Please Sign In

Please enter a valid username and password
  • Log in with Facebook
» Not a member? Take a moment to register
» Forgot Username or Password

Why Register?
Signing up could earn you gear (click here to learn how)! It also keeps offensive content off our site.

I Wrote What?

Recent Comments

Categories

Recent Posts

Archives

Syndicate

Google Reader or Homepage
Add to My Yahoo!
Add to My AOL

The Gun Nuts
in your Inbox

Enter your email address to get our new post everyday.

December 17, 2013

I Wrote What?

By David E. Petzal

In 1969, Ed Zern wrote this sentence as a lead to an Exit, Laughing column: “Lacking the low animal cunning necessary for a career in law or politics, I decided to become a writer.” I considered the sentence to be a work of genius, and when I first met Ed shortly thereafter, I quoted it to him, and told him how highly I thought of it.

He looked at me blankly, as though I had quoted Louisa May Alcott, George Gissing, or Helen Gurley Brown. He had absolutely no idea what I was talking about, and I slunk off like a whipped dog.

Ed tended to be forgetful, which may account in part for his not remembering, but I think it was due more to the fact that, at that point, he had done Exit, Laughing for 11 years, and reams of other writing, and was so focused on what he was going to have to produce in the future that he had no brain cells left for retaining what he had already done.

This is the case with me. I have a phenomenal memory (in fact, my head is packed with more useless, obscure information than anyone I know except Tom McIntyre — I hope Tom donates his brain to science; it must contain a hippocampus the size of a grapefruit), but I can’t remember what I wrote even recently. When people quote my old stuff I’m hugely flattered, but also completely baffled.

I mention this because the SHOT Show is coming up, and sometimes it happens there. Assuming I can even hear the person above the din, I will apologize, explain the situation, and give them a smart rap with a small Zulu knobkerrie which I carry for such occasions. Then I will wander off, worried that I will blunder into a fart cloud and lose my vision, parts of the SHOT Show being poorly ventilated.

Comments (59)

Top Rated
All Comments
from Happy Myles wrote 17 weeks 3 days ago

Is this directed at me for writing vivacious when I meaa

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Happy Myles wrote 17 weeks 3 days ago

Meant to write viscous? Have met Helen Gurley Brown and been lost at SHOT Snow

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Happy Myles wrote 17 weeks 3 days ago

I mean Show

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Happy Myles wrote 17 weeks 3 days ago

I mean ...oh well

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from haverodwilltravel wrote 17 weeks 3 days ago

Dave, this is why great outdoor writers should still smoke pipes.
I remember as a youth fawning all over them at outdoor shows (back when one could still play with a pipe indoors).
I'd gush the quote or remind them of a technique they had written about and they would pause...give a thoughtful look and play with the pipe while their mind raced only to place their hand on my shoulder and say. "Son...I'm glad you enjoyed it." "Next!"
Try it...even if you only have to rent a Dunhill for the day. :)

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Harold wrote 17 weeks 3 days ago

I guess, if I read you "write", you're saying that you've forgotten more than most people know. ;)

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from BAM wrote 17 weeks 3 days ago

Hippocampus and fart cloud in the same article. Well done sir.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from WA Mtnhunter wrote 17 weeks 3 days ago

I think Happy wandered into a viscous fart cloud! Still early out here on the Left Coast! LOL

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from RJ Arena wrote 17 weeks 3 days ago

I have worked with the public my whole life, mostly in the retail industry, and I will run into one of my customers, all most anywhere, and they will start a conversation, and I have no idea who they are. the only thing that ever saves me is to try to get them to talk about how I had assisted them in the past, then it all comes back, every detail. Funny how that works.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Double D wrote 17 weeks 3 days ago

I once watched Jeopardy sitting next to Tom McIntyre in a bar in Cheyenne, Wyoming. The speed at which he rattled off the correct answers was amazing.

Also, I have already forgotten what I wrote yesterday, yet can vividly remember the face of every pretty girl I've ever met. I think our brain chooses what's important and what is not.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from tootall75 wrote 17 weeks 3 days ago

I keep all of my back issues of Field & Stream and reread all of the articles from time to time...so if I ever do meet you David (which would be awesome btw) I promise not to ambush you by quoting you and expecting you to remember (although you have had some doozies, the aformentioned rap with a club, stick or knobkerrie comes up quite often so you are apt to remember that). I would however try to convince you to maybe cross the border to New Brunswick when you visit Maine every November and check out the deer hutning we have. Much like Maine, not a ton of deer in some of the remote areas, but some beautiful big woods and big bucks.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Douglas wrote 17 weeks 3 days ago

All I can say is that my mind is like a steel trap.
One that's been left in the water too long.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from NHshtr wrote 17 weeks 3 days ago

DEP, It appears that you've reached the stage where you can discard pearls of wisdom and walk off unaware of us minions behind you scooping them up.

If I meet you at the SHOT show, I'll politely not mention anything you've written!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Amflyer wrote 17 weeks 3 days ago

Happy,

Depending on what the situation may be:

1. Start drinking later in the day.
2. Stop drinking earlier in the night.
3. Don't type and fly single-prop aircraft.
4. It's never a good idea to post from the bathtub.
5. If you not in the bathtub alone, put the danged computer aside. You can post in a few minutes.
6. If you're having a seizure, have your wife call 911.
7. If you're having a seizure in the bathtub, have your wife throw in the laundry and some soap.
8. If you're involved in a search and seizure, call a lawyer.
9. If you or your wife are lawyers, get out of the tub and call a psychiatrist.
10. Where was this going, again?

+8 Good Comment? | | Report
from 1uglymutha wrote 17 weeks 3 days ago

A well turned phrase is a joy forever. That's one reason I enjoy this blog. Petzal seems to exhale these little gems with every breath. As does Happy Myles.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from davidpetzal wrote 17 weeks 3 days ago

To tootall 75. I hunted in New Brunswick for either three or four years just after the turn of the century (21st, not 20th) and enjoyed it hugely.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Ontario Honker ... wrote 17 weeks 3 days ago

Haven't been to a SHOT show and doubt I ever will. I don't care for crowds. The local gun shows are about as much as I can bear. Even in the old days when it was okay for the foolishly addicted to smoke in those venues I didn't find it at all stifling. A lot of hot air moving all the time keeps things well-ventilated. :-)

-1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Bernie wrote 17 weeks 3 days ago

Mr. Petzal,

Speaking of past writings, I still remember a piece that you wrote where you mentioned that your white hunter discouraged having a sling on your rifle while hunting dangerous game. In your own inimitable style, you said that you later sat in a theater and watched a famous actor (Brad Pitt?) outrun an African lion, causing you to start snorting and braying like a jackass. Then a young person turned and said, "Like, could you hold it down, man? Like..."

