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New Semiautomatic Shotgun: Weatherby SA-08 28-Gauge

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January 25, 2014

New Semiautomatic Shotgun: Weatherby SA-08 28-Gauge

By The Editors

Introducing a sub-gauge shotgun seemed to be a theme among firearm makers at SHOT Show this year. And, this new Weatherby was one of our favorites. The SA-08 28-gauge Deluxe only weighs 5.5 pounds and handles beautifully. Don't think a 28-gauge has enough killing power? Let this new semiautomatic prove you wrong … it will retail for about $850.

http://ak.c.ooyala.com/U4Z3c2azrszy3SP4gRRqfUV30DMz7buS/QCdjB5HwFOTaWQ8X4xMDoxOjA4MTsiGN

Comments (26)

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from Dangle wrote 11 weeks 3 days ago

I don't really see the 28 GA. Not enough sizable shot for anything, but small birds, and planted pheasants. Shells cost considerable, and you don't have much choice of shells. The 20 ga. is now made as light as you want to go without being "flippy", and the 20 ga. block is thin to carry. And you can shoot a 12 ga comparable pheasant load in a 20 choosing the 3" shells. And the 20 GA loads are much cheaper.

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from jhjimbo wrote 11 weeks 3 days ago

I don't understand how a 28 can perform as stated, and out to 40yds?? That must be one hell of a good shot to get those results from a 28.
I like a 16 or 20 for a all day hunt.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from kudukid wrote 11 weeks 3 days ago

The 16 gets my vote for a light gun since it's usually built on the same frame as a 20. Sadly however, due to the 20 magnum being sold as a wonder to the unclean masses, it is out of favor and shells are almost as hard to find as 28s.

Nothing seems to change - the same reason we got VHS and MS DOS foisted upon us.

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from Dangle wrote 11 weeks 3 days ago

"unclean masses?" I buy 20 GA shells in the 3" shell........1 1/4 oz of #4's, #5's, or #6's, ...readily available for $12.95 a box of American made RIO's. What's not to like about that? And I've stocked up for years to come believing the price will skyrocket. Essentially shooting the standard 12 GA field load....called "SWEET"

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from kudukid wrote 11 weeks 3 days ago

Dangle:
My complaint was that the expensive 3" 20 was pushed so hard that it shoved the 16 to near obscurity. The 2-3/4" 16 could have easily been loaded to the same performance as the 3" 20.

The frames in most offerings were the same size and within an ounce or so of the same weight.

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from Mark-1 wrote 11 weeks 3 days ago

Done an incredible amount of shooting with 28-ga. I see no difference in practical effectiveness between a 20 and 28- ga on skeet and Uplands. 40-yd dove kills are common with a 28...and all this with the standard 3/4 oz load. Loading 1-oz or 7/8 oz in a 28 is nice for pheasants and huns, but the *balance* of bore and shot load is put out of whack.

Those complaining of whippy shotguns under 6-lbs tend to be those that don't follow through on their swing IMHO.

Prefect 28-ga Upland gun: Take action of your choice..28" barrels on a double, 26" barrel on auto or pump..and a tight IC or a regular mod choke. You are set!!!!

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Dangle wrote 11 weeks 3 days ago

Mark-1 Come on! Compare the loads! I ordered a video from two very recognized "experts" on shotguns, and shooting technique..Marty Fischer, and Bruce Scott. Phil would know them well, and concur as to their knowledge base. They are shooting big pigeons in South America from blinds going through lots of shells, and lots of crossing shots. They first describe the guns they are using, and the loads. They describe these pigeons as big, tough birds to bring down. Marty talks about the gauges, and the loads needed....20, 16,and 12 ga.as the bigger gauges needed. Then he says, "notice I did not mention the .410, and the 28 ga small bores. They are too small, and should be confined to planted birds on bird farm sites where you can walk up on the birds." And these guys can shoot! He said it as a measure recognizing the resource, and not wanting wounded birds running off! And the reason the industry went to expanding the 20 ga. into the 12 ga realm load was for expense, and consolidation purposes. Much more cost effective to consolidate. Scott shot an O/U Ceasar Garreni (sp?) with 32" barrels, and Marty a 12 ga I do believe.

