, the plugs with crowns at one end or those that are just straight cylinders? Why? (Any turkey hunter will know the answer but waterfowl hunters probably not).

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from tygh98 wrote 47 weeks 18 hours ago

Wow Ontario, those are good questions indeed. I have been hunting both waterfowl and turkeys for about 15 years. I have yet to ever remove the plug from any of my shotguns. Maybe you could shed a little light on the mysteries?

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from smccardell wrote 47 weeks 17 hours ago

As a kid my first gun was a .410 shotgun. I recall the disappointment in my brother-in-laws face when he realized it would not hold the 45 LC shell he was hoping it would fire. He chalked it up tot he gun being "too new". So is there an older .410 that will actually shoot a 45 LC? I also heard that the .410 could possibly fire a 45/70, any truth to this? If it can technically be done, what are the disadvantages/advantages of doing it? Thanks!

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from Ontario Honker ... wrote 47 weeks 17 hours ago

Phill, you started a thread a while back about some fools shooting dimes out of a shotgun and mentioned that flattened shot seems to provide a much wider pattern. Okay, has anyone done any experiments with magnetized steel shot? Seems to me that might provide some interesting pattern variations.

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from smccardell wrote 47 weeks 17 hours ago

In my home state of MD it is currently illegal to use buckshot to take a deer except in ONE county. The shot must be #1 or larger. I am contemplating going hunting there in the fall. Whats the maximum range for buckshot to be effective? What's the advantage of using buckshot over a slug? Thanks!

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from timvance8 wrote 47 weeks 17 hours ago

Do spreader loads produce a consistent and repeatable pattern? And which type of load performs better, flattened shot or a plastic insert in the wad?
Thanks and enjoy filming the show.

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from springerman3 wrote 47 weeks 16 hours ago

Phil,
Perhaps a segment about reloading and the benefits that come from it ( especially in todays can't find shells society )? Show the difference from loading light loads for targets and how they can work in the field vs the fast & heavy stuff the industry sells us ?
I don't remember if you have done anything on steel vs lead shot on the show ?

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from PbHead wrote 47 weeks 16 hours ago

Phil, How about demonstrating the accuracy of different slug loads in smooth bore, fully, rifled and rifled choke barrels. Use the same gun, just switch barrels and loads. You pick the distance and I will provide the aspirin for your shoulder and headache. As a token of my consideration for your well being, three shot groups might be enough since many hunters are subject to this limit. However, if you have come under the influence of Mr. Petzel, go ahead and shoot ten round groups.

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from Fruguy101 wrote 47 weeks 16 hours ago

We have all read stories about lead being in some burger that was made from a donated deer. If you were using buckshot, how many of those pellets stay in the body of a deer when shot from various ranges? Also, if a slug passes through the body of a deer, how much of the original weight of the slug is lost by passing through the deer?

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from Hookturnr wrote 47 weeks 13 hours ago

How about this...For a given clay sport, lets say sporting clays, what are the advantages and disadvantages of using a semi auto vs. an over/under or SxS? Is there a distinct performance advantage to any of these outside of felt recoil? Myself,

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from auburn_hunter wrote 47 weeks 13 hours ago

Phil -

What about selection of choke tubes for various shots? I am thinking more of sporting clays, as I shot last week with a gentleman who was shooting an O/U and traded out tubes throughout the round after seeing each show pair...and with great success, I might add. I shoot a semiauto, so I am obviously limited to one tube, which also begs the question, if you have to choose one tube for a whole round of sporting clays, which one will best benefit you?

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from springerman3 wrote 47 weeks 12 hours ago

Hookturnr: I am sure Phil will have a perspective on this that would fill a segment. Myself I use a semi-auto most of the time, mostly to reduce recoil plus I shoot it very well. I also use a s/s with my own reloads that are as soft or softer than shells I shoot in the auto and do as well with it.
auburn_hunter: Changing chokes often can be good or bad, my thoughts go with just put the gun where it belongs and the load should do its job. I shoot skeet choke 95 % of the time and change loads before switching chokes. This too would make a good segment !

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from mspl8sdcntryboy wrote 47 weeks 10 hours ago

With all the different shot sizes available, which is actually best for which game.
And a second part to that: in places where you can choose between steel and lead shot, which one is better and for what reason.

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from mspl8sdcntryboy wrote 47 weeks 10 hours ago

How do you choose the proper shotgun fit.

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from O Garcia wrote 47 weeks 9 hours ago

Why are 8-gauge and larger bores no longer being factory loaded?

Why are there few areas where turkeys are hunted with rifles? Why are turkeys being hunted with shotguns when, strictly speaking, they're on the ground and it's not wingshooting?

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from Alder Bark wrote 47 weeks 8 hours ago

Snap shooting and short barrels, is it a myth or a strategy?

I have heard many people contend that they prefer shorter shotgun barrels for heavy cover and "snap shooting". My understanding of the term is that you shoulder the gun and shoot in one motion with no real sustained lead, if you do it right the barrel comes up right in front of the bird and the bird falls.

