Please Sign In

Please enter a valid username and password
  • Log in with Facebook
» Not a member? Take a moment to register
» Forgot Username or Password

Why Register?
Signing up could earn you gear (click here to learn how)! It also keeps offensive content off our site.

Camp Knives: Big Blades For Heavy-Duty Cutting

Recent Comments

Categories

Recent Posts

Archives

Syndicate

Google Reader or Homepage
Add to My Yahoo!
Add to My AOL

The Gun Nuts
in your Inbox

Enter your email address to get our new post everyday.

November 04, 2013

Camp Knives: Big Blades For Heavy-Duty Cutting

By David E. Petzal

“’At’s not a knoife…’at’s a knoife.” —Mick “Crocodile” Dundee, brandishing a camp knife at a terrified and out-cutlered mugger.

The definition of a camp knife is a big, heavy knife that can do most of what a hatchet can do and much of what a knife can do. The concept is not new. Mountain men carried heavy butcher knives (and skinners, and patch knives), which would qualify nicely as camp knives. In 1849, the Ames Manufacturing Company in Massachusetts manufactured a Rifleman’s Knife for American soldiers, and today we’d call it a camp knife. In World War II, the Marine Corps issued a Hospital Corpman’s Knife to medical personnel, and a Bowie knife made by Western Cutlery, the W49, to some of its Raider units. (This is the knife that Robert Redford carries in Jeremiah Johnson.) Both would qualify as camp knives, and both are very useful.

In all likelihood, “camp knife” became an official term when the late, great Bill Moran forged his own versions, and the writer Ken Warner picked up on the term and gave it to the rest of us.

In order to be useful, a camp knife can be neither small nor light. About the shortest useful blade length is 8 inches, although 9 is better, and I would not turn away a 10-incher. The blades should be broad and heavy—1/4-inch stock makes a good thick blade. You can chop with them, butcher with them, whittle, perform emergency amputations, take the head off a zombie, or settle those annoying disputes that come up in camp in a satisfyingly emphatic manner.

The camp knife shown here is a prime example of the breed, and is from Lamont Coombs, of whom I wrote this summer. What Mr. Coombs whomped up has a 90-inch 9-inch drop-point blade of D2 steel, bronze hardware, drop-dead gorgeous ironwood for the handle slabs and a substantial weight of 1 ½ pounds. It’s sharp as a razor, and almost too pretty to use, but there’s not much you can do to damage it. If you need heavy-duty cutting done with a minimum of effort, here is your huckleberry.

There are a number of factories that turn out very good camp knives (mostly on the tactical side), but the best one, in a walk, that I have ever used is the Jerry Hossom Forester knife made by Spyderco. It is a superlative knife, but now discontinued, although Spyderco has some for sale. The Forester has a 9” blade, a handle that is an ergonomic marvel, and a great sheath. If you can grab one you have a real jewel.

If there’s one drawback to camp knives, it’s that they’re damned annoying to carry on your belt—too long and too heavy, and perpetually in the way. Tote yours in a back or fanny pack, however, and all will be well.

The camp knife is not a tool you have to have, but it’s been around for a very long time, and can do a great deal that a standard-size knife can’t, which is why people still make them and use them.

Comments (29)

Top Rated
All Comments
from bluegrass45 wrote 23 weeks 1 day ago

This guy's knives are beautiful, and that camp knife is elegant.

But.....90 inch? Eek.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from jcarlin wrote 23 weeks 1 day ago

I have a KaBar Camp Knife (possibly discontinued and replaced with the short cutlass) that I've owned for the past 6 years or so and currently lives next to the fireplace where just yesterday I was using it and a baton to break a piece of cordwood down to kindling. It's all around useful and at that task is a not too distant second from a hatchet.
I happen to really like this blade. It's proven to be tough, it holds it's edge fairly well even under the kind of abuse described, it's beg bellied forward weight design makes a good chopper.
In the grand scheme of things that I've put it to use doing it's too light to be a good axe, too short to be a good machete and too large to be a good game cleaner. But for a tool that weighs about a tenth of the combined cutlery listed above, it'll do the job when the others aren't handy, just with a bit more effort (and in the case of use as a machete, you'll appreciate having work gloves even more). I look at it as a fairly heavy general utility tool. For less than 2 pounds it gives you a lot of options. It's the multi-tool philosophy.
Admittedly for game cleaning I've never really needed to use it, just tried it. A folding, semi-serrated, 3" blade does wonders on gutting a deer up to and including sawing through the sternum and there's never an excuse for not having one.
I think I paid in the neighborhood of $50-$60 for that blade. There are definitely nicer, better looking knives out there, but I really like mine.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Harold wrote 23 weeks 1 day ago

