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14 Items for Your Range Bag

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December 09, 2013

14 Items for Your Range Bag

By David E. Petzal

One of the principal goals of shooting is the accumulation of Stuff. There is Hunting Stuff, and Handloading Stuff, and Range Stuff, and if you want to go to the range you need something to carry your Range Stuff in, and that is a range bag. You can, of course, carry your Range Stuff in a .50-caliber-ammo can, but if you can fit it all in one of these it means you don't have enough Stuff and probably have not evolved much past Homo heidelbergensis anyway. If you're a competitive rifle shooter, you can carry your Stuff in a modified shopping cart, which is OK, because you probably have so much that you can't lift it without tearing a rotator cuff.

Brownell's, Blackhawk, and Cabela's sell all manner of range bags at all manner of prices, and you have to decide how splendid you want yours to be. My own range bag is an inexpensive nylon one that I received years ago as a minor bribe, and since it has my name on it I'm kind of fond of the thing, but as a rule, avoid the real cheap ones as they won't hold up.

What do you carry in a range bag? Here's a list which you can augment if the whim takes you:

1. Headphones and extra batteries for the headphones if they're the electronic kind. It's also a good idea to carry a second set of headphones as some dumb bastard is always going to show up without them.
2. A good strong takedown cleaning rod for knocking out stuck cases and bullets. Get it in .22; that way it will work in any size bore. I guarantee that you or someone else is going to need it.
3. Staple gun and extra staples.
4. Screwdriver set designed for guns. A must. The one you want is the Wheeler Engineering Space Saver set.
5. Screwdriver set designed for scope rings and mounts. The Leupold Mounting Tool.
6. A small but tasteful first-aid kit, because s**t happens.
7. A Leatherman Tool. Do I have to explain?
8. If you run matches, a stopwatch and a loud whistle. Check the whistle before you buy it. A lot of them are pathetic.
9. If your range requires them, empty chamber indicators.
10. A Rite in the Rain pad—waterproof paper that won't disintegrate in the damp. A couple of Fisher Space Pens, which write under any conditions.  If you have a brain in your head you'll be writing stuff down.
11. If you use a chronograph, keep the pad in which you enter results in your shooting bag.
12. Duct tape. See Leatherman Tool.
13. Red and black Sharpie pens for marking up targets with notes such as "WTF?" "Why is this happening to me?" "What did I ever do that was so bad?"
14. In the summer, bug repellent. The most savage, bloodthirsty insects favor shooting ranges.

Comments (27)

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from Ontario Honker ... wrote 18 weeks 4 days ago

I'm not a range sort of person but I do have to sight in my rifle once a year. Or rather I did back in the days when I was big game hunting. Everyone is encouraging me to take it up again. Actually giving it some thought too. I wind up gutting everyone else's deer every year so maybe if I do the shooting they'll do the dirty work for a change.

Anyway, this seems to be a very sensible list! I would add toilet paper to my bag as the "range" I usually use is an old gravel pit out in the middle of nowhere. I almost never carry TP with me when hunting but I rarely eat so it's usually not an issue. However, for some reason sighting in my rifle seems to rattle the sh*t out of me. I don't own a Leatherman and my lovely late wife who always seemed to know exactly what to stick in my Christmas stocking seemed to always overlook them when picking out gifts. Now that baby Parker is here my daughter says we have to have Christmas again so maybe I should drop the hint. How does one do that?

I digress. As usual. I would add to this list sticky dots. It's better to cover up the bullet holes in the unlikely (but it seems unusually common) event that one round lands exactly where another one already passed through. Simply marking the previous bullet hole with an X won't help. I have found that the peel off dots are better than the lick-and-stick ones. The latter often tend to fall off the target. Trying to tear off little chunks of duct tape would be time and fingernail consuming.

What is an "empty chamber indicator"?

