Please Sign In

Please enter a valid username and password
  • Log in with Facebook
» Not a member? Take a moment to register
» Forgot Username or Password

Why Register?
Signing up could earn you gear (click here to learn how)! It also keeps offensive content off our site.

Duck Hunting: Shooting in a Coffin Blind

Recent Comments

Categories

Recent Posts

Archives

Syndicate

Google Reader or Homepage
Add to My Yahoo!
Add to My AOL

The Gun Nuts
in your Inbox

Enter your email address to get our new post everyday.

November 29, 2013

Duck Hunting: Shooting in a Coffin Blind

By Phil Bourjaily

http://ak.c.ooyala.com/h2bTdyaDoN1A3vbj07CbI3Pm6ArXWU-n/Ut_HKthATH4eww8X4xMDoxOjA4MTsiGN

Last week I wrote about my duck hunt on the flats of the Great Salt Lake in Utah. We hunted out of coffin blinds, which was a first for me, although I have done a lot of shooting out of layout blinds and sneak boats. Coffin blinds are the same thing, but they are waterproof so you can use them in a few inches of water. Shooting off your back is a lot harder than shooting with your feet under you. 

A couple of tips can make it easier. First, angle your blind so it’s pointed to the right (if you’re right-handed) of where the ducks will land. The easiest shot from a lying down position is about 20 degrees to the left. You can swing a long way to the left but not so well to the right before you bind up. Second, don’t rush. Ducks aren’t looking at you—they’re focused on the decoys. You can’t dawdle, but you can take the time to be as smooth as is feasibly possible when you’re trying to sit up, mount the gun, and shoot in a tippy coffin blind.

The GoPro guys were along on the trip and they set up their cameras in the decoys to take this video of me and GoPro’s Ryan Chuckel banging away. Notice how the recoil lifts our feet out of the water. 

 

Comments (9)

Top Rated
All Comments
from Ralph the Rifleman wrote 19 weeks 4 days ago

Hey Phil, is a video missing on this post?

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Matthew Dykstra wrote 19 weeks 4 days ago

It is there for me.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from z41 wrote 19 weeks 4 days ago

That sure isn't what I figured a coffin blind would look like. It's a boat to me. Laying on your back and shooting from a small jon boat. Anyway that's my thought, but then I'm a Pheasant hunter. What kind of a shotgun were you shooting?

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Dangle wrote 19 weeks 4 days ago

Great locale to get used to shooting 3 1/2" mag shells.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Ontario Honker ... wrote 19 weeks 3 days ago

3.5" shells for teal? Really?

I shot out of a layout blind once and decided I didn't need geese that bad. Hated shooting off my arse which was frozen hard as a brick. Best tip I could suggest is never hunt geese out of a box on a windless day. They will drop down from every direction. On a day with wind, position yourself downwind of the set with the decoys at about eleven o'clock. Geese will land into the wind. I hunt from hedgerows and in same conditions will position decoys about forty to fifty yards away at nine o'clock. I prefer overhead pass shots as opposed to creaming them when they're landing in the decoys. Not much skill involved in that. Overhead pass shots are not easy shooting from your butt in a box!

-1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Longbeard wrote 19 weeks 2 days ago

OH - I'm with you on the discomfort and ungainliness of shooting from layout and coffin blinds (I thought there would be more to a coffin than this too, Z41). Only used a layout once - on a goose/sandhill hunt in TX and hated it. But most duck & geese shooting spots don't have hedgerows. Even the marsh where I hunt ducks at home in FLA doesn't offer much cover. And as far as shooting "decoying" birds, most of us don't have the opportunity to hunt MOL unschooled birds who haven't been shot at all the way down the flyway like you do up in Canada & northern tier states. By the time the birds get to FLA, it takes a great deal of skill & patience to arrange a good deek spread, call the birds in, keep yourself and your dog steady while watching the birds circle and check out your spread, and get the birds in close enough just for a shot. If we manage to get the birds to set their wings and drop the landing gear, we know we've done EVERYTHING right and have EARNED the right to shoot those birds as close as we can. The satisfaction and sense of accomplishment is truly fulfilling, and the close shots make for far fewer wounded birds flying away to die later that day and become gator chum (I heard a bull gator grunting about 150 yds from me Saturday - gotta keep a close eye on the dog!). BTW, I'm not a fan of 3 1/2" cartuchos either, but where did it say Phil was hunting teal? Did I miss that?

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Longbeard wrote 19 weeks 2 days ago

I did not add the link on landing gear. Some add-on must have infiltrated my post. sorry gang.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from philbourjaily wrote 19 weeks 2 days ago

I like shooting off my back, but it definitely takes some getting used to.

