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Two Small Items from SHOT: Silky Saws and QuickClot

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February 05, 2014

Two Small Items from SHOT: Silky Saws and QuickClot

By David E. Petzal

Down in the lower level of the SHOT Show where the sun never shines and fart clouds hang heavy in the gloom, lurks the really interesting stuff—the good ideas from small manufacturers whose stocks have not yet split. This year there are two products from the nether regions that I would like to bring to your attention.

First is Silky Saws. What in the name of all that is holy is a Silky Saw? Glad you asked. Silky is a Japanese saw maker that has been around for nearly a century and makes an extensive line of terrific saws with two that are of special interest to hunters. But first a note: I’m a great believer in saws because they’ll do anything an axe will do except split wood and pound stuff, except quietly, and you won’t take off your foot.

The first is the Pocketboy (pictured here), a compact folder that comes with a 6 ¾-inch blade and its own belt case. It has a good handle, very strong hinge, and is an absolutely ferocious cutter that can handle either meat or bone. The hinge, which is bright chromed, may give you pause since we are conditioned to be camo-crazed, but I don’t care a lick about that. The price is $38.

Katanaboy is something truly different. The katana is the long sword of the samurai, and Katanaboy is a folding saw with a blade that is just under 20 inches long, a 26-inch rubberized handle, and a cutting capability that will pretty much match a chainsaw but without the noise, smell, weight, gas, and the chance that you’ll lop off part of your person. Stick one in your pickup, or on your snowmobile, or on your packhorse and smile. It costs $193. Silkysaws.com.

In my time on the fens and fields, I’ve seen two really bad cuts, both caused by knives, both involving fingers, and both very difficult to stop. With this in mind, I was very interested a few years ago at SHOT when a doctor showed me a product called Quickclot, an impregnated gauze pad that stops bleeding right away, no matter how bad it is. The problem was that it was not sold to the public, but now it is.

Quickclot is sold by an outfit called Adventure Medical Kits which, as the name implies, assembles kits in every conceivable size, shape, and form, but which also sells Quickclot. The pads, which are reasonably priced, come in packages of varying sizes, and and you can look them up at adventuremedicalkits.com.

 

Comments (12)

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from ozarkghost wrote 10 weeks 2 days ago

Because of a heart attack back in 2006, I am on a daily dose of two different blood thinners. Needless to say I bleed quit freely even with small cuts. Hunting injuries could be a serious problem for me, but the wife ordered some Quick Clot and I now carry it as part of a personal first aid kit. Gives us both some peace of mind. So far I have not found the occasion to be able to give a personal testimony on its effectiveness, and hopefully never will.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from RockySquirrel wrote 10 weeks 2 days ago

OR,,,,, you can get a CASE folding hunter with a saw included. Its a folding knife, its a saw, its both. And it is made in the good old US of A.

And maybe you might have snagged (Not that I would ever do that), a battle dressing from your time in uniform. Ebay has some from the Israeli army for about 10 bucks. Probably as good or better than Uncle Sam’s. Nothing clots faster then a properly sized battle dressing. That is rumored to have the clotting agents already impregnated. I also carry an old Army wire splint (Ebay again), rolled up. As I fall hard at least 3 times a year hunting (once in a stream bed while crossing the stream, at night, in ice).

Dave; There is a column all by itself. What is in your outdoor first aid/survival kit?

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from mwallred wrote 10 weeks 2 days ago

I wouldn't mind a chrome hinge. In fact, one of the absolutely STUPIDIST things we see these days are camo knives/saws/etc. I'm talking about products that are only visible when they're out of their case or out of your pocket. Manufacturers make the case, which is the only thing visible to animals when you're trying to be invisible, and the knife/saw itself they make camo so you can't find it if you drop it or set it down. If you've got your knife or saw out using it, does it matter if it's camo?

No! The knife/saw should be done in a bright contrasting striped pattern or something else that is very very visible if you set it down. The case it goes in, the thing that sits on your belt for all the world to see, is what should be camouflaged.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Proverbs wrote 10 weeks 1 day ago

Thanks for the timely post! This past weekend my Corona Razor saw broke, after many years of service cutting bone and pruning trees as needed. A few hours ago, right after reading your blog, I looked for these online and found the Katanaboy on a popular site for $114.95. Everywhere else it was $193 and up. After confirming it was the real deal from Silky Saws, I quickly ordered it and got my confirmation e-mail. It is supposed to be delivered in the next few days, and if I get a chance to try it out over the weekend I'll post back here. I've got a couple jobs just waiting for something the size of the Katanaboy.

By the way, the site said it was the last one in stock from Japan Plus. Just before posting this entry, I went back to the online site to check the status. Right now they updated that they now have 5 models in stock, but from a different supplier and at a price much closer to the $193 mark. I kind of feel like I got a good deal, but I'll wait to say for sure until I get a chance to explore the capabilities of the saw.