I am sure "snap" shots can be made - just not consistently enough to warrant the title of snap shooter. I really don't think it happens nearly as often as people claim and 90% of the time there is at least a little swing through if not a lot. And many successful snap shots are just a one time fluke with imagination meeting ego.

Furthermore , longer barrels are becoming more and more popular lately, the theory being (as Im sure you know ) is to keep the barrels moving as smoothly as possible, which would be the antithesis of what a snap shooter would want.
most long barrel proponents concur that the longer barrels are not a hinderance in the grouse woods where many believe opportunities for sustained leads are few and "snap shooting" rules the day. And they actually help you make the shots you should have made anyway, and you still stand just as slim a chance at making the hail mary shots as you did when you were toting a whippy short barreled gun for the idea of quick shots in tight cover.
Would the dynamics of a short barreled gun truly compliment the snap shooter or are we all just better off with longer barrels. please excuse the generalizations.

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from Ontario Honker ... wrote 47 weeks 2 hours ago

Alder Bark: I couldn't agree with you more! I have two shotguns that I hunt with, a 3" mag 870 and a "Light Twelve" Browning A-5, both are 12 gauge. I of course use the 870 for goose hunting. In recent years I have been using the Browning for pheasant hunting. I'll be the first to admit that I am MUCH more accurate shooting pheasants with the 870 but I enjoy shooting the Browning more (taking game is less important to me than enjoying the hunting experience and watching my dogs work ... and the longer they work the more I get to watch them!). The 870 has a 30" full choke barrel and the Browning has a modified barrel that is, I believe, 26" long (never measured it). I bought the Browning in Korea in 1973 when I was in the Army. I had already been shooting the 870 since 1968. I predominantly jump shot ducks on creeks and ponds in NW Montana so I was predominantly a snap shooter. I couldn't hit ANYTHING with that Browning so I traded it to my dad for his .357 which I needed for backcountry trips with my horses. I got the shotgun back after Dad died in 1999. I shoot better with it now but still pales in comparison to the old 870 which I will still put into action on pheasants from time to time when the birds are spooky at the end of the season. I don't see any difference in the way the stocks are set up on the two guns so that doesn't seem to be the answer. For a long time I thought it might just be a matter of confidence. But I'm sure you're right ... sort of. However, I think it is barrel length that makes the difference. Or rather the weight difference caused thereby. I do believe that a heavier gun swings and follows through better, even for "snap shots." It will be interesting to see what Phil has to say about this.

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from FirstBubba wrote 47 weeks 2 hours ago

Capstick did an article on "shot size vs. pattern density". It was a subject much discussed between my dad and I. He and Capstick stood together.
"Pattern density, not shot size, kills."

What advantage does the 3.5" magnum shotgun offer over the standard 2.75" chambering and the 3" chambering? Payload or velocity (fps)?

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from Nixstyx wrote 47 weeks 14 min ago

Here's something I'm hoping you can help me with: How does velocity affect the pattern and effective range of a shell? Some manufactures, for example, offer shells that advertise higher velocities and label them "long range" loads. However, I've heard conflicting statements that low velocity is actually better for long range shots because it offers a more dense, consistent pattern as the shot moves down range (as opposed to high velocity shells, which cause some pellets to deform and fly off at odd angles). Given this confusing set of "facts" how should I go about picking a shell for long vs. short range shooting?

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from mspl8sdcntryboy wrote 46 weeks 6 days ago

We all know that for wing-shooting longer barrels make for better, smoother swings and a greater chance of hitting what you're shooting at, but is there an advantage for longer barrels for big game?

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from vestevez wrote 46 weeks 6 days ago

Can you show the difference between using lead vs non-toxic shot? Pattern density, penetration, etc etc?
Thanks!

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from rusinurbe wrote 46 weeks 6 days ago

1. Can you show how different clay targets (orange vs green) look through different colored glasses, perhaps against different backgrounds and different light conditions? (e.g., put to rest, what is the best color eye wear to shoot with in any given condition?).

2. How would you recommend a new hunter who lives in the city get started with hunting (assuming he/she knows how to shoot and has passed a hunter education test, what's the best way to get started?). Or slightly different, how do you get younger people and non-traditional hunters into the sport?

3. (slight trolling) Why do Brits hunt for upland game wearing ties and other nice clothes? Why don't Americans? Does that make the Brits better hunters?

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from Safado wrote 46 weeks 6 days ago

Phil,
My 12 gauge will not take 3.5" shells and my 20 gauge will only shoot 2.75" shells. How do you get maximum performance out of 3" and 2.75" shells? Is there a shot type or load that maximizes performance out of 2.75" and 3" chambers?

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from Ontario Honker ... wrote 46 weeks 6 days ago

Rusinrube, for the most part British upland hunters stand in a line while beaters chase the birds over them. Under those conditions the fashion show leans more towards looking like a gentleman ... since landed gentry are (and always have been) for the most part the only ones who have the resources available to them for hunting. The attire is a snobby thing for sure. In America the fashion trend seems to be for upland hunters to look like whatever techy thing is currently being promoted in Cabela's flyers. And let's face it, it's been a long time since anyone on this side of the Atlantic tried to promote looking like a gentleman in the field ... or off of it.