As to bug dope, up here there is nothing for it but to wait till cool fall days before sighting in guns. The bugs are so thick during the summer they would significantly deflect the course of a .458 Win at even fifty yards.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Ontario Honker ... wrote 18 weeks 4 days ago

I lost my el-cheapo dog whistle when I was hunting this fall. That dime store whistle was no loss but I sure felt bad about losing the braided lanyard. Anyway ... I was advised to go to a local sports supply store and pick up a replacement. Good advice! Whistles for referees are what you want. Cost five or six bucks but well worth it. No marbles inside to fall apart or dissolve, the spit drains out the bottom (unless it's minus twenty!), they are sturdy plastic rather than metal that'll freeze to the lips, and the sound is shrill enough to be heard a country mile.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Happy Myles wrote 18 weeks 4 days ago

My range bag is a 50 year old Gokeys faded green canvas with leather trim. My list is similar to,David's with a couple additions. Where is your rifle rest and bag for the toe of your rifle butt.? I also have three six inch pieces of 2x4 to raise heavy caliber rifles on my rest. I can handle the huge recoil better if I am a little higher behind the stock. Brownell"s. sells a selection of gun screws which I keep in my bag. I will be at the range tomorrow.

Anyone going to Dallas Safari Club Convention.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from T.W. Davidson wrote 18 weeks 4 days ago

"Homo heidelbergensis," I gather, refers to a probable but extinct sub-species of modern man. (Let us all hope we are evolved beyond this, or that we soon do, for otherwise we will surely suffer the same fate.)

When I first read this blog entry, I thought you (Mr. Petzal), being astute, educated and refined, were referring to Heisenberg and his Uncertainty Principle. Heisenberg meant his Principle to apply to the movement and location of sub-atomic particles--like quarks. However, and in my opinion, the Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle applies equally to the world of shooting, including Stuff you put (or don't) in a range bag and take to the range.

In its original form, and as applied to the world of quantum mechanics, the Uncertainty Principle holds that while we may be able to determine the location of a sub-atomic particle, if so we will not be able to determine its speed or direction. Contra, if we are able to determine the speed and direction of a sub-atomic particle, we will not be able to determine its location at a given point in time.

Applied to shooting, while we may know the exact location of a given cartridge--in the chamber of our best rifle--we may never know exactly the speed or direction of its bullet when we pull the trigger. A good predictable guess, surely yes, but exactitude, no. (Notice the target or deer or elk you've just inexplicably missed with the handload you sent six months developing.)

Contra, via the chronograph and the paper target, we can determine the speed and direction of our bullet, but never its exact location at a given point of time during its trajectory. (Notice the perfect bullseye hole in the target, yet you pulled the shot and you know you pulled the shot and you would have confidentally bet $20 before looking that you seriously missed the bullseye.)

As to range bags and the Stuff we put (or don't) in them, the Uncertainty Principle is alive and well. Applied thusly, it works as follows:

1. If you put everything you could possibly need into a range bag, two beyond-a-reasonable-doubt probabilities will then unfold and secretly lie in wait for you in the hours to come: (A) you will forget the bag at home; or (B) at the range, and when a problem occurs, you will not be able to find (in the bag) the one thing you absolutely need to solve the problem--even though, yes, that thing is somewhere in the bag, because an hour earlier you just put it there, and your kids and wife and dog and shooting partner saw you do it.

2. If you put into the bag only what you are positive you will need at the range, once you get to the range you will soon absolutely need the one thing you really didn't put in the bag . . . and no one else at the range has it either.

The Uncertainty Principle--The Shooter's Version

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from RJ Arena wrote 18 weeks 3 days ago

I did not see on your list Eye protection, a must, and for us old fogies, readers so we can use those tools or read boxes of ammo. While I am on the vision kick, lens cleaner for the glasses and the scope. I also like a gun rag to wipe everything down with before leaving the range, things can happen before you get a chance to properly clean your toys.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from davidpetzal wrote 18 weeks 3 days ago

To Ontario Honker: An ECI, or Empty Chamber Indicator, is an L-shaped piece of plastic that's used to show that the chamber is empty and that the bolt is open. It's used at rifle matches and some enlightened ranges. When "Cease fire" is called, you pull the bolt back, insert the long end of the L up the barrel and let the bolt close on the short end of the L, which protrudes from the action. This way, anyone who looks at it will know that your rifle is safe, especially the range officer, who will remind you nicely if don't pop in your ECI. If you don't do it a second time, he will ask you nicely to pack up your stuff and leave.