Actually, the Marine Corps issued a bolo to its medical corpsmen. I have one made by a company called "Briddell". It was supposed to be used to quickly cut saplings for emergency litters and to clear spaces in the brush for handling casualties. If necessary, it undoubtedly made a really nasty weapon!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from davidspassage wrote 23 weeks 1 day ago

I don't know about all of you, but the best camp knife I have ever owned is only just over 4 inches in length and it is a breeze to carry. It's the Mora Bushcraft Black, and I couldn't tell you how awesome this knife is for one under $50 USD. I carry a small forest ax in the woods with me as well, so I can get away with a shorter knife. I also find a shorter knife more versatile for finer woodwork over larger knives.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Tom-Tom wrote 23 weeks 1 day ago

Those camp knives are a work of art and almost too beautiful to use. Many years ago I bought an old 2 man crosscut saw at a farm estate auction for $10 and gave it to a local old man who made knives and went door-to-door sharpening knives for housewives. In exchange he made for me an all-purpose farm knife with a 14in. blade, not unlike a corn knife. I've hacked multifloral rose from fence rows, taken many a filet from crappie to carp to flatheads, and cleared shooting lanes with it. It gets sharpened once every six months whether it needs it or not, now on my WorkSharp. It is short on beauty but long on stout. You could probably do something like that if you have a local knife maker or could even try it yourself. Just be prepared to pay a little more for that old crosscut saw today, but I still see them at faem auctions.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from davidpetzal wrote 23 weeks 23 hours ago

The late, great George Herron used to buy discarded cane-cutting knives by the basketful, re-grind them, put on a new edge and handle, and re-sell them to barbecue chefs in South Carolina. He was never short of buyers.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from VAHunter540 wrote 23 weeks 21 hours ago

Hey Dave and Phil, a little off topic from the knives but a buddy of mine was spouting off about this article he had just seen about ammo/lead shortages and mentioned that Doe Run specifically which apparently is the last of America’s domestic lead processing and manufacturing facilities was closing its doors. I would have thought that the Browning portion of Winchester in Utah or any one of the KY, or NY branches of Remington would have this capability. Could this in fact impact US ammo availability? (Among the 1,000 other outside influences).
Hoping you all might address this if it’s worth our concern. Or just clear the waters. Thanks guys!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Bernie wrote 23 weeks 20 hours ago

Mr. Petzal,

It might interest you that there is a short profile of George Herron in the latest Sporting Classics magazine. I own four of his knives, had a camp knife ordered from him in about 1980, but got divorced, moved to Alaska, then to Montana, changed addresses several times, forgot about my order. I never did receive the camp knife. That was MY fault, not Mr. Herron's. He did indeed do masterful work.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from davidpetzal wrote 23 weeks 19 hours ago

To VAHunter 450: I read about it, and will try to find out something useful.

To Bernie: Thanks for the tip, and take care of your Herrons. They are now worth a lot of money.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from RJ Arena wrote 23 weeks 18 hours ago

I love my camp knife, 7 1/2" long, Bowie style, very thick, keeps a great edge and an antler handle. Could not ask for more. I have used it to open cans, split kindling, dispatch snakes and just about anything else.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Mark-1 wrote 23 weeks 18 hours ago

Carried a camp knife for decades traveling and in military. Had it *blessed* by a bonafide witch. Had a special scabbard made for comfortable carry.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from cbanks wrote 23 weeks 18 hours ago

Nice to know that these monsters can dismember a zombie, Mr. Nut, but I have to remind you that your faithful fans need you to address the zombie menace with a more serious and comprehensive defense strategy, including caliber and loads for firearms, as well as bullet types that can reliably dispatch the undead.