The entire piece was hilarious and I wish I had saved it!

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from tootall75 wrote 17 weeks 3 days ago

Thanks for the response DEP, I had no idea you had hunted in NB, very cool. What part of the province did you hunt and for what game animal? A lot of Americans come for moose and black bear (not sure about whitetail) although the number of people who come for black bear has been dwindling over the past few years which is too bad as the population is growing all the time. We also have some great grouse hunting, they always seems to be plentiful and some are dumb as s**t so they make for easy targets.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Bernie wrote 17 weeks 3 days ago

Mr. Petzal,

Speaking of past writings, I still remember a piece that you wrote where you mentioned that your white hunter discouraged having a sling on your rifle while hunting dangerous game. In your own inimitable style, you said that you later sat in a theater and watched a famous actor (Brad Pitt?) outrun an African lion, causing you to start snorting and braying like a jackass. Then a young person turned and said, "Like, could you hold it down, man? Like..."

The entire piece was hilarious and I wish I had saved it!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from davidpetzal wrote 17 weeks 3 days ago

To tootall 75: We were after whitetails, and I don't remember exactly where we were, but it was near the coast, not terribly far from the Bay of Fundy, because we drove there one afternoon to watch the tide come in. I hunted with a Micmac Indian named Louis Ward, who was one of the nicer guys I've run into, and he worried about me constantly.

To Bernie: It was The Ghost and the Darkness, 1996, Michael Douglas and Val Kilmer, the supposed story of the Tsavo man-eaters, and one of the dopier movies about hunting I've seen.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from O Garcia wrote 17 weeks 3 days ago

I remember The Ghost and The Darkness. Totally undone by Michael Douglas' character, the very kind of over-the-top white hunter (filthy, ragged clothes, hat adorned with various teeth and claws, etc.) that Jim C. warned his readers not to get near to. And also by historical inaccuracies, Col. John Patterson did not hire a pro hunter. The movie also used Africans instead of Indians as railworkers, probably (I'm guessing) stemming from the unfamiliarity by the screenwriters with what the British meant by "blacks". To the British in the colonial era, black refers to both Africans and Indians. The powerful worker who gets dragged by the lion at night was an "enormous Sikh". The lions were also unmaned males, but a maned lion looks better on a movie screen

The best part of that movie was the Lee Speed rifle Val Kilmer (Patterson) used to kill the first lion (not part of the pair who became known as "the maneaters of Tsavo"). It is the best example of what the British gunmakers can do to the ugly Lee rifle when they decide to sporterize it.

Dave, surely you remember the names Old Thunderdent and Maersey Dotes? I love that horse article, I still grin when I read it, to the puzzlement of my friends.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Mark-1 wrote 17 weeks 2 days ago

I saved your 1-31-2013 blog: Governor Cuomo’s Game of Chicken...NY SAFE Act. I saw it prophetic, and so it has come to be.

As I write the State Police Head Honcho admits between 400 and 2800 registrations of contraband assault rifles...at best.

"I wrote What?" INDEED!!!

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from RockySquirrel wrote 17 weeks 2 days ago

I can remember 1 particularly funny EXIT LAUGHING when I was in short pants.

HOW TO FLY TIES.

Ed Zern was a comic genius to a 10 year old, who got his F&S and Outdoor Life from the waiting area at the office his Mother worked in. Did I remember reading that Zern was a college professor?

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from tootall75 wrote 17 weeks 2 days ago

Hey DEP, thank you for responding once again; sounds like you were in the Southwestern part of the province in the St. John River Valley. There are lots of deer there (too many for the folks in resisdential areas, my buddy is always sending me pics of deer in his backyard, impossible to plant a garden or flowers). The Fundy coast is quite picturesque is it not? Highest tides in the world and they claim some huge whitetails in the moutains although you will have to work to get them. On a side note, I mentioned in another post that I was reading the Field & Stream Rifle Guide and I finished it, great read and full of some great info, I have recommended to many of my friends. Thanks again for responding, my son (who is 10 and a budding gun nut) marvels (and thinks it's kind of cool as do I) that you, a nationally acclaimed writer, would respond to the likes of me. In any case, I wish you and yours a Merry Christmas and Happy New Year.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Pray- hunt-work wrote 17 weeks 2 days ago

Happy- I suppose a viscous recoil is better than a viscous fart cloud. However a viscous fart is rarely a fart and often the only thing left clouded is your knickers. As for the vivacious recoil, I had too much to drink the evening I read it and I found it to be hilarious and depicting. What I'm getting at is, well, I think you were meaning to write about a VICIOUS recoil.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from tootall75 wrote 17 weeks 2 days ago

Pray-hunt-work...hahahaha...vicious fart cloud..sounds like you have been to our deer camp...not enough vicious recoil and way too many vicious fart clouds around the card table...part of camp life I suppose. Thanks for the laugh....

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from davidpetzal wrote 17 weeks 2 days ago

To O Garcia: I most certainly do remember Old Thunderdent and Mairsey Doates. I won a prize for that article, as I recall.

To Rocky Squirrel: Ed Zern taught English at a major eastern university for, I believe, one year. When I asked him why only a year, he said the students were too stupid to learn anything. Ed, by the way, had the best alibi for late copy that I ever heard. Once, when I asked him where his column was, he said: "I can't talk now. The ape bit my daughter." And it was the truth; some kind of primate that he was boarding for a friend did bite his daughter.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from wittsec wrote 17 weeks 2 days ago

The one writer that probably remembers every word that he ever wrote and is the one most in need of being able to forget is Bill Heavey. I love his writing.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from tom warner wrote 17 weeks 2 days ago

Tootall75: I will echo your enthusiasm for New Brunswick deer hunting since I hunted in your province for years back in the early 80's on and again during the 90's. I did all my hunting in the general area of Fosterville and North Lake just across the border from Orient, Maine with a man who has become a very good friend of mine, Edward Fredericks, a remarkable guy. Just spoke with him a couple of days ago. I did take one hunt near Fundy with a very well known guide and got a decent buck there, but took home some VERY big bucks from around Fosterville, one of them one inch short of "the book". I will say that it took some very serious effort however, often hunting for the entire season from dawn 'till dark. I loved hunting in your province but was saddened by the amount of logging that took place during the years I hunted there. Much of the forest that I hunted vanished over those years. I have now become an old fart and no longer go, but I enjoyed hunting in NB as much as any place that I can recall. I miss it and recommend it to any serious big buck nut willing to put in the effort.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from WA Mtnhunter wrote 17 weeks 2 days ago

I believe Jeff Foxworthy summed it up, "You don't have to make this stuff up, you just have to write it down.", or words to that effect...