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from -Bob wrote 46 weeks 6 days ago

I’ve read that the barrel of the Browning Auto-5 moves rearward approximately 3” upon being fired, which operates the action.

Really?

I believe I’d like to see some slo-mo of that alleged event.

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from Capt Zooom wrote 46 weeks 6 days ago

Sir,

Why is it we are taught a proper sight picture with pistols and rifles, and told to watch the target when shotgunning? I would think a proper sight picture would be required.

Thanks for your answer.

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from Alder Bark wrote 46 weeks 6 days ago

Ontario Honker: Thanks!

I think the shot cam and some expert shooting would be a great way to sort this all out... maybe once and for all? Nahhhhh.
Perhaps there is a way to prove we are are making shots despite shorter barrels not, because of the them - or vice versa.

give most people just one gun to work with and enough practice and I am sure they could become somewhat proficient with any barrel length, even with the stubby 24" barrels of a 20 gauge browning upland special, but would they be that much better with something that possessed longer barrels and more weight up front that was designed to move?

after all, when was the last time you saw a six pound 26" or less gun being used in sporting clay competition. if short barrels were conducive to good shooting certainly we would be seeing more of them and their resale value wouldn't drop as much after purchase.

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from 99explorer wrote 46 weeks 6 days ago

Is tracer shot still available, and is it safe to use?

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from mkukson wrote 46 weeks 6 days ago

I've heard of people taking shot out of a 4 10 shotgun shell, loading it, and then putting an arrow with a field tip down the barrel of the shotgun and then shooting it. I was wondering if it was possible, accurate, safe, or even legal to use on game? I think it would be interesting to test!

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from Ontario Honker ... wrote 46 weeks 6 days ago

Tygh: in case you happen to live somewhere where the Gun Nuts program is not available (like me), I'll go ahead and give you the answers to the magazine plug questions (at least I believe these are the answers).

First, the crowned vs straight plugs. Crowned plugs are held in place at the top of the magazine spring while straight plugs (often just a piece of doweling - I have even used a Bic pen in a pinch) slide up and down inside the magazine banging on caps at both ends. This creates noise that might not be desirable for still hunters (turkey and deer) but of no big concern to waterfowl hunters. Because the crown type plug is held in place at the top of the magazine it cannot slide around and make noise.

For those of us who are constantly removing or replacing the plug or want to make the effort to clean the inside of the magazine tube regularly, it's necessary to pry out the pressure fit spring retainer at the top of the tube to remove the spring and follower. Many of us don't bother replacing it so the plug can be switched out and/or tube cleaned a lot easier. However, this can create a problem if one is not careful. The cap holding the barrel to the magazine tube now has the full pressure of the spring behind it. When the cap is unscrewed to remove the barrel or get rid of the plug, sproing! ... both spring and plug (and maybe even the magazine cap!) can be launched into space! It's a lot easer to find them again if the plug is a bright color (in fact I lost the original wooden plug for my 870 this way).

One advantage to straight plugs is that they can usually be removed or replaced through the hole in the center of the spring retaining cap. That way there's no risk of a “sproing” accident and having to chase down the spring and/or plug. However, I prefer to get rid of the magazine spring retainer cap altogether and just use care unscrewing the magazine end cap. The inside of the magazine is notorious for accumulating moisture so I'll usually want to remove the spring, plug, and follower every time I disassemble and clean the gun anyway. Prying out the spring retaining cap time and again for cleaning without having it fly off into space with the spring and plug is a challenge. I finally lost mine for my 870 years ago and just never bothered replacing it (so I could just lose it again?).

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from dws wrote 46 weeks 6 days ago

How fast could YOU fire 8 rounds accurately out of a 12ga pump shotgun?

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from J.B.H wrote 46 weeks 5 days ago

What is the differance between Japanese made barrels or Belgian made barrels for the browning A-5?

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from macmadman wrote 46 weeks 5 days ago

I have been thinking about getting a semi-auto 20 gauge shotgun for home defense. The reason for thinking 20 gauge is that my wife is small and has no experience with firearms. Do you think that if she gets training, which she is willing to do, a 20 gauge will make a suitable home defense shotgun? Or should I go with 12 gauge and and risk her not being able to handle the recoil?

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from Half-of-two wrote 46 weeks 5 days ago

I got into reloading my own 12g shells about a year ago. Typically, there is no shortage of hulls at the range I shoot at, so I usually pick up the hulls the guys around me discard and chuck my twice-used ones. My question is this...is there a "safe" number of times a hull can be reloaded? Obviously, primers, shot & powder are all going to play a role, so I'm looking for a ball-park answer. Is it more up to my own personal discretion? I got into reloading as a way to save money (the quiet time in my basement doesn't hurt, either!) but am I wasting money if I toss a hull after it's been shot twice? What if it has a small crack in it...is it still safe to shoot? Any recommendations as to which hulls tend to hold up better and last longer?