We're trying to hold the line out here, but the zombie threat is real and growing, especially here in south-central PA, and you have a responsibility to your fan base.

If you can't help us, maybe we should address our concerns to your shotgun-wielding colleague, Mr.Bourjaily.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from .30-06Hunter wrote 23 weeks 17 hours ago

One can never have too many knives in the field I carry several. In my pocket I always have either a Case Trapper or Opinel carbon blade #8. In the woods a Buck 110 folding hunter and a large Cold Steel in my pack as my camp knife. I recently bought Condor's version of the Kephart Knife and was extremely disappointed with the quality and lack of an edge. I was not able to sharpen it to any kind of respectable edge. I prefer tool steel knives due to their ease of sharpening and as Mr. Petzal has said on the Gun Nuts show with tool steel as you use the knife it builds character.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Wayne McLemore wrote 23 weeks 17 hours ago

As a historical note: the bowie, that most all-American of knives, was regularly carried and used for camp knife duties, and was surely used for that far more than for conflict resolution. (OTOH, especially in the era before repeating firearms, bowies got a lot of use in the latter role.)

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from ozarkghost wrote 23 weeks 16 hours ago

I have a Bowie knife that my brother gave me as a graduation gift in 1976. I have chopped vines, split wood, and used it for cutting food and meat. I keep it razor sharp with just a little maintenance and it is still going strong.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Carl Huber wrote 23 weeks 15 hours ago

I have a U.S. issue WWI Bolo machete dated 1912 it's been in my family that long. The handle broke and was replaced with Elk horn. You can see it on my profile. If you have have spare horn it's a good project.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from O Garcia wrote 23 weeks 14 hours ago

in most of the exotic places in Africa and Asia where you'll likely hunt, those are the only knives the men carry in the field. The knives often have a simple grind, maybe not as sharp as shaving sharp, but the edge can withstand a lot of abuse. They're expected to do everything, clear vegetation, cut firewood, butcher animals, chop onions, fruits, potatoes etc. (if they're made of plain carbon steel, they leave a stain on, and get stained by, the sliced food), and be useful as a carving tool to help pass away dull time. They go by names like bolo, golok, parang, etc.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from kudukid wrote 23 weeks 5 hours ago

Anecdotal evidence:

The small banana grove in the backyard produces individuals with diameters up to 6". Wife wants them cut down after the first freeze - no problem with 8" blade of WWII era Western W46. One big swish at each, at a downward angle, and they're down.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from davidpetzal wrote 23 weeks 2 hours ago

To Wayne McLemore: Since no one knows for certain what Jim Bowie's knife looked like, just about anything can be called a Bowie. The original was used on people, and was almost certainly a big, heavy knife. Much smaller Bowies were tremendously popular for sporting use during the 19th century, but were gradually supplanted by non-weapons such as the Marble's Ideal.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Happy Myles wrote 22 weeks 6 days ago

I have a beautiful machete, or panga in Kiswahili , crafted by Weldon Whitley. Only loaned it once to a local, to them it is a tool, not a show piece. They use them for everything from cutting meat to digging holes for the pole holding up a leopard blind. The fellow I loaned mine to almost cut his foot off with it.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Happy Myles wrote 22 weeks 6 days ago

I have a beautiful machete, or panga in Kiswahili , crafted by Weldon Whitley. Only loaned it once to a local, to them it is a tool, not a show piece. They use them for everything from cutting meat to digging holes for the pole holding up a leopard blind. The fellow I loaned mine to almost cut his foot off with it.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from kudukid wrote 22 weeks 6 days ago

The F&S double-devil strikes again!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from O Garcia wrote 22 weeks 6 days ago

Camp knives also tend to defy our rules about knives (which often happen to be folders) like "knives are for cutting, not hacking or prying." They're tough. You probably shouldn't abuse yours, but if it's well made, it will take the abuse.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from duckcreekdick wrote 22 weeks 6 days ago

