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Angled Bases: Get More Range From Your Favorite Scope

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June 18, 2013

Angled Bases: Get More Range From Your Favorite Scope

By David E. Petzal

What with long range shooting being all the rage, some riflemen are discovering that their scopes, which had enough elevation for distances like 300 yards, can’t get the point of impact high enough to shoot at twice that distance, or farther. This leaves them no choice but to spend lots and lots of money on a scope with mil dots or a lot more latitude of adjustment.

There’s another way. Ken Farrell Industries makes Picatinny rails that are angled to give scopes vertical reach in bushel baskets. Farrell rails are angled downward from rear to front. He machines them in increments from 0 minutes of angle (dead flat) to 40 minutes of angle, with 10-, 15-, 20-, and 30-minutes of angle bases in between. When you mount your scope, it’s pointing down at the objective end, which forces you to raise it higher, which puts your reticle higher without touching a dial. It’s simplicity itself. You want to shoot at 1,000 yards? Ken Farrell will get you there.

The bases are CNC-machined in either steel or aluminum. I’ve used the blued steel ones, and can tell you that they’re quite heavy and prone to rust. They’re also expensive. But they’re also about as precise-fitting and as strong as anything I know of, and they come in enough variety to make anyone happy. For the Remington Model 700 alone there are close to 50 variations. Farrell even machines a groove into the underside of the base so that you can slather on epoxy and get a virtually perfect fit. His rings are just as strong and just as precisely made.

I’ve dealt with the Farrell folks on the phone and found them to be extremely helpful. If you’re in doubt as to which angle you need in your base, give them a call and they can steer you in the right direction. Kenfarrell.com.

Comments (4)

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from johnmn wrote 44 weeks 1 day ago

With a 30 degree angle, it's possible that won't have enough adjustment range to get "down" to a 100 yard zero, right? So could this type of mount make your gun into a dedicated long range rig? You'd potentially have to "hold under" on a shorter shot?

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from davidpetzal wrote 44 weeks 1 day ago

My guess is that very few people who use angled bases do a lot of shooting at 30 yards. If you want to keep your close shots, get a 10 degree base; it will give you a lot of boost, but not cost you the close stuff.

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from O Garcia wrote 44 weeks 1 day ago

another trickle-down from military long range shooting, especially since many sniper rifles at the beginning of the GWOT were in .308. while being called to make hits out to 1,000 yards and even beyond. Sometimes even the top dollar scopes (Schmidt & Bender, US Optics, Nightforce) ran out of adjustments.

But even a .338 Lapua or .50BMG can use the extra clicks afforded by these angled bases.

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from Morgie wrote 44 weeks 16 hours ago

As a terribly literal person, I was stumped until I went to the vendor's website. I think you have confused degrees with minutes of angle.

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from johnmn wrote 44 weeks 1 day ago

With a 30 degree angle, it's possible that won't have enough adjustment range to get "down" to a 100 yard zero, right? So could this type of mount make your gun into a dedicated long range rig? You'd potentially have to "hold under" on a shorter shot?

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from davidpetzal wrote 44 weeks 1 day ago

My guess is that very few people who use angled bases do a lot of shooting at 30 yards. If you want to keep your close shots, get a 10 degree base; it will give you a lot of boost, but not cost you the close stuff.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from O Garcia wrote 44 weeks 1 day ago

another trickle-down from military long range shooting, especially since many sniper rifles at the beginning of the GWOT were in .308. while being called to make hits out to 1,000 yards and even beyond. Sometimes even the top dollar scopes (Schmidt & Bender, US Optics, Nightforce) ran out of adjustments.

But even a .338 Lapua or .50BMG can use the extra clicks afforded by these angled bases.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Morgie wrote 44 weeks 16 hours ago

As a terribly literal person, I was stumped until I went to the vendor's website. I think you have confused degrees with minutes of angle.

0 Good Comment? | | Report

Post a Comment

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