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from Happy Myles wrote 18 weeks 3 days ago

Just curious. How crowded are your ranges these days? Most of the Southern California ranges have closed. Therefore, the few left get pretty busy. The one I have been going to for decades has gone from a scattered number of shooters to several hundred on weekends. I only go on week days since retiring. Most folks are pounding away with military type firearms. Serious hunters are few, and far between.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Trap12 wrote 18 weeks 3 days ago

If you don't bring CLP or some kind of lubricant to the range, you may end up using your space pen and waterproof pad to write yourself a reminder not to forget it again after your weapon locks up.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from crm3006 wrote 18 weeks 3 days ago

I can carry all of my range gear in the back of a 250 Super Duty. Range bags would not carry my ammo.
Happy Myles-our range is a membership club that requires proof of NRA membership. I understand there is a waiting list. I usually find several shooters on the bench rest and long distance ranges every time I manage to get out there.

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from Tim Platt wrote 18 weeks 3 days ago

vj9ruAdd an 18" 6X6 for the fore end and 4X4 for the rear plus some 50 pound sand bags. I like my rifles up high too, and a Leupold lenspen.

No range master at my range. Only a bunch of rednecks who scream hot and cold whenever they want to walk to their targets. Thumbtacks are a must, and extra ear plugs to pass out to newbies. I use a green canvas bag that is about 2' X 18" X 10" with a leather shoulder strap. My wife swears is was her suitcase once upon a time but I am sure she must be mistaken. It has been full of ammo and earplugs and magazines and tools since I can remember, which is not long.

My range has been extremely slow for over a year, thank God. It used to be free because it is on a Wildlife Management Area and the wildlife officer who lived there just kind of took care of it but now they charge $5.50 for three hours so people just shoot in their own back yards. Not hard to do in Tennessee. Plus now they do a background check and if a felon shows up to buy a range permit they confiscate his weapons and vehicle... great policy!

And yes in the last 5 years the range has been flooded with black rifles owned by idiots who have no concept of the rules of the range or gun safety in general. They can't even get on paper at 100 yards with sandbags and I shoot a little 10/22 and blow up clay pigeons 10 in a row with 10 shots at the same distance. When they see my targets they are amazed. It really pisses them off when I shoot my AR offhand looking through the carry handle and hit the clay pigeons one right after the other.

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from Tim Platt wrote 18 weeks 3 days ago

I forgot I now always carry a can of Hoppe's Blast & Shine. If you have problems at the range it is a godsend.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from RockySquirrel wrote 18 weeks 3 days ago

Lets add to the list: Your older Binoculars (spotting scope on 100 yard seems to be over kill), extra targets (I print my own on a laser printer), Sticky dots or peel off dots as Honker recommended. Masking tape (sometimes you run out of staples), CLP, BULL BAG is a fantastic add in. See (www(dot).Bullsbag(dot)com). Some extra sandbags. A fine metal file for the sites on un-scoped non-adjustable guns (yes there still are a few). 1 gal plastic freezer bag to take your brass home. One of each size if you don’t want to sort later. A pair of heavy leather work gloves has come in handy a time or 2. Occasionally a range finder. Not every range is accurate. Bottled water is a must have. Hat and sun screen if you are going to be there for a while. Trash bag.

Shooting a muzzleloader has it s own set of tools. Rod and jag for 50 cal. cleaning patches, lube, one of those co2 muzzleloader bullet expellers. C02 cartridges. Extra powder and measure.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Mark-1 wrote 18 weeks 3 days ago

DP, Yours is a short list compared to what a black powder rifle shooter needs & takes to the range.