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from tootall75 wrote 17 weeks 2 days ago

Tom Warner, nice to hear someone else who has enjoyed the deer hunting here. I was born and raised (and still live) in NB and I can echo your sentiment about logging. The area I hunt in (Salmon River) still has some great hunting and vast tracts of big woods but extensive logging began in the late 80's which severely affected the deer population and ruined some great whitetail hot spots. The elder guys in our deer camp talk about the 70's and 80's before logging roads existed and the place was a whitetail nirvana. The camp log book details story of season past and the success rate was staggering..one entry list 13 guys at camp and 9...9 of then tagged a deer!!! It is slowly starting to grow up and the deer are making a comeback and we have our own stands in remote areas where you would have to actually leave the road to find (lot of Hollywood hunters). All in all I love the place and hopefully will be able to enjoy it for many years to come...Happy Holidays.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Happy Myles wrote 17 weeks 2 days ago

I did mean to write vicious, but the computer kicked out vivacious and I liked it so well I left it in. I did know Helen Gurley Brown, and did get lost at SHOT Show.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Tim Platt wrote 17 weeks 2 days ago

Happy, would vivacious or vicious more aptly describe Ms. Brown? My sister was a big Cosmo reader and I always wondered about the editor-in-chief...

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Safado wrote 17 weeks 2 days ago

Mr. Petzal,
I was fully prepared, if ever our paths crossed, to regale you on such tales as “The Wire” and the “Cowboy Way” or the blogs about how “Hard Hearts Kill” or whether we are as “Tough as our Fathers” or “Guilty of being armed while stupid”. I was a bit disappointed that someone could write such inspired tales or turn a phrase like none other yet not remember writing it. But considering that you have endured vivacious recoil, mule kicks, grizzly charges and fart clouds of epic proportions, memory loss is an acceptable side effect of a life well lived.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from MReeder wrote 17 weeks 2 days ago

Know exactly what DEP means. I can't hold a candle to his output, but over the past 30 years I've turned out enough news copy, political speeches, ad copy, personal/outdoor columns and sports copy to denude at least a small tree lot; if not a forest. Most of the news stuff was pretty mundane and forgettable by its very nature and I'm pretty sure I wrote about half of it in my sleep. There were a few times when I warmed to the subject, the sun and moon aligned and something I wrote wasn't complete gibberish; and I have a vague recollection of what I wrote. Mostly, I couldn't tell you what I put to paper three days ago. Right now it's mostly high school sports coverage and I'm faced every week with some parent quoting something back at me that might as well be in Lithuanian for all I can recall about it.
Turning to DEP's other main topic of conversation, what kind of food do they serve at that Shot Show? Fried beans on a stick? I've encountered a few noxious bursts myself at a couple of outdoor shows here in San Antonio, but nothing to match the green clouds that seem to be lurking behind every booth in Vegas. Could it have anything to do with the proximity of Area 51? Swamp gas, perhaps?

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Trap12 wrote 17 weeks 2 days ago

My adult children tell me from time to time about some profound lesson they learned from me while growing up. Invariably, I have no recollection of these instances, but I have to conclude that the young me was exceedingly wise and astute.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from edalweber wrote 17 weeks 2 days ago

Before Ed Zern started writing his column, he did ads for Nash cars which appeared in Field and Stream.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Proverbs wrote 17 weeks 2 days ago

From a well-known outdoors writer's work from the early 1980s I picked up some advice that has served me well for years: In most any social situation, you can get the upper hand by smoking a pipe, and alternating between quiet chuckles and looks of bemusement. Anyone know the source?

To NHshtr: Be careful when scooping up behind someone. Are you sure those are pearls?

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Proverbs wrote 17 weeks 2 days ago

From a well-known outdoors writer's work from the early 1980s I picked up some advice that has served me well for years: In most any social situation, you can get the upper hand by smoking a pipe, and alternating between quiet chuckles and looks of bemusement. Anyone know the source?

To NHshtr: Be careful when scooping up behind someone. Are you sure those are pearls?

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from MReeder wrote 17 weeks 2 days ago

To DEP & O. Garcia, re. "Ghost in the Darkness."
Agree with many of your points, but still have to defend the movie. The Douglas character was not only fictional; he was entirely superfluous and robbed Patterson of the credit for what he ultimately accomplished, by himself, in his blundering but determined way. And, yes, the real lions were indeed maneless. Tsavo is a thorny place.
However, there was a lot about that movie to like as well. The Lee Speed was certainly one of them. Also, it was one of the few movies that did not treat the very notion of hunting as some kind of mental derangement.
As for outrunning one of the lions, you need to take that up with Patterson. Obviously no human could get away from a determined charge but Patterson himself described how he barely beat the second one to a tree and scrambled up just out of his reach, shortly before he ended up killing him from only a few feet away. The incident with the owl in the machan also happened, although Patterson was not knocked from his perch. The famous "contraption" and the way the lion escaped it also came directly from Patterson's own account. He also found a lair filled with human bones and trinkets, although that followed, rather than preceded, the killing of the lions. Many other memorable scenes are also at least inspired by Patterson's account, if not precisely replicated.
And, while most of the victims were Africans, the Lunatic Line did employ Indian coolies. Patterson numbers 28 of them as lion victims. The first recorded victim was Ungan Singh, a man Patterson describes as "a powerful Sikh." He was plucked from the middle of a group of workers sleeping in one tent and dragged out, screaming the whole time; then devoured some distance away. Patterson graphically describes the gore he subsequently found, including the mostly intact head, with "eyes staring wide open with a horrified, startled look to them." He called it "the most gruesome sight I had ever seen." Pretty much exactly as depicted in the film.
The Indians in camp were a mixture of Hindus and Moslems who fought among themselves and at one point plotted to kill Patterson; albeit not in the way portrayed in the movie. They may well have also been at least partially responsible for the man-eating. With thousands of men working on the line, some inevitably died of injury and illness. When they did, the Indians evidently threw the bodies in the brush rather than burying them. Kind of like a human buffet table.
In any event, the lions were both large, healthy and as might be expected, fat. Bottomline, the movie got as many things right as it did wrong and it was a whooping good adventure. It was also not the first time Hollywood had dealt with the Tsavo lions. If you want to see some really bad movie making, check out some of the earlier versions, including "Killers of Kilimanjaro" and "Bwana Devil." The latter is not just bad; it is epically awful.
Finally, if anyone has not read The Man-Eaters of Tsavo," you are missing a treat. The writing is a bit stilted, but Patterson still weaves an amazing tale.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from nelsol wrote 17 weeks 2 days ago

Great post DEP. I'm sure when you wrote "fart cloud" you were actually meaning "dense cloud of foul flatulence".
As we get longer in the tooth much evades us with regard to short term memory, at least that's my excuse. Oh well, "I may not be smart, but I sure am slow" (author unknown).