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from Greeley7 wrote 46 weeks 5 days ago

I have a friend who's right handed, but left eye dominant. He can shoot a rifle prone with either hand. He's looking to take up trap shooting. Would you recommend shooting left handed, or right handed and work on his vision?

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from tygh98 wrote 46 weeks 5 days ago

Hey Ontario,

Thanks for the reply. I will be checking out my magazines tubes for moisture damage. And one more reason to pull out the guns.

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from davycrockettfv wrote 46 weeks 5 days ago

How much of a barrel obstruction is needed to negatively affect shot pattern at 30 yards?

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from OMuilleoir wrote 46 weeks 5 days ago

For the average shotgunner: do shotwad arresting chokes really work?

Perhaps you can demonstrate the effective range on a static target with and without a shotwad arresting choke in use.

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from Ontario Honker ... wrote 46 weeks 5 days ago

Half-of-two: I suspect you are too young to remember roll crimped shells? "In the old days" many shells, especially the early 3" shells, were roll crimped rather than star crimped. A roll crimp simply had a thin paper wad placed ON TOP of the shot column and then a bit of the top edge of the hull rolled down to this paper cap to hold it in place and seal the shell (many early 3" shells used 2.75" star crimp length hulls that were roll crimped instead). Search on line and I'm sure you'll find some collectible examples to view. I in fact have an old roll crimp hand loading tool for paper shells that probably dates to the 1930s. Anyway, roll crimp shells simply blew away the shell cap so you really don't have anything to worry about if your star crimp hulls have a crack in the crimp end and come apart when they're fired. Shoot a crimp cracked hull till a piece blows out of the crimp. No worries. I have been reloading since the 1970s and do it all the time. But only if the crack is just within the crimp end. And keep an eye on the brass end. If a hull develops cracks there definitely throw it away! Also, if you happen to notice that a new primer slides in a bit too easily, tap the outside edge of shell on the table and make sure primer is going to stay put. Even if it does stay put maybe mark that one for discard after firing. Depending on the make of the shell I can get up to four and five reloads. Remington and Peters seem to hold up the best for me. Winchesters are pretty good. Hi-velocity Federals are the worst (but their Black Cloud hulls APPEAR to be a bit sturdier). A small piece often blows out of Federal factory loads when their fired and as often as not the crimp end cracks during the first reload (which is no biggy as long as the shell will hold its shot - may not be pretty but it works). Kent FastSteel hulls are only slightly better than Federals.

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from DeanTX wrote 46 weeks 5 days ago

I'd like to know more about how wind affects shotgun patterns. Head winds, tail winds, cross winds. How does the wind affect the shot at different yardages? Does shot size and velocity matter? You can clearly see how wind affects clay targets, but how much is the pattern distorted by a strong wind? Thank you for the tips and advice!

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from Ontario Honker ... wrote 46 weeks 5 days ago

Good question, Dean. It certainly seems to me that wind affects steel shot more than it does lead. I'd also like to see some demonstrations clarifying whether or not this is the case.

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from Tim Platt wrote 46 weeks 3 days ago

Is 'rasslin fake? I couldn't resist, got my mag yesterday...

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from ishawooa wrote 46 weeks 2 days ago

Does a ventilated rib offer any real advantage over a plain barrel for fast upland shooting?

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from WRF3 wrote 46 weeks 2 days ago

Why has the 16 gauge "disappeared", What are the advantages/disadvantages over a 12g and 20g? The sweet 16 was a perfect mix between the two, why is there no interest. (and/or shells made)
thanks

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from Ryan Plourde wrote 46 weeks 1 day ago

I have just started turkey hunting and I was wondering which sight is better for turkey hunting? A beaded sight or a reflex/red dot sight?

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from ishawooa wrote 46 weeks 10 hours ago

"Is rasslin' fake" reminded me to ask if you shoot at a goose that is very far away and miss, will it strain your shotgun barrel? LOL

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from cb bob wrote 46 weeks 2 hours ago

Phil,
Can you please show the difference in the size of the shot pattern in 12ga., 20ga., 28ga., and .410 at a range of 20 yards. Thanks for your help.

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from Dallas A. McWhorter wrote 43 weeks 1 day ago

What type of shotgun is best for a small frame person?

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Post a Comment

from -Bob wrote 47 weeks 21 hours ago

How 'bout this -- do those little "fins" molded into the sides of a rifled slug (a Foster slug, not a rifled slug) actually DO anything, or are they just for show? Does the slug spin at all, or do those fins just get smooshed flat on the way down the barrel?

Or -- how long does it take for the sabot-y parts to separate from a sabot slug? Does centrifugal force just whip them away, or are they along for the ride for a while?

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from WA Mtnhunter wrote 47 weeks 20 hours ago

How are double rifles "regulated" as opposed to the way a double barrel shotgun is regulated / aligned?