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from Mark-1 wrote 11 weeks 3 days ago

@Dangle: 28-ga is one of those freaks that shines brightly in the field...like the 6.5 x 55 and the 338 mag..way out of proportion to the stats. It's a mystery why they do, but they do.

Ballistics can and do prove just about anything you want, but performance in the fields can't be denied.

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from kudukid wrote 11 weeks 3 days ago

Mark-1:

Having done actual ballistic testing with sophisticated (expensive) equipment, there exist no ballistic mysteries. Ask any actual ballistician and they'll tell you the same.

-1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Dangle wrote 11 weeks 3 days ago

No mysteries for me as well...all ballistics. lead load, and muzzle velocity. Makes little difference as to the ga. marked on the barrel. Determine the choke needed. BUT... No one do....... the Voodoo... like Mark-1 do.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Drew McClure wrote 11 weeks 2 days ago

If your like me and you are rediscovering small game hunting this would be a plush weapon to walk around with, for myself I rarely choose the 1148 Remmy 28 gauge over the workhorse 16 gauge 870 with lots of "character" from years of borderline abuse and neglect. If you cringe when it gets scratched up it may not be for you. Cheers to lightweight killing sticks.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Dougfir wrote 11 weeks 2 days ago

I think Dangle's right. My understanding is that the only difference between 12, 20, 28, etc. is the number of pellets. I still drag out the 12 gauge for geese and some ducks, but I do almost everything with a 20 gauge now, including turkey.

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from MReeder wrote 11 weeks 2 days ago

I've wanted a 28 gauge in a properly scaled down gun for a long time, although I've longed for one in a SXS. I'm sure the new Weatherby is a good little shotgun, because I bought one of the youth model SA-08 20s for my wife when they first came out. At the time, Academy was selling them for a little under $200, and that wasn't very long ago. It is a delight to carry -- I've found myself using her gun instead of my pump each spring once she gets her turkey -- and so far it has functioned flawlessly. My only question would be about the $850 price tag. Granted, my wife's has a synthetic stock, and the gun in the video looks like it has fairly nice figured wood; but $650 still seems like a pretty steep premium over what I paid for the youth model just a couple of years ago.

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from Tim Platt wrote 11 weeks 2 days ago

I have always wanted a 28 gauge, unfortunately I have never even shot one. I am not bad with a .410, my dad gave me one of those Savage .22/.410 over unders and I killed my fair share of quail and rabbits. I bought my youngest son an 1100 in 20 gauge and really wanted to get him a 28 but the price of shells is crazy. If they were just reasonable I think we would see a lot more in the field, but it is a catch-22. Supply and demand means they will never catch on....

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Mark-1 wrote 11 weeks 2 days ago

Re-visited this blog, see a bunch of young Jedi's.

It's OK. I uttered much the same in my foolish youth.

Back on subject: This Weatherby 28-ga should be nice price-wise. It's $400 less than an 1100, and much lower than Beretta and Benelli. Hope it cycles well and doesn't jam.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Dangle wrote 11 weeks 2 days ago

Take a 28 GA out to the trap club, and step back from the standard 16 yd line to the 20 yd line. And clay targets fly very similar to the small, covey birds....quite a handicap for a 28 GA. Those that like a 28 GA must get some easy, close in shootin, because I sure do not. Not even for doves. Forest Grouse, (Ruff Grouse), are the only closer in shots that I get. The rest? Sharptail Grouse, Sage Grouse, Pheasants, and late season huns are generally longer range shots that take a good sized 20 GA load to bring them down dead.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from sdditchpig wrote 11 weeks 2 days ago

If you own the pheasants, and can keep the masses away from them, they won't get so wild. Those birds can be killed with the 28 gauge, at least until it snows. The pheasant on public land, I'll shoot the most efficient tool in the toolbox, the 12 gauge. When the state mandates steel shot for all upland hunting, and they are starting to talk about it, what do you do with a 28 then.