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from WA Mtnhunter wrote 18 weeks 3 days ago

Happy Myles,

No DSC this year. Waterfowl hunting has been poor so far this year and the big black dawg threatened me if I went off anywhere other than goose hunting between now and January 26th....

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from jhjimbo wrote 18 weeks 3 days ago

The Club has about 400 members and I go during the week and am usually the only one there. There are several ranges from 100 to 300yd rifle and also 6 separate pistol ranges.
My gear includes a few other things. I have cleaning supplies, solvent and oil with me. A boat cushion as most of the seats on the benches are too low for me. A shoulder pad for recoil and recoil gloves for handguns. Spotting scope with tripod. Extra battery for chronograph. Hearing protection. Screwdriver with assorted tips. Ammo is carried in another box and all shells are returned to the box they came from. We are required to pick up all brass. Reload data collection is important to me so I have notebooks for that. I used to load 3000 to 4000 rounds a year but that has been cut back some lately. I do like to experiment with various loads in various rifles. Always take several rifles so some are in the cooling rack as I am shooting others.

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from kudukid wrote 18 weeks 3 days ago

Happy Myles:

Is Kalifornia still part of America? Rhode Island left years ago to join the Soviet Union...

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from 1uglymutha wrote 18 weeks 3 days ago

I am fortunate to live in a shooter's paradise (western Colorado). Un-crowded ranges most weekday mornings except right before hunting season (my range work is always done by then). And there's always the desert where I utilize a very sturdy shooting bench (homemade) or a shooting mat and bipod.There is plenty of space and time for lots of field position shooting as well. A good rangefinder allows shooting at any distance with plenty of large mountains to use as backstops. Living in the Rocky Mountain west has huge advantages for hunters and shooters. All we need now is more ammo and reloading components.

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from kudukid wrote 18 weeks 3 days ago

To 1uglymutha:

What you need in Colorado right now is a whole lot more recall referendums!

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from 5280Shooter wrote 18 weeks 2 days ago

DEP: My range bag is from Red Oxx Mfg in Montana and they make super tough soft sided bags. Believe the owner learned his craft sewing parachutes for the Army Rangers. And, because I am not the Omnipotent Godfather of Guns and Gear, my name is not on the bag. The only things I would add to the list are a small 6" ruler so I can get a quick evalution of group sizes, a microfiber cloth to clean my scope lenses and my front and rear Protektor leather rests. They are outstanding.
Happy: The public range in my area is very busy but the average shooter is much different than years past. Mostly handgun and semi-auto rifles these days. When I'm shooting, my rifle is likely the only bolt gun on the line.

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from RS08 wrote 18 weeks 2 days ago

Ontario honker, sticky dots are a great idea. here all these years I've been thinking I'm off paper after the first shot, when I've been shooting one hole groups ;).

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from deadeyedick wrote 18 weeks 2 days ago

I'm one of those guys that takes everything but the kitchen sink. I really don't like to go to the range then remember someting I need better to take it with you and not needed it than to find out you need and not have it. I would add just one item to your list and that is; a pound of coomon sense and a big spoon

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from deadeyedick wrote 18 weeks 2 days ago

I'm one of those guys that takes everything but the kitchen sink. I really don't like to go to the range then remember someting I need better to take it with you and not needed it than to find out you need and not have it. I would add just one item to your list and that is; a pound of coomon sense and a big spoon

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from Happy Myles wrote 18 weeks 2 days ago

I always keep a few orange dots in my wallet for targets, surprising how easy they make sighting in around the world.

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from tunadave wrote 18 weeks 1 day ago

Also check out the range bags from MidwayUSA. I bought their "large one" several years ago, and it's been great. More pockets than Captain Kangaroo, and they are all padded. It's become my favorite carry-on for airlines as well. Just the right size, easy to carry, and tough. If you know how to pack, you can get an impressive amount of gear in there, including your hygiene kit. The only problem I had with it was one of the pieces of velcro that hold the carry handles together started to come off, and a needle and dental floss took permanent care of that.