As for the guns and ammo on that hunt, I never shoot 3 1/2-inch shells. We shot 3-inch Blindside 2s and 3-inch Blackcloud 3s on this hunt. The gun is a Browning Maxus Sporting Clays gun, which does have a 3-inch chamber.

To me the goal of waterfowling is to fool the birds into giving me the easiest shooting possible.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Ontario Honker ... wrote 19 weeks 2 days ago

Thanks for clarifying that, Phil. I suspected Dangle was jumping to conclusions, hence the question marks.

Longbeard: Phil's earlier blog indicated they were shooting teal and shovelers but he was mostly passing on the latter. Also it had a beautiful image of the gun he was using. Pass shooting is my preference and, yes, the fact that I have a lot of shooting up here certainly has something to do with my choice. I don't put down you or others who take landing shots when they are available. On a slow day I might do the same. But I am retired with fantastic goose hunting twenty minutes from home. So I'm able to pick and choose.

0 Good Comment? | | Report

Post a Comment

from Ralph the Rifleman wrote 19 weeks 4 days ago

Hey Phil, is a video missing on this post?

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Matthew Dykstra wrote 19 weeks 4 days ago

It is there for me.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from z41 wrote 19 weeks 4 days ago

That sure isn't what I figured a coffin blind would look like. It's a boat to me. Laying on your back and shooting from a small jon boat. Anyway that's my thought, but then I'm a Pheasant hunter. What kind of a shotgun were you shooting?

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Dangle wrote 19 weeks 4 days ago

Great locale to get used to shooting 3 1/2" mag shells.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Longbeard wrote 19 weeks 2 days ago

OH - I'm with you on the discomfort and ungainliness of shooting from layout and coffin blinds (I thought there would be more to a coffin than this too, Z41). Only used a layout once - on a goose/sandhill hunt in TX and hated it. But most duck & geese shooting spots don't have hedgerows. Even the marsh where I hunt ducks at home in FLA doesn't offer much cover. And as far as shooting "decoying" birds, most of us don't have the opportunity to hunt MOL unschooled birds who haven't been shot at all the way down the flyway like you do up in Canada & northern tier states. By the time the birds get to FLA, it takes a great deal of skill & patience to arrange a good deek spread, call the birds in, keep yourself and your dog steady while watching the birds circle and check out your spread, and get the birds in close enough just for a shot. If we manage to get the birds to set their wings and drop the landing gear, we know we've done EVERYTHING right and have EARNED the right to shoot those birds as close as we can. The satisfaction and sense of accomplishment is truly fulfilling, and the close shots make for far fewer wounded birds flying away to die later that day and become gator chum (I heard a bull gator grunting about 150 yds from me Saturday - gotta keep a close eye on the dog!). BTW, I'm not a fan of 3 1/2" cartuchos either, but where did it say Phil was hunting teal? Did I miss that?

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Longbeard wrote 19 weeks 2 days ago

I did not add the link on landing gear. Some add-on must have infiltrated my post. sorry gang.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from philbourjaily wrote 19 weeks 2 days ago

I like shooting off my back, but it definitely takes some getting used to.

As for the guns and ammo on that hunt, I never shoot 3 1/2-inch shells. We shot 3-inch Blindside 2s and 3-inch Blackcloud 3s on this hunt. The gun is a Browning Maxus Sporting Clays gun, which does have a 3-inch chamber.

To me the goal of waterfowling is to fool the birds into giving me the easiest shooting possible.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Ontario Honker ... wrote 19 weeks 2 days ago

Thanks for clarifying that, Phil. I suspected Dangle was jumping to conclusions, hence the question marks.

Longbeard: Phil's earlier blog indicated they were shooting teal and shovelers but he was mostly passing on the latter. Also it had a beautiful image of the gun he was using. Pass shooting is my preference and, yes, the fact that I have a lot of shooting up here certainly has something to do with my choice. I don't put down you or others who take landing shots when they are available. On a slow day I might do the same. But I am retired with fantastic goose hunting twenty minutes from home. So I'm able to pick and choose.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Ontario Honker ... wrote 19 weeks 3 days ago

3.5" shells for teal? Really?

I shot out of a layout blind once and decided I didn't need geese that bad. Hated shooting off my arse which was frozen hard as a brick. Best tip I could suggest is never hunt geese out of a box on a windless day. They will drop down from every direction. On a day with wind, position yourself downwind of the set with the decoys at about eleven o'clock. Geese will land into the wind. I hunt from hedgerows and in same conditions will position decoys about forty to fifty yards away at nine o'clock. I prefer overhead pass shots as opposed to creaming them when they're landing in the decoys. Not much skill involved in that. Overhead pass shots are not easy shooting from your butt in a box!

-1 Good Comment? | | Report

Post a Comment

bmxbiz-fs