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from philbourjaily wrote 11 weeks 2 days ago

I used to hunt pheasants over pointing dogs with a 28 gauge Ruger Red Label sometimes and it was surprisingly effective with 3/4 ounce Federal Premium 7 1/2s although most of my shots were within 30-35 yards.

Dangle -- On a side note, those South American pigeons you saw Marty and Bruce shoot in the video are the most bulletproof birds I have ever hunted, especially when they don't decoy well. I wouldn't shoot them with anything but a 12.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Dangle wrote 11 weeks 2 days ago

Phil...good assessment of those pigeons. Bruce was the first, I do believe, to develop the shotgun cam. As the viewer you got to see the lead, and the shot just as Bruce saw it. He'd hit some of those pigeons, and feathers would fly like a clay target turned to dust, and the pigeon would keep right on flying. And they put together an excellent video with excellent information on shotgun shooting.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from pa pheasantman wrote 11 weeks 1 day ago

I used a .28 ga. O/U the last 2 years for pheasant and my shooting actually improved. A word of caution though, I kept all of my shots to approx. 35 yds. and under. On the downside, the ammo can be hard to find at times, with not a varied selection of loads,and also pricey. I shot all of my birds over my pointing dog.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from springerman3 wrote 11 weeks 1 day ago

Mark-1: Great comment on the young Jedi :) I use a 20 gauge for almost everything I chase, switch to the 28 for a change of pace. As long as I put muzzle in proper place birds will fall. Funny how I always read or hear folks speak of wild late season ditch parrots and the need to switch to heavy loads out of a 12 gauge. I usually shoot the same load all year long ( 7/8 oz # 6 )in the 20 and rarely have trouble killing them. I hunt private land but not the only one that has access. Good strategy and a good springer will do wonders to create good shooting oportunities ! Yes I am bragging :)

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from Dangle wrote 11 weeks 7 hours ago

Spr35ingerman..If you can tell us you have a great pointing dog, and hunt in good cover for the bigger birds, and can walk up on your pointer OK, but any box of shells that you can buy for about $7 a box is basically a trap load, especially in 28 GA shells that cost so much. One of the toughest shots to kill a rooster is the straight away shot. Shot seldom hits the head, and the tough back takes the shot, and the rooster hits the ground running. A 7/8 0z load doesn't have enough # 6 shot in the pattern at 35 and up yds. But you could always say the barrel just was not quite in the right place.

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from springerman3 wrote 10 weeks 6 days ago

Dangle:
Over 40 years bird hunting experience, pretty good at it :) Most folks who think they need enough firepower to take 40 yard plus shots can't hit them. I have hunted with only two that were capable ( both dedicated trap shooters ) and one of them had springers !
Most of my shots are under 30 yards, many of those under 20 .... I have no problem passing up the long shot on a pheasant ( especially a straight away ) but will occasionally take the long crosser as I get lots of practice on those at the local sporting clays range.
Sometimes as a second shell I use a 1 oz load of #5 or copper # 6 but the majority of my kills are one shot ( lots of practice helps me do that )
The most important line in my previous post was the next to last, " Good stategy and a good springer will do wonders to create good shooting opportunites " ! Any dog that does what it is trained to do should help its owner become a better hunter. I am loyal to springers but there are plenty of breeds that can make the hunt better for us :)
Also I found a case of 1 oz # 6 in 28 gauge at Cabela's about 5 -6 years ago ( right after I got my CZ 28 )on clearance for $7 a box. Jumped on that like a fly to potatoe salad at a picnic. I have killed ditch parrots with them too !
My apology to the gang on this blog for my lengthly post :)

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Dangle wrote 10 weeks 6 days ago

I like the lengthy posts; it explains you a lot better. Most on these threads can't compose an intelligent response. I know quite well about hitting what you are shooting at. I still come from the other direction, and know for example guys with good bird dogs that hunt late season pheasants in SD. They use 12 GA 3" Mag loads, and want to hit the rooster as hard as they can. My best load in the hay day of Eastern, WA pheasant hunting were AA low brass reloads for my 12 GA. 1 3/8 loads of #2 shot at about 1,300 fps at the muzzle. And I hit them hard, and can't ever remember damaging a bird when I cleaned it. Like a heavywt fighter's punch...the shock impact killed them not the penetration. But to each his own. Most can help from taking that 40-45 yd shot after walking for sometime, and not getting a shot. My bird dog, one of them, is a female Chocolate 3 yr. old lab that quarters, and points...one heckuva bird dog, but she got to hunt 225 days in the field after just 3yrs I can understand your position a lot better now. Can't believe though that you can score better at Sporting Clays shooting that 28 GA than you can a 20, or best using a 12 GA.