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from jeepsandguns wrote 18 weeks 1 day ago

Good ideas for my range bag. Right now my range bag bears the name Simulac. Just enough room to be a pistol range bag and I can't think of anyone who would steal a bag with a baby formula name on it. The rifle range bag is an ammo box but you have inspired me to buy more stuff now. Thanks DEP. Although I tend to carry masking tape rather than staples. I can run out of staples and not know til it's too late but an empty tape roll can be spotted a mile away. As for our local range, always plenty of room except during sight in days and when various ranges are closed for classes or law enforcement training.

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from hutter wrote 18 weeks 1 day ago

Besides everything I've read above I always have a bag of balloons. On a breezy day these are fun to let go and shoot at. Also an old toothbrush because this damn Taurus 941 .22 mag leaves so much unburned power behind I have to brush under the star so I can close the cylinder. Small mag-light flashlight.

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from Steve in Virginia wrote 17 weeks 4 days ago

Dave -- you could write an entire article just on the accumulation of stuff, the need to organize the stuff as you accumulate it, and something to help you remember the stuff that you've accumlated. I love stuff, which may be one of the reasons I gravited to the outdoors.

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from T.W. Davidson wrote 18 weeks 4 days ago

"Homo heidelbergensis," I gather, refers to a probable but extinct sub-species of modern man. (Let us all hope we are evolved beyond this, or that we soon do, for otherwise we will surely suffer the same fate.)

When I first read this blog entry, I thought you (Mr. Petzal), being astute, educated and refined, were referring to Heisenberg and his Uncertainty Principle. Heisenberg meant his Principle to apply to the movement and location of sub-atomic particles--like quarks. However, and in my opinion, the Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle applies equally to the world of shooting, including Stuff you put (or don't) in a range bag and take to the range.

In its original form, and as applied to the world of quantum mechanics, the Uncertainty Principle holds that while we may be able to determine the location of a sub-atomic particle, if so we will not be able to determine its speed or direction. Contra, if we are able to determine the speed and direction of a sub-atomic particle, we will not be able to determine its location at a given point in time.

Applied to shooting, while we may know the exact location of a given cartridge--in the chamber of our best rifle--we may never know exactly the speed or direction of its bullet when we pull the trigger. A good predictable guess, surely yes, but exactitude, no. (Notice the target or deer or elk you've just inexplicably missed with the handload you sent six months developing.)

Contra, via the chronograph and the paper target, we can determine the speed and direction of our bullet, but never its exact location at a given point of time during its trajectory. (Notice the perfect bullseye hole in the target, yet you pulled the shot and you know you pulled the shot and you would have confidentally bet $20 before looking that you seriously missed the bullseye.)

As to range bags and the Stuff we put (or don't) in them, the Uncertainty Principle is alive and well. Applied thusly, it works as follows:

1. If you put everything you could possibly need into a range bag, two beyond-a-reasonable-doubt probabilities will then unfold and secretly lie in wait for you in the hours to come: (A) you will forget the bag at home; or (B) at the range, and when a problem occurs, you will not be able to find (in the bag) the one thing you absolutely need to solve the problem--even though, yes, that thing is somewhere in the bag, because an hour earlier you just put it there, and your kids and wife and dog and shooting partner saw you do it.

2. If you put into the bag only what you are positive you will need at the range, once you get to the range you will soon absolutely need the one thing you really didn't put in the bag . . . and no one else at the range has it either.

The Uncertainty Principle--The Shooter's Version

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Ontario Honker ... wrote 18 weeks 4 days ago

I'm not a range sort of person but I do have to sight in my rifle once a year. Or rather I did back in the days when I was big game hunting. Everyone is encouraging me to take it up again. Actually giving it some thought too. I wind up gutting everyone else's deer every year so maybe if I do the shooting they'll do the dirty work for a change.