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from auburn_hunter wrote 47 weeks 13 hours ago

Phil -

What about selection of choke tubes for various shots? I am thinking more of sporting clays, as I shot last week with a gentleman who was shooting an O/U and traded out tubes throughout the round after seeing each show pair...and with great success, I might add. I shoot a semiauto, so I am obviously limited to one tube, which also begs the question, if you have to choose one tube for a whole round of sporting clays, which one will best benefit you?

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from mkukson wrote 46 weeks 6 days ago

I've heard of people taking shot out of a 4 10 shotgun shell, loading it, and then putting an arrow with a field tip down the barrel of the shotgun and then shooting it. I was wondering if it was possible, accurate, safe, or even legal to use on game? I think it would be interesting to test!

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from dws wrote 46 weeks 6 days ago

How fast could YOU fire 8 rounds accurately out of a 12ga pump shotgun?

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Dallas A. McWhorter wrote 43 weeks 1 day ago

What type of shotgun is best for a small frame person?

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Ontario Honker ... wrote 47 weeks 19 hours ago

Is there any advantage to sling swivels that actually swivel as opposed to those that are fixed?

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from Ontario Honker ... wrote 47 weeks 19 hours ago

I have seen after-market fluorescent orange/yellow 3-shot magazine plugs advertised on auction websites. Why in the world would anyone want a glo-in-the-dark shotgun plug if it's going to be completely hidden from sight inside the shotgun's magazine tube anyway? (Note: I think I know the answer for this one but I'm sure it is a question that comes to mind for most guys who have never had to change out a plug in the field.)

And speaking of plugs, which is better, the plugs with crowns at one end or those that are just straight cylinders? Why? (Any turkey hunter will know the answer but waterfowl hunters probably not).

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from tygh98 wrote 47 weeks 18 hours ago

Wow Ontario, those are good questions indeed. I have been hunting both waterfowl and turkeys for about 15 years. I have yet to ever remove the plug from any of my shotguns. Maybe you could shed a little light on the mysteries?

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from smccardell wrote 47 weeks 17 hours ago

As a kid my first gun was a .410 shotgun. I recall the disappointment in my brother-in-laws face when he realized it would not hold the 45 LC shell he was hoping it would fire. He chalked it up tot he gun being "too new". So is there an older .410 that will actually shoot a 45 LC? I also heard that the .410 could possibly fire a 45/70, any truth to this? If it can technically be done, what are the disadvantages/advantages of doing it? Thanks!

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from Ontario Honker ... wrote 47 weeks 17 hours ago

Phill, you started a thread a while back about some fools shooting dimes out of a shotgun and mentioned that flattened shot seems to provide a much wider pattern. Okay, has anyone done any experiments with magnetized steel shot? Seems to me that might provide some interesting pattern variations.

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from smccardell wrote 47 weeks 17 hours ago

In my home state of MD it is currently illegal to use buckshot to take a deer except in ONE county. The shot must be #1 or larger. I am contemplating going hunting there in the fall. Whats the maximum range for buckshot to be effective? What's the advantage of using buckshot over a slug? Thanks!

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from timvance8 wrote 47 weeks 17 hours ago

Do spreader loads produce a consistent and repeatable pattern? And which type of load performs better, flattened shot or a plastic insert in the wad?
Thanks and enjoy filming the show.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from springerman3 wrote 47 weeks 16 hours ago

Phil,
Perhaps a segment about reloading and the benefits that come from it ( especially in todays can't find shells society )? Show the difference from loading light loads for targets and how they can work in the field vs the fast & heavy stuff the industry sells us ?
I don't remember if you have done anything on steel vs lead shot on the show ?

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from PbHead wrote 47 weeks 16 hours ago

Phil, How about demonstrating the accuracy of different slug loads in smooth bore, fully, rifled and rifled choke barrels. Use the same gun, just switch barrels and loads. You pick the distance and I will provide the aspirin for your shoulder and headache. As a token of my consideration for your well being, three shot groups might be enough since many hunters are subject to this limit. However, if you have come under the influence of Mr. Petzel, go ahead and shoot ten round groups.

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from Fruguy101 wrote 47 weeks 16 hours ago

We have all read stories about lead being in some burger that was made from a donated deer. If you were using buckshot, how many of those pellets stay in the body of a deer when shot from various ranges? Also, if a slug passes through the body of a deer, how much of the original weight of the slug is lost by passing through the deer?

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from Hookturnr wrote 47 weeks 13 hours ago

How about this...For a given clay sport, lets say sporting clays, what are the advantages and disadvantages of using a semi auto vs. an over/under or SxS? Is there a distinct performance advantage to any of these outside of felt recoil? Myself,

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from springerman3 wrote 47 weeks 12 hours ago

Hookturnr: I am sure Phil will have a perspective on this that would fill a segment. Myself I use a semi-auto most of the time, mostly to reduce recoil plus I shoot it very well. I also use a s/s with my own reloads that are as soft or softer than shells I shoot in the auto and do as well with it.
auburn_hunter: Changing chokes often can be good or bad, my thoughts go with just put the gun where it belongs and the load should do its job. I shoot skeet choke 95 % of the time and change loads before switching chokes. This too would make a good segment !