A camp knife is a poor substitute for a camp axe. A small axe of the Hudson's Bay pattern, like mine made by Husqvarna, will do so much more work and do it safely.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Safado wrote 22 weeks 5 days ago

I carry a hatchet so I'm not really a camp knife guy. The largest knife that I carry into the field is about 5-1/2" long. Sometimes I also carry a small folding saw. There seems to be a belief that hatchets and camp axes are more dangerous than a large knife. I think pairing a hatchet with a knife gives me a little more versatility. I would love to hear the pros and cons on hatchets versus camp knives.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Jim Blum wrote 22 weeks 5 days ago

My Camp Knife and all around outdoor knife is my Kabar USMC fighting knife it's large enough heavy enough sharp enough and has never failed me where ever I was..

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from edalweber wrote 22 weeks 5 days ago

A number of old time(pre WWII) outdoor writers usedd to make the point that big massive knives like Bowies were really fighting knives not really suited to camp use. Charles B. Roth mentioned that he had a couple of old skinning knives that had been used to skin thousands of buffalo in the old days, as both had 4-4 1/2 inch blades Smaller knives with about a 4 inch blade were what you needed for general camp use.Big knives were only hunting knives in the sense that in the days of the muzzle loaders you might need one for last ditch defense against an attacking animal.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Ralph the Rifleman wrote 22 weeks 5 days ago

That is one sweet knife!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from New Age Bubba wrote 22 weeks 2 days ago

Dave, thanks for including the old standby Buck Knife in your articles. And I understand that most of their line is still made in the USA.

0 Good Comment? | | Report

Post a Comment

from davidspassage wrote 23 weeks 1 day ago

I don't know about all of you, but the best camp knife I have ever owned is only just over 4 inches in length and it is a breeze to carry. It's the Mora Bushcraft Black, and I couldn't tell you how awesome this knife is for one under $50 USD. I carry a small forest ax in the woods with me as well, so I can get away with a shorter knife. I also find a shorter knife more versatile for finer woodwork over larger knives.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from davidpetzal wrote 23 weeks 23 hours ago

The late, great George Herron used to buy discarded cane-cutting knives by the basketful, re-grind them, put on a new edge and handle, and re-sell them to barbecue chefs in South Carolina. He was never short of buyers.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from davidpetzal wrote 23 weeks 19 hours ago

To VAHunter 450: I read about it, and will try to find out something useful.

To Bernie: Thanks for the tip, and take care of your Herrons. They are now worth a lot of money.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from .30-06Hunter wrote 23 weeks 17 hours ago

One can never have too many knives in the field I carry several. In my pocket I always have either a Case Trapper or Opinel carbon blade #8. In the woods a Buck 110 folding hunter and a large Cold Steel in my pack as my camp knife. I recently bought Condor's version of the Kephart Knife and was extremely disappointed with the quality and lack of an edge. I was not able to sharpen it to any kind of respectable edge. I prefer tool steel knives due to their ease of sharpening and as Mr. Petzal has said on the Gun Nuts show with tool steel as you use the knife it builds character.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from bluegrass45 wrote 23 weeks 1 day ago

This guy's knives are beautiful, and that camp knife is elegant.

But.....90 inch? Eek.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from jcarlin wrote 23 weeks 1 day ago

I have a KaBar Camp Knife (possibly discontinued and replaced with the short cutlass) that I've owned for the past 6 years or so and currently lives next to the fireplace where just yesterday I was using it and a baton to break a piece of cordwood down to kindling. It's all around useful and at that task is a not too distant second from a hatchet.
I happen to really like this blade. It's proven to be tough, it holds it's edge fairly well even under the kind of abuse described, it's beg bellied forward weight design makes a good chopper.
In the grand scheme of things that I've put it to use doing it's too light to be a good axe, too short to be a good machete and too large to be a good game cleaner. But for a tool that weighs about a tenth of the combined cutlery listed above, it'll do the job when the others aren't handy, just with a bit more effort (and in the case of use as a machete, you'll appreciate having work gloves even more). I look at it as a fairly heavy general utility tool. For less than 2 pounds it gives you a lot of options. It's the multi-tool philosophy.
Admittedly for game cleaning I've never really needed to use it, just tried it. A folding, semi-serrated, 3" blade does wonders on gutting a deer up to and including sawing through the sternum and there's never an excuse for not having one.
I think I paid in the neighborhood of $50-$60 for that blade. There are definitely nicer, better looking knives out there, but I really like mine.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Harold wrote 23 weeks 1 day ago