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from springerman3 wrote 10 weeks 5 days ago

Dangle: Kudos to you if you are one of the few that can hit long shots with the 12 gauge ! The ones I know usually shoot copper 4's in 1 1/4 oz....
Know I am " probably " capable but understand ballistic limits of the 20 so I refrain from those shots. Plus that does not support where & how I want my springers to hunt ( close & under control )
I would say that the 28 can be a very capable gun in the right hands and I shoot alot of 3/4 oz reloads from my 20 gauge. That has helped me realize the capabilities of the 28 and respect what it has too offer !
As a hunter ed instructor I just cringe when I hear folks talk about how the 12 gauge will make them a better shot ( or their kids ) and they can't wait for them to get bigger so they can use one. I just tell them until you master the close shots with a 20 there is no sense using a 12 ....
Over 80 % of hunters that take a CONSEP class can't hit 4 of 6 on a 20 yard crossing target ( ouch )
Thanks for the reply !

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from Dangle wrote 10 weeks 4 days ago

You know what you are doing. No, that was year's ago that I shot the heavy 12 GA., a Belgium Browning O/U. Today it is the light 20 ga. that I carry. And carry is the operative word. I have Arthritis, and take pain killers to get out there. My Benelli Montefeltro weighs 5.4 lbs, and a thinner profile. And I relish the option of shooting the 3" shell with 1 1/4 Oz of lead for pheasants, and Plain grouse that get up further out than I'd like. And I shoot a Beretta Silver 686 in 20 GA That is a 6.6 lbs. But if you are/were a Sporting Clays guy, they shoot heavier guns for solid tracking purposes. Light guns can be flippy, and I had to train myself to not snap up my auto too fast..steady, and smooth, but quick. And I do like the better tracking of my O/U, but shoot both pretty good when my eyes aren't watching where my feet need to go! Good posting. Always like to read posts from guys that understand shotguns well

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from jhjimbo wrote 11 weeks 3 days ago

I don't understand how a 28 can perform as stated, and out to 40yds?? That must be one hell of a good shot to get those results from a 28.
I like a 16 or 20 for a all day hunt.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Mark-1 wrote 11 weeks 3 days ago

Done an incredible amount of shooting with 28-ga. I see no difference in practical effectiveness between a 20 and 28- ga on skeet and Uplands. 40-yd dove kills are common with a 28...and all this with the standard 3/4 oz load. Loading 1-oz or 7/8 oz in a 28 is nice for pheasants and huns, but the *balance* of bore and shot load is put out of whack.

Those complaining of whippy shotguns under 6-lbs tend to be those that don't follow through on their swing IMHO.

Prefect 28-ga Upland gun: Take action of your choice..28" barrels on a double, 26" barrel on auto or pump..and a tight IC or a regular mod choke. You are set!!!!

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Mark-1 wrote 11 weeks 2 days ago

Re-visited this blog, see a bunch of young Jedi's.

It's OK. I uttered much the same in my foolish youth.

Back on subject: This Weatherby 28-ga should be nice price-wise. It's $400 less than an 1100, and much lower than Beretta and Benelli. Hope it cycles well and doesn't jam.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from philbourjaily wrote 11 weeks 2 days ago

I used to hunt pheasants over pointing dogs with a 28 gauge Ruger Red Label sometimes and it was surprisingly effective with 3/4 ounce Federal Premium 7 1/2s although most of my shots were within 30-35 yards.