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from tom warner wrote 17 weeks 2 days ago

Tootall75: I just recalled the name of the man that I hunted with near your area back around 10-12 years or so: George Chase, a helluva nice guy. As I remember, George was a former champion rifle shooter for Canada or NB some years back and quite a man. He sent me a photo (last year I think) of a great buck that he had just bow-killed. I also think that George had published or edited the book "Big Bucks of New Brunswick", something that I spent significant time drooling over. George also has monkey genes I think, because he could quickly clamber up and down stratospherically high trees up to tiny little strap-on stands that gave me acrophobia just to gaze up at, never mind when I actually looked down through the clouds from. He would even hang a little hammock up there to relax in. Chicken livered coward that I am I could never bring myself to get into one of those! Anyway, I killed a nice buck with George; maybe 'cause I wanted to get it over with and avoid venturing up to those stands-in-the-sky each day. Nice country.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Doug Schwartz wrote 17 weeks 2 days ago

Like I said to my editor a couple of years ago, "Thanks for making me a more better writer". She was not amused.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from focusfront wrote 17 weeks 2 days ago

Davidpetzal;
I think I would spell it "dopeyer," although nothing seems to work. As for the movie, I gave it credit for exactly two things; showing how fantastically dangerous real, live lions are and how necessary it was to kill the Maneaters of Tsavo. I would rather be chased by a hundred zombies than one healthy, hungry adult lion. When I read Patterson's book, it was scary in a way movies can't show well; him spending the night in a tree and coming down to see lion tracks all around the trunk, etc. As a writer, you are the last (and probably the wittiest) of a group that besides the names already mentioned included Carmichael, Cooper, Keith, Brister, Skelton, Nonte, and a couple of others. My favorite line of yours is, "Here is a list of things that scare horses; everything." I got a kick out of the way you compared the .338 to Rocky Marciano's name for his knockout punch (the old Suzy-Q) and the 7mm-08 to a nondescript looking soldier who knocked out an annoying street tough with one clout from his elbow. And so on. Keep writing.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from idahoelkandflyguy wrote 17 weeks 2 days ago

Hey Proverbs: That sounds a lot like Patrick McManus, the finest writer put out by home state.

Soooo.... what do I win?

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from idahoelkandflyguy wrote 17 weeks 2 days ago

And considering we lay claim to Jack O'Conner, Elmer Kieth and Ted True blood that is not faint praise.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from PanzerIV wrote 17 weeks 2 days ago

"worried that I will blunder into a fart cloud and lose my vision" -- snicker :- )

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from davidpetzal wrote 17 weeks 2 days ago

To focusfront: Those guys were all my heroes. Thank you kindly.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from JohnR wrote 17 weeks 2 days ago

Mr. Petzel, about that fart cloud; please be thankful if you're not a smoker as fart clouds are though to be very flammable. Of course the cloud generated by the previous evening's supper could possibly be inflammable too, the definition of which is counter intuitive as one would think that inflammable meant NOT flammable.
Unfortunately the intuitive people that decided that flammable and inflammable should mean the same thing, must have played with matches as children.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from ejpaul1 wrote 17 weeks 1 day ago

David Petzal is in my opinion the best gun writer alive. I am 39 and have been reading a lot of Jack O connor for some time and David is reminiscent of jack a bit. Dude, keep it coming, sarcasm blended with wit is a tractor beam for me.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from O Garcia wrote 17 weeks 1 day ago

MReeder,

I like Kilmer in that movie, it's the only one I've seen where he disappears into the Patterson character and I don't think "Val Kilmer, quirky actor" while watching. The Michael Douglas character was my main beef.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from MReeder wrote 17 weeks 1 day ago

O Garcia,
Agree Kilmer was excellent as Patterson. However, he was absolutely great as Doc Holliday in Tombstone. Also, one of the most historically accurate portrayals of Holliday anyone ever did. He just flat got it right. Total injustice he wasn't nominated for an Academy Award. He should have gotten one by acclamation.
No argument from me about the Douglas character in Ghost and the Darkness. My understanding is that Remington was supposed to have originally been a very small role, with the character representing one of the several hunters who drifted into Tsavo and tried their hand at the lions with no success. But after they got to Africa Douglas let his ego run away with him and expanded the part. He was exec producer and was writing the checks, so that was that. Really messed up an otherwise terrific movie. Kind of like what Jerry Jones has done with the Dallas Cowboys, for the same reasons...

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from O Garcia wrote 17 weeks 1 day ago

MReeder,

now I'm the one being forgetful. Of course, Tombstone. How can I forget?

I also forget the names of old classmates and former co-workers but remember their faces. When I meet them on the street, I make a "preemptive strike" and greet them first, so I don't have to ask "who are you again?"

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from MReeder wrote 17 weeks 1 day ago

O Garcia,
You and me both on the names and faces. Can't remember names to save my life. Only face I have trouble recognizing is the one in the mirror each morning, but I usually figure it out once I iron out the sags and wrinkles with soap and water and absorb a couple of cups of coffee...

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Mark-1 wrote 17 weeks 1 day ago

GeeWhiz: Have a copy of Patterson's book on Tsavo Man-eaters and its a good read for Victorian writing. Have to admit the book creeped me out. The Ghost and The Darkness were the names for Man-eater #1 and Man-eater #2. All photos of these lions creep me out. Almost saw both lions' stuffed remains in Chicago, but the crawling cork-screw feeling made me pass. Can't explain why, but it did.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from MReeder wrote 17 weeks 1 day ago

Mark-1,
We live in a day and age when most people's notion of horror is the fear that their 24-hour deodorant may wear off a few hours early. The idea that some animal would regard you as nothing more than a handy snack, and that you could end up as droppings left on a trail, is hard to contemplate and more than a little creepy. Rural Africans still live with that reality on a daily basis. Californians might want to compare notes with Tanzanians on that score, now that Golden State voters have banned all mountain lion hunting even as they build more and more homes in cougar country. He may be a slob compared to his African brethren, but old puma concolor still comes pretty well equipped with claw and fang...