Actually, the Marine Corps issued a bolo to its medical corpsmen. I have one made by a company called "Briddell". It was supposed to be used to quickly cut saplings for emergency litters and to clear spaces in the brush for handling casualties. If necessary, it undoubtedly made a really nasty weapon!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Tom-Tom wrote 23 weeks 1 day ago

Those camp knives are a work of art and almost too beautiful to use. Many years ago I bought an old 2 man crosscut saw at a farm estate auction for $10 and gave it to a local old man who made knives and went door-to-door sharpening knives for housewives. In exchange he made for me an all-purpose farm knife with a 14in. blade, not unlike a corn knife. I've hacked multifloral rose from fence rows, taken many a filet from crappie to carp to flatheads, and cleared shooting lanes with it. It gets sharpened once every six months whether it needs it or not, now on my WorkSharp. It is short on beauty but long on stout. You could probably do something like that if you have a local knife maker or could even try it yourself. Just be prepared to pay a little more for that old crosscut saw today, but I still see them at faem auctions.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from VAHunter540 wrote 23 weeks 21 hours ago

Hey Dave and Phil, a little off topic from the knives but a buddy of mine was spouting off about this article he had just seen about ammo/lead shortages and mentioned that Doe Run specifically which apparently is the last of America’s domestic lead processing and manufacturing facilities was closing its doors. I would have thought that the Browning portion of Winchester in Utah or any one of the KY, or NY branches of Remington would have this capability. Could this in fact impact US ammo availability? (Among the 1,000 other outside influences).
Hoping you all might address this if it’s worth our concern. Or just clear the waters. Thanks guys!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Bernie wrote 23 weeks 20 hours ago

Mr. Petzal,

It might interest you that there is a short profile of George Herron in the latest Sporting Classics magazine. I own four of his knives, had a camp knife ordered from him in about 1980, but got divorced, moved to Alaska, then to Montana, changed addresses several times, forgot about my order. I never did receive the camp knife. That was MY fault, not Mr. Herron's. He did indeed do masterful work.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from RJ Arena wrote 23 weeks 18 hours ago

I love my camp knife, 7 1/2" long, Bowie style, very thick, keeps a great edge and an antler handle. Could not ask for more. I have used it to open cans, split kindling, dispatch snakes and just about anything else.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Mark-1 wrote 23 weeks 18 hours ago

Carried a camp knife for decades traveling and in military. Had it *blessed* by a bonafide witch. Had a special scabbard made for comfortable carry.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from cbanks wrote 23 weeks 18 hours ago

Nice to know that these monsters can dismember a zombie, Mr. Nut, but I have to remind you that your faithful fans need you to address the zombie menace with a more serious and comprehensive defense strategy, including caliber and loads for firearms, as well as bullet types that can reliably dispatch the undead.

We're trying to hold the line out here, but the zombie threat is real and growing, especially here in south-central PA, and you have a responsibility to your fan base.

If you can't help us, maybe we should address our concerns to your shotgun-wielding colleague, Mr.Bourjaily.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Wayne McLemore wrote 23 weeks 17 hours ago

As a historical note: the bowie, that most all-American of knives, was regularly carried and used for camp knife duties, and was surely used for that far more than for conflict resolution. (OTOH, especially in the era before repeating firearms, bowies got a lot of use in the latter role.)