Anyway, this seems to be a very sensible list! I would add toilet paper to my bag as the "range" I usually use is an old gravel pit out in the middle of nowhere. I almost never carry TP with me when hunting but I rarely eat so it's usually not an issue. However, for some reason sighting in my rifle seems to rattle the sh*t out of me. I don't own a Leatherman and my lovely late wife who always seemed to know exactly what to stick in my Christmas stocking seemed to always overlook them when picking out gifts. Now that baby Parker is here my daughter says we have to have Christmas again so maybe I should drop the hint. How does one do that?

I digress. As usual. I would add to this list sticky dots. It's better to cover up the bullet holes in the unlikely (but it seems unusually common) event that one round lands exactly where another one already passed through. Simply marking the previous bullet hole with an X won't help. I have found that the peel off dots are better than the lick-and-stick ones. The latter often tend to fall off the target. Trying to tear off little chunks of duct tape would be time and fingernail consuming.

What is an "empty chamber indicator"?

As to bug dope, up here there is nothing for it but to wait till cool fall days before sighting in guns. The bugs are so thick during the summer they would significantly deflect the course of a .458 Win at even fifty yards.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Ontario Honker ... wrote 18 weeks 4 days ago

I lost my el-cheapo dog whistle when I was hunting this fall. That dime store whistle was no loss but I sure felt bad about losing the braided lanyard. Anyway ... I was advised to go to a local sports supply store and pick up a replacement. Good advice! Whistles for referees are what you want. Cost five or six bucks but well worth it. No marbles inside to fall apart or dissolve, the spit drains out the bottom (unless it's minus twenty!), they are sturdy plastic rather than metal that'll freeze to the lips, and the sound is shrill enough to be heard a country mile.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Happy Myles wrote 18 weeks 4 days ago

My range bag is a 50 year old Gokeys faded green canvas with leather trim. My list is similar to,David's with a couple additions. Where is your rifle rest and bag for the toe of your rifle butt.? I also have three six inch pieces of 2x4 to raise heavy caliber rifles on my rest. I can handle the huge recoil better if I am a little higher behind the stock. Brownell"s. sells a selection of gun screws which I keep in my bag. I will be at the range tomorrow.

Anyone going to Dallas Safari Club Convention.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from RJ Arena wrote 18 weeks 3 days ago

I did not see on your list Eye protection, a must, and for us old fogies, readers so we can use those tools or read boxes of ammo. While I am on the vision kick, lens cleaner for the glasses and the scope. I also like a gun rag to wipe everything down with before leaving the range, things can happen before you get a chance to properly clean your toys.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Happy Myles wrote 18 weeks 3 days ago

Just curious. How crowded are your ranges these days? Most of the Southern California ranges have closed. Therefore, the few left get pretty busy. The one I have been going to for decades has gone from a scattered number of shooters to several hundred on weekends. I only go on week days since retiring. Most folks are pounding away with military type firearms. Serious hunters are few, and far between.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Trap12 wrote 18 weeks 3 days ago

If you don't bring CLP or some kind of lubricant to the range, you may end up using your space pen and waterproof pad to write yourself a reminder not to forget it again after your weapon locks up.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Tim Platt wrote 18 weeks 3 days ago

I forgot I now always carry a can of Hoppe's Blast & Shine. If you have problems at the range it is a godsend.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from RockySquirrel wrote 18 weeks 3 days ago

Lets add to the list: Your older Binoculars (spotting scope on 100 yard seems to be over kill), extra targets (I print my own on a laser printer), Sticky dots or peel off dots as Honker recommended. Masking tape (sometimes you run out of staples), CLP, BULL BAG is a fantastic add in. See (www(dot).Bullsbag(dot)com). Some extra sandbags. A fine metal file for the sites on un-scoped non-adjustable guns (yes there still are a few). 1 gal plastic freezer bag to take your brass home. One of each size if you don’t want to sort later. A pair of heavy leather work gloves has come in handy a time or 2. Occasionally a range finder. Not every range is accurate. Bottled water is a must have. Hat and sun screen if you are going to be there for a while. Trash bag.