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from Proverbs wrote 17 weeks 1 day ago

To idahoelkandflyguy: You are right about the author. Congratulations. You've just won the first copy of "Great Blogger Names & How To Abbreviate Them." Will be sent to you upon its publishing. Which will happen when it finds a publisher.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from idahoelkandflyguy wrote 17 weeks 7 hours ago

Proverbs: LOL. :) I will look forward to it. Maybe you should try the company that published "Great moments in deficit spending and socialized medicine"

0 Good Comment? | | Report

Post a Comment

from Amflyer wrote 17 weeks 3 days ago

Happy,

Depending on what the situation may be:

1. Start drinking later in the day.
2. Stop drinking earlier in the night.
3. Don't type and fly single-prop aircraft.
4. It's never a good idea to post from the bathtub.
5. If you not in the bathtub alone, put the danged computer aside. You can post in a few minutes.
6. If you're having a seizure, have your wife call 911.
7. If you're having a seizure in the bathtub, have your wife throw in the laundry and some soap.
8. If you're involved in a search and seizure, call a lawyer.
9. If you or your wife are lawyers, get out of the tub and call a psychiatrist.
10. Where was this going, again?

+8 Good Comment? | | Report
from BAM wrote 17 weeks 3 days ago

Hippocampus and fart cloud in the same article. Well done sir.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from WA Mtnhunter wrote 17 weeks 3 days ago

I think Happy wandered into a viscous fart cloud! Still early out here on the Left Coast! LOL

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from Mark-1 wrote 17 weeks 2 days ago

I saved your 1-31-2013 blog: Governor Cuomo’s Game of Chicken...NY SAFE Act. I saw it prophetic, and so it has come to be.

As I write the State Police Head Honcho admits between 400 and 2800 registrations of contraband assault rifles...at best.

"I wrote What?" INDEED!!!

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from MReeder wrote 17 weeks 1 day ago

Mark-1,
We live in a day and age when most people's notion of horror is the fear that their 24-hour deodorant may wear off a few hours early. The idea that some animal would regard you as nothing more than a handy snack, and that you could end up as droppings left on a trail, is hard to contemplate and more than a little creepy. Rural Africans still live with that reality on a daily basis. Californians might want to compare notes with Tanzanians on that score, now that Golden State voters have banned all mountain lion hunting even as they build more and more homes in cougar country. He may be a slob compared to his African brethren, but old puma concolor still comes pretty well equipped with claw and fang...

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from Happy Myles wrote 17 weeks 3 days ago

I mean ...oh well

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from haverodwilltravel wrote 17 weeks 3 days ago

Dave, this is why great outdoor writers should still smoke pipes.
I remember as a youth fawning all over them at outdoor shows (back when one could still play with a pipe indoors).
I'd gush the quote or remind them of a technique they had written about and they would pause...give a thoughtful look and play with the pipe while their mind raced only to place their hand on my shoulder and say. "Son...I'm glad you enjoyed it." "Next!"
Try it...even if you only have to rent a Dunhill for the day. :)

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from davidpetzal wrote 17 weeks 3 days ago

To tootall 75: We were after whitetails, and I don't remember exactly where we were, but it was near the coast, not terribly far from the Bay of Fundy, because we drove there one afternoon to watch the tide come in. I hunted with a Micmac Indian named Louis Ward, who was one of the nicer guys I've run into, and he worried about me constantly.

To Bernie: It was The Ghost and the Darkness, 1996, Michael Douglas and Val Kilmer, the supposed story of the Tsavo man-eaters, and one of the dopier movies about hunting I've seen.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from JohnR wrote 17 weeks 2 days ago

Mr. Petzel, about that fart cloud; please be thankful if you're not a smoker as fart clouds are though to be very flammable. Of course the cloud generated by the previous evening's supper could possibly be inflammable too, the definition of which is counter intuitive as one would think that inflammable meant NOT flammable.
Unfortunately the intuitive people that decided that flammable and inflammable should mean the same thing, must have played with matches as children.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Double D wrote 17 weeks 3 days ago

I once watched Jeopardy sitting next to Tom McIntyre in a bar in Cheyenne, Wyoming. The speed at which he rattled off the correct answers was amazing.

Also, I have already forgotten what I wrote yesterday, yet can vividly remember the face of every pretty girl I've ever met. I think our brain chooses what's important and what is not.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from 1uglymutha wrote 17 weeks 3 days ago

A well turned phrase is a joy forever. That's one reason I enjoy this blog. Petzal seems to exhale these little gems with every breath. As does Happy Myles.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Bernie wrote 17 weeks 3 days ago

Mr. Petzal,

Speaking of past writings, I still remember a piece that you wrote where you mentioned that your white hunter discouraged having a sling on your rifle while hunting dangerous game. In your own inimitable style, you said that you later sat in a theater and watched a famous actor (Brad Pitt?) outrun an African lion, causing you to start snorting and braying like a jackass. Then a young person turned and said, "Like, could you hold it down, man? Like..."

The entire piece was hilarious and I wish I had saved it!

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from O Garcia wrote 17 weeks 3 days ago

I remember The Ghost and The Darkness. Totally undone by Michael Douglas' character, the very kind of over-the-top white hunter (filthy, ragged clothes, hat adorned with various teeth and claws, etc.) that Jim C. warned his readers not to get near to. And also by historical inaccuracies, Col. John Patterson did not hire a pro hunter. The movie also used Africans instead of Indians as railworkers, probably (I'm guessing) stemming from the unfamiliarity by the screenwriters with what the British meant by "blacks". To the British in the colonial era, black refers to both Africans and Indians. The powerful worker who gets dragged by the lion at night was an "enormous Sikh". The lions were also unmaned males, but a maned lion looks better on a movie screen

The best part of that movie was the Lee Speed rifle Val Kilmer (Patterson) used to kill the first lion (not part of the pair who became known as "the maneaters of Tsavo"). It is the best example of what the British gunmakers can do to the ugly Lee rifle when they decide to sporterize it.