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from mspl8sdcntryboy wrote 47 weeks 10 hours ago

With all the different shot sizes available, which is actually best for which game.
And a second part to that: in places where you can choose between steel and lead shot, which one is better and for what reason.

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from mspl8sdcntryboy wrote 47 weeks 10 hours ago

How do you choose the proper shotgun fit.

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from O Garcia wrote 47 weeks 9 hours ago

Why are 8-gauge and larger bores no longer being factory loaded?

Why are there few areas where turkeys are hunted with rifles? Why are turkeys being hunted with shotguns when, strictly speaking, they're on the ground and it's not wingshooting?

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from Alder Bark wrote 47 weeks 8 hours ago

Snap shooting and short barrels, is it a myth or a strategy?

I have heard many people contend that they prefer shorter shotgun barrels for heavy cover and "snap shooting". My understanding of the term is that you shoulder the gun and shoot in one motion with no real sustained lead, if you do it right the barrel comes up right in front of the bird and the bird falls.

I am sure "snap" shots can be made - just not consistently enough to warrant the title of snap shooter. I really don't think it happens nearly as often as people claim and 90% of the time there is at least a little swing through if not a lot. And many successful snap shots are just a one time fluke with imagination meeting ego.

Furthermore , longer barrels are becoming more and more popular lately, the theory being (as Im sure you know ) is to keep the barrels moving as smoothly as possible, which would be the antithesis of what a snap shooter would want.
most long barrel proponents concur that the longer barrels are not a hinderance in the grouse woods where many believe opportunities for sustained leads are few and "snap shooting" rules the day. And they actually help you make the shots you should have made anyway, and you still stand just as slim a chance at making the hail mary shots as you did when you were toting a whippy short barreled gun for the idea of quick shots in tight cover.
Would the dynamics of a short barreled gun truly compliment the snap shooter or are we all just better off with longer barrels. please excuse the generalizations.

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from Ontario Honker ... wrote 47 weeks 2 hours ago

Alder Bark: I couldn't agree with you more! I have two shotguns that I hunt with, a 3" mag 870 and a "Light Twelve" Browning A-5, both are 12 gauge. I of course use the 870 for goose hunting. In recent years I have been using the Browning for pheasant hunting. I'll be the first to admit that I am MUCH more accurate shooting pheasants with the 870 but I enjoy shooting the Browning more (taking game is less important to me than enjoying the hunting experience and watching my dogs work ... and the longer they work the more I get to watch them!). The 870 has a 30" full choke barrel and the Browning has a modified barrel that is, I believe, 26" long (never measured it). I bought the Browning in Korea in 1973 when I was in the Army. I had already been shooting the 870 since 1968. I predominantly jump shot ducks on creeks and ponds in NW Montana so I was predominantly a snap shooter. I couldn't hit ANYTHING with that Browning so I traded it to my dad for his .357 which I needed for backcountry trips with my horses. I got the shotgun back after Dad died in 1999. I shoot better with it now but still pales in comparison to the old 870 which I will still put into action on pheasants from time to time when the birds are spooky at the end of the season. I don't see any difference in the way the stocks are set up on the two guns so that doesn't seem to be the answer. For a long time I thought it might just be a matter of confidence. But I'm sure you're right ... sort of. However, I think it is barrel length that makes the difference. Or rather the weight difference caused thereby. I do believe that a heavier gun swings and follows through better, even for "snap shots." It will be interesting to see what Phil has to say about this.

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from FirstBubba wrote 47 weeks 2 hours ago

Capstick did an article on "shot size vs. pattern density". It was a subject much discussed between my dad and I. He and Capstick stood together.
"Pattern density, not shot size, kills."

What advantage does the 3.5" magnum shotgun offer over the standard 2.75" chambering and the 3" chambering? Payload or velocity (fps)?

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from Nixstyx wrote 47 weeks 14 min ago

Here's something I'm hoping you can help me with: How does velocity affect the pattern and effective range of a shell? Some manufactures, for example, offer shells that advertise higher velocities and label them "long range" loads. However, I've heard conflicting statements that low velocity is actually better for long range shots because it offers a more dense, consistent pattern as the shot moves down range (as opposed to high velocity shells, which cause some pellets to deform and fly off at odd angles). Given this confusing set of "facts" how should I go about picking a shell for long vs. short range shooting?

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from mspl8sdcntryboy wrote 46 weeks 6 days ago

We all know that for wing-shooting longer barrels make for better, smoother swings and a greater chance of hitting what you're shooting at, but is there an advantage for longer barrels for big game?

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from vestevez wrote 46 weeks 6 days ago

Can you show the difference between using lead vs non-toxic shot? Pattern density, penetration, etc etc?
Thanks!