Shooting a muzzleloader has it s own set of tools. Rod and jag for 50 cal. cleaning patches, lube, one of those co2 muzzleloader bullet expellers. C02 cartridges. Extra powder and measure.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Happy Myles wrote 18 weeks 2 days ago

I always keep a few orange dots in my wallet for targets, surprising how easy they make sighting in around the world.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from davidpetzal wrote 18 weeks 3 days ago

To Ontario Honker: An ECI, or Empty Chamber Indicator, is an L-shaped piece of plastic that's used to show that the chamber is empty and that the bolt is open. It's used at rifle matches and some enlightened ranges. When "Cease fire" is called, you pull the bolt back, insert the long end of the L up the barrel and let the bolt close on the short end of the L, which protrudes from the action. This way, anyone who looks at it will know that your rifle is safe, especially the range officer, who will remind you nicely if don't pop in your ECI. If you don't do it a second time, he will ask you nicely to pack up your stuff and leave.

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from crm3006 wrote 18 weeks 3 days ago

I can carry all of my range gear in the back of a 250 Super Duty. Range bags would not carry my ammo.
Happy Myles-our range is a membership club that requires proof of NRA membership. I understand there is a waiting list. I usually find several shooters on the bench rest and long distance ranges every time I manage to get out there.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Tim Platt wrote 18 weeks 3 days ago

vj9ruAdd an 18" 6X6 for the fore end and 4X4 for the rear plus some 50 pound sand bags. I like my rifles up high too, and a Leupold lenspen.

No range master at my range. Only a bunch of rednecks who scream hot and cold whenever they want to walk to their targets. Thumbtacks are a must, and extra ear plugs to pass out to newbies. I use a green canvas bag that is about 2' X 18" X 10" with a leather shoulder strap. My wife swears is was her suitcase once upon a time but I am sure she must be mistaken. It has been full of ammo and earplugs and magazines and tools since I can remember, which is not long.

My range has been extremely slow for over a year, thank God. It used to be free because it is on a Wildlife Management Area and the wildlife officer who lived there just kind of took care of it but now they charge $5.50 for three hours so people just shoot in their own back yards. Not hard to do in Tennessee. Plus now they do a background check and if a felon shows up to buy a range permit they confiscate his weapons and vehicle... great policy!

And yes in the last 5 years the range has been flooded with black rifles owned by idiots who have no concept of the rules of the range or gun safety in general. They can't even get on paper at 100 yards with sandbags and I shoot a little 10/22 and blow up clay pigeons 10 in a row with 10 shots at the same distance. When they see my targets they are amazed. It really pisses them off when I shoot my AR offhand looking through the carry handle and hit the clay pigeons one right after the other.

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from Mark-1 wrote 18 weeks 3 days ago

DP, Yours is a short list compared to what a black powder rifle shooter needs & takes to the range.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from WA Mtnhunter wrote 18 weeks 3 days ago

Happy Myles,

No DSC this year. Waterfowl hunting has been poor so far this year and the big black dawg threatened me if I went off anywhere other than goose hunting between now and January 26th....

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from jhjimbo wrote 18 weeks 3 days ago

The Club has about 400 members and I go during the week and am usually the only one there. There are several ranges from 100 to 300yd rifle and also 6 separate pistol ranges.
My gear includes a few other things. I have cleaning supplies, solvent and oil with me. A boat cushion as most of the seats on the benches are too low for me. A shoulder pad for recoil and recoil gloves for handguns. Spotting scope with tripod. Extra battery for chronograph. Hearing protection. Screwdriver with assorted tips. Ammo is carried in another box and all shells are returned to the box they came from. We are required to pick up all brass. Reload data collection is important to me so I have notebooks for that. I used to load 3000 to 4000 rounds a year but that has been cut back some lately. I do like to experiment with various loads in various rifles. Always take several rifles so some are in the cooling rack as I am shooting others.