Dave, surely you remember the names Old Thunderdent and Maersey Dotes? I love that horse article, I still grin when I read it, to the puzzlement of my friends.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from RockySquirrel wrote 17 weeks 2 days ago

I can remember 1 particularly funny EXIT LAUGHING when I was in short pants.

HOW TO FLY TIES.

Ed Zern was a comic genius to a 10 year old, who got his F&S and Outdoor Life from the waiting area at the office his Mother worked in. Did I remember reading that Zern was a college professor?

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from WA Mtnhunter wrote 17 weeks 2 days ago

I believe Jeff Foxworthy summed it up, "You don't have to make this stuff up, you just have to write it down.", or words to that effect...

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Happy Myles wrote 17 weeks 2 days ago

I did mean to write vicious, but the computer kicked out vivacious and I liked it so well I left it in. I did know Helen Gurley Brown, and did get lost at SHOT Show.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Trap12 wrote 17 weeks 2 days ago

My adult children tell me from time to time about some profound lesson they learned from me while growing up. Invariably, I have no recollection of these instances, but I have to conclude that the young me was exceedingly wise and astute.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Proverbs wrote 17 weeks 2 days ago

From a well-known outdoors writer's work from the early 1980s I picked up some advice that has served me well for years: In most any social situation, you can get the upper hand by smoking a pipe, and alternating between quiet chuckles and looks of bemusement. Anyone know the source?

To NHshtr: Be careful when scooping up behind someone. Are you sure those are pearls?

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from MReeder wrote 17 weeks 2 days ago

To DEP & O. Garcia, re. "Ghost in the Darkness."
Agree with many of your points, but still have to defend the movie. The Douglas character was not only fictional; he was entirely superfluous and robbed Patterson of the credit for what he ultimately accomplished, by himself, in his blundering but determined way. And, yes, the real lions were indeed maneless. Tsavo is a thorny place.
However, there was a lot about that movie to like as well. The Lee Speed was certainly one of them. Also, it was one of the few movies that did not treat the very notion of hunting as some kind of mental derangement.
As for outrunning one of the lions, you need to take that up with Patterson. Obviously no human could get away from a determined charge but Patterson himself described how he barely beat the second one to a tree and scrambled up just out of his reach, shortly before he ended up killing him from only a few feet away. The incident with the owl in the machan also happened, although Patterson was not knocked from his perch. The famous "contraption" and the way the lion escaped it also came directly from Patterson's own account. He also found a lair filled with human bones and trinkets, although that followed, rather than preceded, the killing of the lions. Many other memorable scenes are also at least inspired by Patterson's account, if not precisely replicated.
And, while most of the victims were Africans, the Lunatic Line did employ Indian coolies. Patterson numbers 28 of them as lion victims. The first recorded victim was Ungan Singh, a man Patterson describes as "a powerful Sikh." He was plucked from the middle of a group of workers sleeping in one tent and dragged out, screaming the whole time; then devoured some distance away. Patterson graphically describes the gore he subsequently found, including the mostly intact head, with "eyes staring wide open with a horrified, startled look to them." He called it "the most gruesome sight I had ever seen." Pretty much exactly as depicted in the film.
The Indians in camp were a mixture of Hindus and Moslems who fought among themselves and at one point plotted to kill Patterson; albeit not in the way portrayed in the movie. They may well have also been at least partially responsible for the man-eating. With thousands of men working on the line, some inevitably died of injury and illness. When they did, the Indians evidently threw the bodies in the brush rather than burying them. Kind of like a human buffet table.
In any event, the lions were both large, healthy and as might be expected, fat. Bottomline, the movie got as many things right as it did wrong and it was a whooping good adventure. It was also not the first time Hollywood had dealt with the Tsavo lions. If you want to see some really bad movie making, check out some of the earlier versions, including "Killers of Kilimanjaro" and "Bwana Devil." The latter is not just bad; it is epically awful.
Finally, if anyone has not read The Man-Eaters of Tsavo," you are missing a treat. The writing is a bit stilted, but Patterson still weaves an amazing tale.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from idahoelkandflyguy wrote 17 weeks 2 days ago

Hey Proverbs: That sounds a lot like Patrick McManus, the finest writer put out by home state.

Soooo.... what do I win?

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from davidpetzal wrote 17 weeks 2 days ago

To focusfront: Those guys were all my heroes. Thank you kindly.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from MReeder wrote 17 weeks 1 day ago

O Garcia,
Agree Kilmer was excellent as Patterson. However, he was absolutely great as Doc Holliday in Tombstone. Also, one of the most historically accurate portrayals of Holliday anyone ever did. He just flat got it right. Total injustice he wasn't nominated for an Academy Award. He should have gotten one by acclamation.
No argument from me about the Douglas character in Ghost and the Darkness. My understanding is that Remington was supposed to have originally been a very small role, with the character representing one of the several hunters who drifted into Tsavo and tried their hand at the lions with no success. But after they got to Africa Douglas let his ego run away with him and expanded the part. He was exec producer and was writing the checks, so that was that. Really messed up an otherwise terrific movie. Kind of like what Jerry Jones has done with the Dallas Cowboys, for the same reasons...

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Happy Myles wrote 17 weeks 3 days ago

Is this directed at me for writing vivacious when I meaa

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Happy Myles wrote 17 weeks 3 days ago

Meant to write viscous? Have met Helen Gurley Brown and been lost at SHOT Snow

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Happy Myles wrote 17 weeks 3 days ago

I mean Show

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Harold wrote 17 weeks 3 days ago

I guess, if I read you "write", you're saying that you've forgotten more than most people know. ;)

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from RJ Arena wrote 17 weeks 3 days ago

I have worked with the public my whole life, mostly in the retail industry, and I will run into one of my customers, all most anywhere, and they will start a conversation, and I have no idea who they are. the only thing that ever saves me is to try to get them to talk about how I had assisted them in the past, then it all comes back, every detail. Funny how that works.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from tootall75 wrote 17 weeks 3 days ago

I keep all of my back issues of Field & Stream and reread all of the articles from time to time...so if I ever do meet you David (which would be awesome btw) I promise not to ambush you by quoting you and expecting you to remember (although you have had some doozies, the aformentioned rap with a club, stick or knobkerrie comes up quite often so you are apt to remember that). I would however try to convince you to maybe cross the border to New Brunswick when you visit Maine every November and check out the deer hutning we have. Much like Maine, not a ton of deer in some of the remote areas, but some beautiful big woods and big bucks.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Douglas wrote 17 weeks 3 days ago

All I can say is that my mind is like a steel trap.
One that's been left in the water too long.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from NHshtr wrote 17 weeks 3 days ago

DEP, It appears that you've reached the stage where you can discard pearls of wisdom and walk off unaware of us minions behind you scooping them up.