Dangle -- On a side note, those South American pigeons you saw Marty and Bruce shoot in the video are the most bulletproof birds I have ever hunted, especially when they don't decoy well. I wouldn't shoot them with anything but a 12.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from pa pheasantman wrote 11 weeks 1 day ago

I used a .28 ga. O/U the last 2 years for pheasant and my shooting actually improved. A word of caution though, I kept all of my shots to approx. 35 yds. and under. On the downside, the ammo can be hard to find at times, with not a varied selection of loads,and also pricey. I shot all of my birds over my pointing dog.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from springerman3 wrote 11 weeks 1 day ago

Mark-1: Great comment on the young Jedi :) I use a 20 gauge for almost everything I chase, switch to the 28 for a change of pace. As long as I put muzzle in proper place birds will fall. Funny how I always read or hear folks speak of wild late season ditch parrots and the need to switch to heavy loads out of a 12 gauge. I usually shoot the same load all year long ( 7/8 oz # 6 )in the 20 and rarely have trouble killing them. I hunt private land but not the only one that has access. Good strategy and a good springer will do wonders to create good shooting oportunities ! Yes I am bragging :)

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from springerman3 wrote 10 weeks 6 days ago

Dangle:
Over 40 years bird hunting experience, pretty good at it :) Most folks who think they need enough firepower to take 40 yard plus shots can't hit them. I have hunted with only two that were capable ( both dedicated trap shooters ) and one of them had springers !
Most of my shots are under 30 yards, many of those under 20 .... I have no problem passing up the long shot on a pheasant ( especially a straight away ) but will occasionally take the long crosser as I get lots of practice on those at the local sporting clays range.
Sometimes as a second shell I use a 1 oz load of #5 or copper # 6 but the majority of my kills are one shot ( lots of practice helps me do that )
The most important line in my previous post was the next to last, " Good stategy and a good springer will do wonders to create good shooting opportunites " ! Any dog that does what it is trained to do should help its owner become a better hunter. I am loyal to springers but there are plenty of breeds that can make the hunt better for us :)
Also I found a case of 1 oz # 6 in 28 gauge at Cabela's about 5 -6 years ago ( right after I got my CZ 28 )on clearance for $7 a box. Jumped on that like a fly to potatoe salad at a picnic. I have killed ditch parrots with them too !
My apology to the gang on this blog for my lengthly post :)

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Dangle wrote 11 weeks 3 days ago

I don't really see the 28 GA. Not enough sizable shot for anything, but small birds, and planted pheasants. Shells cost considerable, and you don't have much choice of shells. The 20 ga. is now made as light as you want to go without being "flippy", and the 20 ga. block is thin to carry. And you can shoot a 12 ga comparable pheasant load in a 20 choosing the 3" shells. And the 20 GA loads are much cheaper.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from kudukid wrote 11 weeks 3 days ago

The 16 gets my vote for a light gun since it's usually built on the same frame as a 20. Sadly however, due to the 20 magnum being sold as a wonder to the unclean masses, it is out of favor and shells are almost as hard to find as 28s.

Nothing seems to change - the same reason we got VHS and MS DOS foisted upon us.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Dangle wrote 11 weeks 3 days ago

"unclean masses?" I buy 20 GA shells in the 3" shell........1 1/4 oz of #4's, #5's, or #6's, ...readily available for $12.95 a box of American made RIO's. What's not to like about that? And I've stocked up for years to come believing the price will skyrocket. Essentially shooting the standard 12 GA field load....called "SWEET"

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from kudukid wrote 11 weeks 3 days ago

Dangle:
My complaint was that the expensive 3" 20 was pushed so hard that it shoved the 16 to near obscurity. The 2-3/4" 16 could have easily been loaded to the same performance as the 3" 20.

The frames in most offerings were the same size and within an ounce or so of the same weight.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Mark-1 wrote 11 weeks 3 days ago

@Dangle: 28-ga is one of those freaks that shines brightly in the field...like the 6.5 x 55 and the 338 mag..way out of proportion to the stats. It's a mystery why they do, but they do.