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from kudukid wrote 18 weeks 3 days ago

Happy Myles:

Is Kalifornia still part of America? Rhode Island left years ago to join the Soviet Union...

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from 1uglymutha wrote 18 weeks 3 days ago

I am fortunate to live in a shooter's paradise (western Colorado). Un-crowded ranges most weekday mornings except right before hunting season (my range work is always done by then). And there's always the desert where I utilize a very sturdy shooting bench (homemade) or a shooting mat and bipod.There is plenty of space and time for lots of field position shooting as well. A good rangefinder allows shooting at any distance with plenty of large mountains to use as backstops. Living in the Rocky Mountain west has huge advantages for hunters and shooters. All we need now is more ammo and reloading components.

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from kudukid wrote 18 weeks 3 days ago

To 1uglymutha:

What you need in Colorado right now is a whole lot more recall referendums!

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from 5280Shooter wrote 18 weeks 2 days ago

DEP: My range bag is from Red Oxx Mfg in Montana and they make super tough soft sided bags. Believe the owner learned his craft sewing parachutes for the Army Rangers. And, because I am not the Omnipotent Godfather of Guns and Gear, my name is not on the bag. The only things I would add to the list are a small 6" ruler so I can get a quick evalution of group sizes, a microfiber cloth to clean my scope lenses and my front and rear Protektor leather rests. They are outstanding.
Happy: The public range in my area is very busy but the average shooter is much different than years past. Mostly handgun and semi-auto rifles these days. When I'm shooting, my rifle is likely the only bolt gun on the line.

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from RS08 wrote 18 weeks 2 days ago

Ontario honker, sticky dots are a great idea. here all these years I've been thinking I'm off paper after the first shot, when I've been shooting one hole groups ;).

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from deadeyedick wrote 18 weeks 2 days ago

I'm one of those guys that takes everything but the kitchen sink. I really don't like to go to the range then remember someting I need better to take it with you and not needed it than to find out you need and not have it. I would add just one item to your list and that is; a pound of coomon sense and a big spoon

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from deadeyedick wrote 18 weeks 2 days ago

I'm one of those guys that takes everything but the kitchen sink. I really don't like to go to the range then remember someting I need better to take it with you and not needed it than to find out you need and not have it. I would add just one item to your list and that is; a pound of coomon sense and a big spoon

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from tunadave wrote 18 weeks 1 day ago

Also check out the range bags from MidwayUSA. I bought their "large one" several years ago, and it's been great. More pockets than Captain Kangaroo, and they are all padded. It's become my favorite carry-on for airlines as well. Just the right size, easy to carry, and tough. If you know how to pack, you can get an impressive amount of gear in there, including your hygiene kit. The only problem I had with it was one of the pieces of velcro that hold the carry handles together started to come off, and a needle and dental floss took permanent care of that.

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from jeepsandguns wrote 18 weeks 1 day ago

Good ideas for my range bag. Right now my range bag bears the name Simulac. Just enough room to be a pistol range bag and I can't think of anyone who would steal a bag with a baby formula name on it. The rifle range bag is an ammo box but you have inspired me to buy more stuff now. Thanks DEP. Although I tend to carry masking tape rather than staples. I can run out of staples and not know til it's too late but an empty tape roll can be spotted a mile away. As for our local range, always plenty of room except during sight in days and when various ranges are closed for classes or law enforcement training.

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from hutter wrote 18 weeks 1 day ago

Besides everything I've read above I always have a bag of balloons. On a breezy day these are fun to let go and shoot at. Also an old toothbrush because this damn Taurus 941 .22 mag leaves so much unburned power behind I have to brush under the star so I can close the cylinder. Small mag-light flashlight.

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from Steve in Virginia wrote 17 weeks 4 days ago

Dave -- you could write an entire article just on the accumulation of stuff, the need to organize the stuff as you accumulate it, and something to help you remember the stuff that you've accumlated. I love stuff, which may be one of the reasons I gravited to the outdoors.

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