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from ozarkghost wrote 23 weeks 16 hours ago

I have a Bowie knife that my brother gave me as a graduation gift in 1976. I have chopped vines, split wood, and used it for cutting food and meat. I keep it razor sharp with just a little maintenance and it is still going strong.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Carl Huber wrote 23 weeks 15 hours ago

I have a U.S. issue WWI Bolo machete dated 1912 it's been in my family that long. The handle broke and was replaced with Elk horn. You can see it on my profile. If you have have spare horn it's a good project.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from O Garcia wrote 23 weeks 14 hours ago

in most of the exotic places in Africa and Asia where you'll likely hunt, those are the only knives the men carry in the field. The knives often have a simple grind, maybe not as sharp as shaving sharp, but the edge can withstand a lot of abuse. They're expected to do everything, clear vegetation, cut firewood, butcher animals, chop onions, fruits, potatoes etc. (if they're made of plain carbon steel, they leave a stain on, and get stained by, the sliced food), and be useful as a carving tool to help pass away dull time. They go by names like bolo, golok, parang, etc.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from kudukid wrote 23 weeks 5 hours ago

Anecdotal evidence:

The small banana grove in the backyard produces individuals with diameters up to 6". Wife wants them cut down after the first freeze - no problem with 8" blade of WWII era Western W46. One big swish at each, at a downward angle, and they're down.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from davidpetzal wrote 23 weeks 2 hours ago

To Wayne McLemore: Since no one knows for certain what Jim Bowie's knife looked like, just about anything can be called a Bowie. The original was used on people, and was almost certainly a big, heavy knife. Much smaller Bowies were tremendously popular for sporting use during the 19th century, but were gradually supplanted by non-weapons such as the Marble's Ideal.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Happy Myles wrote 22 weeks 6 days ago

I have a beautiful machete, or panga in Kiswahili , crafted by Weldon Whitley. Only loaned it once to a local, to them it is a tool, not a show piece. They use them for everything from cutting meat to digging holes for the pole holding up a leopard blind. The fellow I loaned mine to almost cut his foot off with it.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Happy Myles wrote 22 weeks 6 days ago

I have a beautiful machete, or panga in Kiswahili , crafted by Weldon Whitley. Only loaned it once to a local, to them it is a tool, not a show piece. They use them for everything from cutting meat to digging holes for the pole holding up a leopard blind. The fellow I loaned mine to almost cut his foot off with it.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from kudukid wrote 22 weeks 6 days ago

The F&S double-devil strikes again!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from O Garcia wrote 22 weeks 6 days ago

Camp knives also tend to defy our rules about knives (which often happen to be folders) like "knives are for cutting, not hacking or prying." They're tough. You probably shouldn't abuse yours, but if it's well made, it will take the abuse.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from duckcreekdick wrote 22 weeks 6 days ago

A camp knife is a poor substitute for a camp axe. A small axe of the Hudson's Bay pattern, like mine made by Husqvarna, will do so much more work and do it safely.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Safado wrote 22 weeks 5 days ago

I carry a hatchet so I'm not really a camp knife guy. The largest knife that I carry into the field is about 5-1/2" long. Sometimes I also carry a small folding saw. There seems to be a belief that hatchets and camp axes are more dangerous than a large knife. I think pairing a hatchet with a knife gives me a little more versatility. I would love to hear the pros and cons on hatchets versus camp knives.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Jim Blum wrote 22 weeks 5 days ago

My Camp Knife and all around outdoor knife is my Kabar USMC fighting knife it's large enough heavy enough sharp enough and has never failed me where ever I was..

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from edalweber wrote 22 weeks 5 days ago

A number of old time(pre WWII) outdoor writers usedd to make the point that big massive knives like Bowies were really fighting knives not really suited to camp use. Charles B. Roth mentioned that he had a couple of old skinning knives that had been used to skin thousands of buffalo in the old days, as both had 4-4 1/2 inch blades Smaller knives with about a 4 inch blade were what you needed for general camp use.Big knives were only hunting knives in the sense that in the days of the muzzle loaders you might need one for last ditch defense against an attacking animal.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Ralph the Rifleman wrote 22 weeks 5 days ago

That is one sweet knife!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from New Age Bubba wrote 22 weeks 2 days ago

Dave, thanks for including the old standby Buck Knife in your articles. And I understand that most of their line is still made in the USA.

0 Good Comment? | | Report

Post a Comment

bmxbiz-fs