If I meet you at the SHOT show, I'll politely not mention anything you've written!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from davidpetzal wrote 17 weeks 3 days ago

To tootall 75. I hunted in New Brunswick for either three or four years just after the turn of the century (21st, not 20th) and enjoyed it hugely.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from tootall75 wrote 17 weeks 3 days ago

Thanks for the response DEP, I had no idea you had hunted in NB, very cool. What part of the province did you hunt and for what game animal? A lot of Americans come for moose and black bear (not sure about whitetail) although the number of people who come for black bear has been dwindling over the past few years which is too bad as the population is growing all the time. We also have some great grouse hunting, they always seems to be plentiful and some are dumb as s**t so they make for easy targets.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Bernie wrote 17 weeks 3 days ago

Mr. Petzal,

Speaking of past writings, I still remember a piece that you wrote where you mentioned that your white hunter discouraged having a sling on your rifle while hunting dangerous game. In your own inimitable style, you said that you later sat in a theater and watched a famous actor (Brad Pitt?) outrun an African lion, causing you to start snorting and braying like a jackass. Then a young person turned and said, "Like, could you hold it down, man? Like..."

The entire piece was hilarious and I wish I had saved it!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from tootall75 wrote 17 weeks 2 days ago

Hey DEP, thank you for responding once again; sounds like you were in the Southwestern part of the province in the St. John River Valley. There are lots of deer there (too many for the folks in resisdential areas, my buddy is always sending me pics of deer in his backyard, impossible to plant a garden or flowers). The Fundy coast is quite picturesque is it not? Highest tides in the world and they claim some huge whitetails in the moutains although you will have to work to get them. On a side note, I mentioned in another post that I was reading the Field & Stream Rifle Guide and I finished it, great read and full of some great info, I have recommended to many of my friends. Thanks again for responding, my son (who is 10 and a budding gun nut) marvels (and thinks it's kind of cool as do I) that you, a nationally acclaimed writer, would respond to the likes of me. In any case, I wish you and yours a Merry Christmas and Happy New Year.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Pray- hunt-work wrote 17 weeks 2 days ago

Happy- I suppose a viscous recoil is better than a viscous fart cloud. However a viscous fart is rarely a fart and often the only thing left clouded is your knickers. As for the vivacious recoil, I had too much to drink the evening I read it and I found it to be hilarious and depicting. What I'm getting at is, well, I think you were meaning to write about a VICIOUS recoil.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from tootall75 wrote 17 weeks 2 days ago

Pray-hunt-work...hahahaha...vicious fart cloud..sounds like you have been to our deer camp...not enough vicious recoil and way too many vicious fart clouds around the card table...part of camp life I suppose. Thanks for the laugh....

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from davidpetzal wrote 17 weeks 2 days ago

To O Garcia: I most certainly do remember Old Thunderdent and Mairsey Doates. I won a prize for that article, as I recall.

To Rocky Squirrel: Ed Zern taught English at a major eastern university for, I believe, one year. When I asked him why only a year, he said the students were too stupid to learn anything. Ed, by the way, had the best alibi for late copy that I ever heard. Once, when I asked him where his column was, he said: "I can't talk now. The ape bit my daughter." And it was the truth; some kind of primate that he was boarding for a friend did bite his daughter.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from wittsec wrote 17 weeks 2 days ago

The one writer that probably remembers every word that he ever wrote and is the one most in need of being able to forget is Bill Heavey. I love his writing.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from tom warner wrote 17 weeks 2 days ago

Tootall75: I will echo your enthusiasm for New Brunswick deer hunting since I hunted in your province for years back in the early 80's on and again during the 90's. I did all my hunting in the general area of Fosterville and North Lake just across the border from Orient, Maine with a man who has become a very good friend of mine, Edward Fredericks, a remarkable guy. Just spoke with him a couple of days ago. I did take one hunt near Fundy with a very well known guide and got a decent buck there, but took home some VERY big bucks from around Fosterville, one of them one inch short of "the book". I will say that it took some very serious effort however, often hunting for the entire season from dawn 'till dark. I loved hunting in your province but was saddened by the amount of logging that took place during the years I hunted there. Much of the forest that I hunted vanished over those years. I have now become an old fart and no longer go, but I enjoyed hunting in NB as much as any place that I can recall. I miss it and recommend it to any serious big buck nut willing to put in the effort.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from tootall75 wrote 17 weeks 2 days ago

Tom Warner, nice to hear someone else who has enjoyed the deer hunting here. I was born and raised (and still live) in NB and I can echo your sentiment about logging. The area I hunt in (Salmon River) still has some great hunting and vast tracts of big woods but extensive logging began in the late 80's which severely affected the deer population and ruined some great whitetail hot spots. The elder guys in our deer camp talk about the 70's and 80's before logging roads existed and the place was a whitetail nirvana. The camp log book details story of season past and the success rate was staggering..one entry list 13 guys at camp and 9...9 of then tagged a deer!!! It is slowly starting to grow up and the deer are making a comeback and we have our own stands in remote areas where you would have to actually leave the road to find (lot of Hollywood hunters). All in all I love the place and hopefully will be able to enjoy it for many years to come...Happy Holidays.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Tim Platt wrote 17 weeks 2 days ago

Happy, would vivacious or vicious more aptly describe Ms. Brown? My sister was a big Cosmo reader and I always wondered about the editor-in-chief...