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from rusinurbe wrote 46 weeks 6 days ago

1. Can you show how different clay targets (orange vs green) look through different colored glasses, perhaps against different backgrounds and different light conditions? (e.g., put to rest, what is the best color eye wear to shoot with in any given condition?).

2. How would you recommend a new hunter who lives in the city get started with hunting (assuming he/she knows how to shoot and has passed a hunter education test, what's the best way to get started?). Or slightly different, how do you get younger people and non-traditional hunters into the sport?

3. (slight trolling) Why do Brits hunt for upland game wearing ties and other nice clothes? Why don't Americans? Does that make the Brits better hunters?

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from Safado wrote 46 weeks 6 days ago

Phil,
My 12 gauge will not take 3.5" shells and my 20 gauge will only shoot 2.75" shells. How do you get maximum performance out of 3" and 2.75" shells? Is there a shot type or load that maximizes performance out of 2.75" and 3" chambers?

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from Ontario Honker ... wrote 46 weeks 6 days ago

Rusinrube, for the most part British upland hunters stand in a line while beaters chase the birds over them. Under those conditions the fashion show leans more towards looking like a gentleman ... since landed gentry are (and always have been) for the most part the only ones who have the resources available to them for hunting. The attire is a snobby thing for sure. In America the fashion trend seems to be for upland hunters to look like whatever techy thing is currently being promoted in Cabela's flyers. And let's face it, it's been a long time since anyone on this side of the Atlantic tried to promote looking like a gentleman in the field ... or off of it.

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from -Bob wrote 46 weeks 6 days ago

I’ve read that the barrel of the Browning Auto-5 moves rearward approximately 3” upon being fired, which operates the action.

Really?

I believe I’d like to see some slo-mo of that alleged event.

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from Capt Zooom wrote 46 weeks 6 days ago

Sir,

Why is it we are taught a proper sight picture with pistols and rifles, and told to watch the target when shotgunning? I would think a proper sight picture would be required.

Thanks for your answer.

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from Alder Bark wrote 46 weeks 6 days ago

Ontario Honker: Thanks!

I think the shot cam and some expert shooting would be a great way to sort this all out... maybe once and for all? Nahhhhh.
Perhaps there is a way to prove we are are making shots despite shorter barrels not, because of the them - or vice versa.

give most people just one gun to work with and enough practice and I am sure they could become somewhat proficient with any barrel length, even with the stubby 24" barrels of a 20 gauge browning upland special, but would they be that much better with something that possessed longer barrels and more weight up front that was designed to move?

after all, when was the last time you saw a six pound 26" or less gun being used in sporting clay competition. if short barrels were conducive to good shooting certainly we would be seeing more of them and their resale value wouldn't drop as much after purchase.

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from 99explorer wrote 46 weeks 6 days ago

Is tracer shot still available, and is it safe to use?

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from Ontario Honker ... wrote 46 weeks 6 days ago

Tygh: in case you happen to live somewhere where the Gun Nuts program is not available (like me), I'll go ahead and give you the answers to the magazine plug questions (at least I believe these are the answers).

First, the crowned vs straight plugs. Crowned plugs are held in place at the top of the magazine spring while straight plugs (often just a piece of doweling - I have even used a Bic pen in a pinch) slide up and down inside the magazine banging on caps at both ends. This creates noise that might not be desirable for still hunters (turkey and deer) but of no big concern to waterfowl hunters. Because the crown type plug is held in place at the top of the magazine it cannot slide around and make noise.

For those of us who are constantly removing or replacing the plug or want to make the effort to clean the inside of the magazine tube regularly, it's necessary to pry out the pressure fit spring retainer at the top of the tube to remove the spring and follower. Many of us don't bother replacing it so the plug can be switched out and/or tube cleaned a lot easier. However, this can create a problem if one is not careful. The cap holding the barrel to the magazine tube now has the full pressure of the spring behind it. When the cap is unscrewed to remove the barrel or get rid of the plug, sproing! ... both spring and plug (and maybe even the magazine cap!) can be launched into space! It's a lot easer to find them again if the plug is a bright color (in fact I lost the original wooden plug for my 870 this way).

One advantage to straight plugs is that they can usually be removed or replaced through the hole in the center of the spring retaining cap. That way there's no risk of a “sproing” accident and having to chase down the spring and/or plug. However, I prefer to get rid of the magazine spring retainer cap altogether and just use care unscrewing the magazine end cap. The inside of the magazine is notorious for accumulating moisture so I'll usually want to remove the spring, plug, and follower every time I disassemble and clean the gun anyway. Prying out the spring retaining cap time and again for cleaning without having it fly off into space with the spring and plug is a challenge. I finally lost mine for my 870 years ago and just never bothered replacing it (so I could just lose it again?).

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from J.B.H wrote 46 weeks 5 days ago

What is the differance between Japanese made barrels or Belgian made barrels for the browning A-5?