Ballistics can and do prove just about anything you want, but performance in the fields can't be denied.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Dangle wrote 11 weeks 3 days ago

No mysteries for me as well...all ballistics. lead load, and muzzle velocity. Makes little difference as to the ga. marked on the barrel. Determine the choke needed. BUT... No one do....... the Voodoo... like Mark-1 do.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Drew McClure wrote 11 weeks 2 days ago

If your like me and you are rediscovering small game hunting this would be a plush weapon to walk around with, for myself I rarely choose the 1148 Remmy 28 gauge over the workhorse 16 gauge 870 with lots of "character" from years of borderline abuse and neglect. If you cringe when it gets scratched up it may not be for you. Cheers to lightweight killing sticks.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Dougfir wrote 11 weeks 2 days ago

I think Dangle's right. My understanding is that the only difference between 12, 20, 28, etc. is the number of pellets. I still drag out the 12 gauge for geese and some ducks, but I do almost everything with a 20 gauge now, including turkey.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from MReeder wrote 11 weeks 2 days ago

I've wanted a 28 gauge in a properly scaled down gun for a long time, although I've longed for one in a SXS. I'm sure the new Weatherby is a good little shotgun, because I bought one of the youth model SA-08 20s for my wife when they first came out. At the time, Academy was selling them for a little under $200, and that wasn't very long ago. It is a delight to carry -- I've found myself using her gun instead of my pump each spring once she gets her turkey -- and so far it has functioned flawlessly. My only question would be about the $850 price tag. Granted, my wife's has a synthetic stock, and the gun in the video looks like it has fairly nice figured wood; but $650 still seems like a pretty steep premium over what I paid for the youth model just a couple of years ago.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Tim Platt wrote 11 weeks 2 days ago

I have always wanted a 28 gauge, unfortunately I have never even shot one. I am not bad with a .410, my dad gave me one of those Savage .22/.410 over unders and I killed my fair share of quail and rabbits. I bought my youngest son an 1100 in 20 gauge and really wanted to get him a 28 but the price of shells is crazy. If they were just reasonable I think we would see a lot more in the field, but it is a catch-22. Supply and demand means they will never catch on....

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Dangle wrote 11 weeks 2 days ago

Take a 28 GA out to the trap club, and step back from the standard 16 yd line to the 20 yd line. And clay targets fly very similar to the small, covey birds....quite a handicap for a 28 GA. Those that like a 28 GA must get some easy, close in shootin, because I sure do not. Not even for doves. Forest Grouse, (Ruff Grouse), are the only closer in shots that I get. The rest? Sharptail Grouse, Sage Grouse, Pheasants, and late season huns are generally longer range shots that take a good sized 20 GA load to bring them down dead.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from sdditchpig wrote 11 weeks 2 days ago

If you own the pheasants, and can keep the masses away from them, they won't get so wild. Those birds can be killed with the 28 gauge, at least until it snows. The pheasant on public land, I'll shoot the most efficient tool in the toolbox, the 12 gauge. When the state mandates steel shot for all upland hunting, and they are starting to talk about it, what do you do with a 28 then.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Dangle wrote 11 weeks 2 days ago

Phil...good assessment of those pigeons. Bruce was the first, I do believe, to develop the shotgun cam. As the viewer you got to see the lead, and the shot just as Bruce saw it. He'd hit some of those pigeons, and feathers would fly like a clay target turned to dust, and the pigeon would keep right on flying. And they put together an excellent video with excellent information on shotgun shooting.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Dangle wrote 11 weeks 7 hours ago

Spr35ingerman..If you can tell us you have a great pointing dog, and hunt in good cover for the bigger birds, and can walk up on your pointer OK, but any box of shells that you can buy for about $7 a box is basically a trap load, especially in 28 GA shells that cost so much. One of the toughest shots to kill a rooster is the straight away shot. Shot seldom hits the head, and the tough back takes the shot, and the rooster hits the ground running. A 7/8 0z load doesn't have enough # 6 shot in the pattern at 35 and up yds. But you could always say the barrel just was not quite in the right place.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Dangle wrote 10 weeks 6 days ago