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Safado wrote 17 weeks 2 days ago

Mr. Petzal,
I was fully prepared, if ever our paths crossed, to regale you on such tales as “The Wire” and the “Cowboy Way” or the blogs about how “Hard Hearts Kill” or whether we are as “Tough as our Fathers” or “Guilty of being armed while stupid”. I was a bit disappointed that someone could write such inspired tales or turn a phrase like none other yet not remember writing it. But considering that you have endured vivacious recoil, mule kicks, grizzly charges and fart clouds of epic proportions, memory loss is an acceptable side effect of a life well lived.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from MReeder wrote 17 weeks 2 days ago

Know exactly what DEP means. I can't hold a candle to his output, but over the past 30 years I've turned out enough news copy, political speeches, ad copy, personal/outdoor columns and sports copy to denude at least a small tree lot; if not a forest. Most of the news stuff was pretty mundane and forgettable by its very nature and I'm pretty sure I wrote about half of it in my sleep. There were a few times when I warmed to the subject, the sun and moon aligned and something I wrote wasn't complete gibberish; and I have a vague recollection of what I wrote. Mostly, I couldn't tell you what I put to paper three days ago. Right now it's mostly high school sports coverage and I'm faced every week with some parent quoting something back at me that might as well be in Lithuanian for all I can recall about it.
Turning to DEP's other main topic of conversation, what kind of food do they serve at that Shot Show? Fried beans on a stick? I've encountered a few noxious bursts myself at a couple of outdoor shows here in San Antonio, but nothing to match the green clouds that seem to be lurking behind every booth in Vegas. Could it have anything to do with the proximity of Area 51? Swamp gas, perhaps?

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from edalweber wrote 17 weeks 2 days ago

Before Ed Zern started writing his column, he did ads for Nash cars which appeared in Field and Stream.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Proverbs wrote 17 weeks 2 days ago

From a well-known outdoors writer's work from the early 1980s I picked up some advice that has served me well for years: In most any social situation, you can get the upper hand by smoking a pipe, and alternating between quiet chuckles and looks of bemusement. Anyone know the source?

To NHshtr: Be careful when scooping up behind someone. Are you sure those are pearls?

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from nelsol wrote 17 weeks 2 days ago

Great post DEP. I'm sure when you wrote "fart cloud" you were actually meaning "dense cloud of foul flatulence".
As we get longer in the tooth much evades us with regard to short term memory, at least that's my excuse. Oh well, "I may not be smart, but I sure am slow" (author unknown).

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from tom warner wrote 17 weeks 2 days ago

Tootall75: I just recalled the name of the man that I hunted with near your area back around 10-12 years or so: George Chase, a helluva nice guy. As I remember, George was a former champion rifle shooter for Canada or NB some years back and quite a man. He sent me a photo (last year I think) of a great buck that he had just bow-killed. I also think that George had published or edited the book "Big Bucks of New Brunswick", something that I spent significant time drooling over. George also has monkey genes I think, because he could quickly clamber up and down stratospherically high trees up to tiny little strap-on stands that gave me acrophobia just to gaze up at, never mind when I actually looked down through the clouds from. He would even hang a little hammock up there to relax in. Chicken livered coward that I am I could never bring myself to get into one of those! Anyway, I killed a nice buck with George; maybe 'cause I wanted to get it over with and avoid venturing up to those stands-in-the-sky each day. Nice country.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Doug Schwartz wrote 17 weeks 2 days ago

Like I said to my editor a couple of years ago, "Thanks for making me a more better writer". She was not amused.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from focusfront wrote 17 weeks 2 days ago

Davidpetzal;
I think I would spell it "dopeyer," although nothing seems to work. As for the movie, I gave it credit for exactly two things; showing how fantastically dangerous real, live lions are and how necessary it was to kill the Maneaters of Tsavo. I would rather be chased by a hundred zombies than one healthy, hungry adult lion. When I read Patterson's book, it was scary in a way movies can't show well; him spending the night in a tree and coming down to see lion tracks all around the trunk, etc. As a writer, you are the last (and probably the wittiest) of a group that besides the names already mentioned included Carmichael, Cooper, Keith, Brister, Skelton, Nonte, and a couple of others. My favorite line of yours is, "Here is a list of things that scare horses; everything." I got a kick out of the way you compared the .338 to Rocky Marciano's name for his knockout punch (the old Suzy-Q) and the 7mm-08 to a nondescript looking soldier who knocked out an annoying street tough with one clout from his elbow. And so on. Keep writing.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from idahoelkandflyguy wrote 17 weeks 2 days ago

And considering we lay claim to Jack O'Conner, Elmer Kieth and Ted True blood that is not faint praise.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from PanzerIV wrote 17 weeks 2 days ago

"worried that I will blunder into a fart cloud and lose my vision" -- snicker :- )

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from ejpaul1 wrote 17 weeks 1 day ago

David Petzal is in my opinion the best gun writer alive. I am 39 and have been reading a lot of Jack O connor for some time and David is reminiscent of jack a bit. Dude, keep it coming, sarcasm blended with wit is a tractor beam for me.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from O Garcia wrote 17 weeks 1 day ago

MReeder,

I like Kilmer in that movie, it's the only one I've seen where he disappears into the Patterson character and I don't think "Val Kilmer, quirky actor" while watching. The Michael Douglas character was my main beef.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from O Garcia wrote 17 weeks 1 day ago

MReeder,

now I'm the one being forgetful. Of course, Tombstone. How can I forget?

I also forget the names of old classmates and former co-workers but remember their faces. When I meet them on the street, I make a "preemptive strike" and greet them first, so I don't have to ask "who are you again?"

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from MReeder wrote 17 weeks 1 day ago

O Garcia,
You and me both on the names and faces. Can't remember names to save my life. Only face I have trouble recognizing is the one in the mirror each morning, but I usually figure it out once I iron out the sags and wrinkles with soap and water and absorb a couple of cups of coffee...

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Mark-1 wrote 17 weeks 1 day ago

GeeWhiz: Have a copy of Patterson's book on Tsavo Man-eaters and its a good read for Victorian writing. Have to admit the book creeped me out. The Ghost and The Darkness were the names for Man-eater #1 and Man-eater #2. All photos of these lions creep me out. Almost saw both lions' stuffed remains in Chicago, but the crawling cork-screw feeling made me pass. Can't explain why, but it did.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Proverbs wrote 17 weeks 1 day ago

To idahoelkandflyguy: You are right about the author. Congratulations. You've just won the first copy of "Great Blogger Names & How To Abbreviate Them." Will be sent to you upon its publishing. Which will happen when it finds a publisher.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from idahoelkandflyguy wrote 17 weeks 7 hours ago

Proverbs: LOL. :) I will look forward to it. Maybe you should try the company that published "Great moments in deficit spending and socialized medicine"

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Ontario Honker ... wrote 17 weeks 3 days ago

Haven't been to a SHOT show and doubt I ever will. I don't care for crowds. The local gun shows are about as much as I can bear. Even in the old days when it was okay for the foolishly addicted to smoke in those venues I didn't find it at all stifling. A lot of hot air moving all the time keeps things well-ventilated. :-)

-1 Good Comment? | | Report

Post a Comment

bmxbiz-fs