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from macmadman wrote 46 weeks 5 days ago

I have been thinking about getting a semi-auto 20 gauge shotgun for home defense. The reason for thinking 20 gauge is that my wife is small and has no experience with firearms. Do you think that if she gets training, which she is willing to do, a 20 gauge will make a suitable home defense shotgun? Or should I go with 12 gauge and and risk her not being able to handle the recoil?

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from Half-of-two wrote 46 weeks 5 days ago

I got into reloading my own 12g shells about a year ago. Typically, there is no shortage of hulls at the range I shoot at, so I usually pick up the hulls the guys around me discard and chuck my twice-used ones. My question is this...is there a "safe" number of times a hull can be reloaded? Obviously, primers, shot & powder are all going to play a role, so I'm looking for a ball-park answer. Is it more up to my own personal discretion? I got into reloading as a way to save money (the quiet time in my basement doesn't hurt, either!) but am I wasting money if I toss a hull after it's been shot twice? What if it has a small crack in it...is it still safe to shoot? Any recommendations as to which hulls tend to hold up better and last longer?

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from Greeley7 wrote 46 weeks 5 days ago

I have a friend who's right handed, but left eye dominant. He can shoot a rifle prone with either hand. He's looking to take up trap shooting. Would you recommend shooting left handed, or right handed and work on his vision?

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from tygh98 wrote 46 weeks 5 days ago

Hey Ontario,

Thanks for the reply. I will be checking out my magazines tubes for moisture damage. And one more reason to pull out the guns.

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from davycrockettfv wrote 46 weeks 5 days ago

How much of a barrel obstruction is needed to negatively affect shot pattern at 30 yards?

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from OMuilleoir wrote 46 weeks 5 days ago

For the average shotgunner: do shotwad arresting chokes really work?

Perhaps you can demonstrate the effective range on a static target with and without a shotwad arresting choke in use.

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from Ontario Honker ... wrote 46 weeks 5 days ago

Half-of-two: I suspect you are too young to remember roll crimped shells? "In the old days" many shells, especially the early 3" shells, were roll crimped rather than star crimped. A roll crimp simply had a thin paper wad placed ON TOP of the shot column and then a bit of the top edge of the hull rolled down to this paper cap to hold it in place and seal the shell (many early 3" shells used 2.75" star crimp length hulls that were roll crimped instead). Search on line and I'm sure you'll find some collectible examples to view. I in fact have an old roll crimp hand loading tool for paper shells that probably dates to the 1930s. Anyway, roll crimp shells simply blew away the shell cap so you really don't have anything to worry about if your star crimp hulls have a crack in the crimp end and come apart when they're fired. Shoot a crimp cracked hull till a piece blows out of the crimp. No worries. I have been reloading since the 1970s and do it all the time. But only if the crack is just within the crimp end. And keep an eye on the brass end. If a hull develops cracks there definitely throw it away! Also, if you happen to notice that a new primer slides in a bit too easily, tap the outside edge of shell on the table and make sure primer is going to stay put. Even if it does stay put maybe mark that one for discard after firing. Depending on the make of the shell I can get up to four and five reloads. Remington and Peters seem to hold up the best for me. Winchesters are pretty good. Hi-velocity Federals are the worst (but their Black Cloud hulls APPEAR to be a bit sturdier). A small piece often blows out of Federal factory loads when their fired and as often as not the crimp end cracks during the first reload (which is no biggy as long as the shell will hold its shot - may not be pretty but it works). Kent FastSteel hulls are only slightly better than Federals.

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from DeanTX wrote 46 weeks 5 days ago

I'd like to know more about how wind affects shotgun patterns. Head winds, tail winds, cross winds. How does the wind affect the shot at different yardages? Does shot size and velocity matter? You can clearly see how wind affects clay targets, but how much is the pattern distorted by a strong wind? Thank you for the tips and advice!

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from Ontario Honker ... wrote 46 weeks 5 days ago

Good question, Dean. It certainly seems to me that wind affects steel shot more than it does lead. I'd also like to see some demonstrations clarifying whether or not this is the case.

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from Tim Platt wrote 46 weeks 3 days ago

Is 'rasslin fake? I couldn't resist, got my mag yesterday...

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from ishawooa wrote 46 weeks 2 days ago

Does a ventilated rib offer any real advantage over a plain barrel for fast upland shooting?

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from WRF3 wrote 46 weeks 2 days ago

Why has the 16 gauge "disappeared", What are the advantages/disadvantages over a 12g and 20g? The sweet 16 was a perfect mix between the two, why is there no interest. (and/or shells made)
thanks

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from Ryan Plourde wrote 46 weeks 1 day ago

I have just started turkey hunting and I was wondering which sight is better for turkey hunting? A beaded sight or a reflex/red dot sight?

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from ishawooa wrote 46 weeks 10 hours ago

"Is rasslin' fake" reminded me to ask if you shoot at a goose that is very far away and miss, will it strain your shotgun barrel? LOL

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from cb bob wrote 46 weeks 2 hours ago

Phil,
Can you please show the difference in the size of the shot pattern in 12ga., 20ga., 28ga., and .410 at a range of 20 yards. Thanks for your help.

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