I like the lengthy posts; it explains you a lot better. Most on these threads can't compose an intelligent response. I know quite well about hitting what you are shooting at. I still come from the other direction, and know for example guys with good bird dogs that hunt late season pheasants in SD. They use 12 GA 3" Mag loads, and want to hit the rooster as hard as they can. My best load in the hay day of Eastern, WA pheasant hunting were AA low brass reloads for my 12 GA. 1 3/8 loads of #2 shot at about 1,300 fps at the muzzle. And I hit them hard, and can't ever remember damaging a bird when I cleaned it. Like a heavywt fighter's punch...the shock impact killed them not the penetration. But to each his own. Most can help from taking that 40-45 yd shot after walking for sometime, and not getting a shot. My bird dog, one of them, is a female Chocolate 3 yr. old lab that quarters, and points...one heckuva bird dog, but she got to hunt 225 days in the field after just 3yrs I can understand your position a lot better now. Can't believe though that you can score better at Sporting Clays shooting that 28 GA than you can a 20, or best using a 12 GA.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from springerman3 wrote 10 weeks 5 days ago

Dangle: Kudos to you if you are one of the few that can hit long shots with the 12 gauge ! The ones I know usually shoot copper 4's in 1 1/4 oz....
Know I am " probably " capable but understand ballistic limits of the 20 so I refrain from those shots. Plus that does not support where & how I want my springers to hunt ( close & under control )
I would say that the 28 can be a very capable gun in the right hands and I shoot alot of 3/4 oz reloads from my 20 gauge. That has helped me realize the capabilities of the 28 and respect what it has too offer !
As a hunter ed instructor I just cringe when I hear folks talk about how the 12 gauge will make them a better shot ( or their kids ) and they can't wait for them to get bigger so they can use one. I just tell them until you master the close shots with a 20 there is no sense using a 12 ....
Over 80 % of hunters that take a CONSEP class can't hit 4 of 6 on a 20 yard crossing target ( ouch )
Thanks for the reply !

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Dangle wrote 10 weeks 4 days ago

You know what you are doing. No, that was year's ago that I shot the heavy 12 GA., a Belgium Browning O/U. Today it is the light 20 ga. that I carry. And carry is the operative word. I have Arthritis, and take pain killers to get out there. My Benelli Montefeltro weighs 5.4 lbs, and a thinner profile. And I relish the option of shooting the 3" shell with 1 1/4 Oz of lead for pheasants, and Plain grouse that get up further out than I'd like. And I shoot a Beretta Silver 686 in 20 GA That is a 6.6 lbs. But if you are/were a Sporting Clays guy, they shoot heavier guns for solid tracking purposes. Light guns can be flippy, and I had to train myself to not snap up my auto too fast..steady, and smooth, but quick. And I do like the better tracking of my O/U, but shoot both pretty good when my eyes aren't watching where my feet need to go! Good posting. Always like to read posts from guys that understand shotguns well

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from kudukid wrote 11 weeks 3 days ago

Mark-1:

Having done actual ballistic testing with sophisticated (expensive) equipment, there exist no ballistic mysteries. Ask any actual ballistician and they'll tell you the same.

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from Dangle wrote 11 weeks 3 days ago

Mark-1 Come on! Compare the loads! I ordered a video from two very recognized "experts" on shotguns, and shooting technique..Marty Fischer, and Bruce Scott. Phil would know them well, and concur as to their knowledge base. They are shooting big pigeons in South America from blinds going through lots of shells, and lots of crossing shots. They first describe the guns they are using, and the loads. They describe these pigeons as big, tough birds to bring down. Marty talks about the gauges, and the loads needed....20, 16,and 12 ga.as the bigger gauges needed. Then he says, "notice I did not mention the .410, and the 28 ga small bores. They are too small, and should be confined to planted birds on bird farm sites where you can walk up on the birds." And these guys can shoot! He said it as a measure recognizing the resource, and not wanting wounded birds running off! And the reason the industry went to expanding the 20 ga. into the 12 ga realm load was for expense, and consolidation purposes. Much more cost effective to consolidate. Scott shot an O/U Ceasar Garreni (sp?) with 32" barrels, and Marty a 12 ga I do believe.

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