Thanks again. It's always good to see these informational nuggets regarding high-quality, outdoor-related merchandise.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from haverodwilltravel wrote 10 weeks 1 day ago

I have a Trauma at the house and one in my pack. Haven't had to use them yet....but that's a good thing like insurance.
I may grab a couple of the smaller ones for my bird vest. Over the years I've had dogs nearly rip an ear off in the brush and take some pretty bad headers into barbed wire. It's a good band aid for the rush to the animal hospital.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Tom-Tom wrote 10 weeks 1 day ago

Quickclot should be in the first aide kit of every outdoorsman. I've seen it or something like it used in an emergency situation at a car wreck. It's a small price to pay for an item that could save a life. Thanks for your timely "heads-up", Dave.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from SMC1986 wrote 10 weeks 1 day ago

Quikclot is in all my cars, my hunting bags and even the boat. Never had to use it but it's something that could save a life if the time comes. The quikclot sport is a gauze impregnated with the clotting agent and they also sell the Z fold for gunshot wounds that you stuff in the wound cavity. The old stuff that was military use only was a powder, I think they use the Z fold now.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from tom warner wrote 10 weeks 23 hours ago

I have included a predecessor to quick-clot product in my back-pack, 2 remote cabins and my home medicine chest for many years now. While I have never had to use it for any serious wounds (I am happy to say), I have tested it on a couple of more minor gashes and it works extremely well. Every outdoor guy owes it to himself to keep a few of these handy - they could save a life, especially since so many of us are constantly using knives, axes and chain saws so much of the time.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from airbornedoc wrote 10 weeks 20 hours ago

Quickclot is sexy but almost not necessary. I've never seen quickclot save a life. Tourniquets stop life-threatening hemorrhage right now and many can be applied with only one hand. Apply the tourniquet-stop the bleeding. Fashion an appropriate pressure bandage and if not able to get to a medical facility within a couple hrs, slowly release the tourniquet after the pressure bandage is applied. Tourniquets save lives. If you are worried about losing a limb because of a tourniquet, you can rest assured---all bleeding eventually stops.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Marion Johnson wrote 9 weeks 6 days ago

I

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Marion Johnson wrote 9 weeks 6 days ago

Forgot I was already logged in. I carry a packet of Quick Clot powder(Cabela's) when I am in the woods, working a ways from the house or traveling. Might not save my life but sure can stop excess leakage. The advice on tourniquet is excellent. I understand all U.S. combat troops are now trained in its use. A pre-made one is available on the Student of the gun website along with tutorial on its use. If you get one, practice.

A folding saw once allowed me to drive out of the woods rather than walk several miles. I kept a four foot bow saw behind the seat of my work truck for years. Not as fast as a chainsaw but always started and didn't stink up the truck.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Proverbs wrote 8 weeks 3 days ago

The Katanboy was late (it actually shipped from Japan), but it arrived a few days ago. I tried it out on greenwood and some very old hardwood stumps. Impressive is an understatement. I'll call its performance Krazy, capital K intended.

On green limbs, it took about six strokes to cut off 3" hardwood limbs. Limbs of 1" came down in less than a full stroke. I cut down a 14" mulberry tree in just a few minutes. On the 20" hardwood stumps it performed well, but not as incredibly as on the greenwood. The instructions say the blade is taper-ground, which is meant for live wood. It's performance on dead and live wood won this huge folder a spot as my new camp/hunting saw for firewood.

By the way, the shipping paperwork that came with the Katanaboy from Japan was all completed by hand, in Japanese. It is interesting and I'm keeping it with my hunting scrapbooks.

Thanks again, Petzal. This was a winner!

I just ordered the Pocketboy, and discovered they have a 5" model, in addition to the 6.75" mentioned by Petzal. I ordered the 5". I expect it to be my new bone saw for field carry.

0 Good Comment? | | Report

Post a Comment

from ozarkghost wrote 10 weeks 2 days ago

Because of a heart attack back in 2006, I am on a daily dose of two different blood thinners. Needless to say I bleed quit freely even with small cuts. Hunting injuries could be a serious problem for me, but the wife ordered some Quick Clot and I now carry it as part of a personal first aid kit. Gives us both some peace of mind. So far I have not found the occasion to be able to give a personal testimony on its effectiveness, and hopefully never will.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from mwallred wrote 10 weeks 2 days ago

I wouldn't mind a chrome hinge. In fact, one of the absolutely STUPIDIST things we see these days are camo knives/saws/etc. I'm talking about products that are only visible when they're out of their case or out of your pocket. Manufacturers make the case, which is the only thing visible to animals when you're trying to be invisible, and the knife/saw itself they make camo so you can't find it if you drop it or set it down. If you've got your knife or saw out using it, does it matter if it's camo?

No! The knife/saw should be done in a bright contrasting striped pattern or something else that is very very visible if you set it down. The case it goes in, the thing that sits on your belt for all the world to see, is what should be camouflaged.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Proverbs wrote 10 weeks 1 day ago

Thanks for the timely post! This past weekend my Corona Razor saw broke, after many years of service cutting bone and pruning trees as needed. A few hours ago, right after reading your blog, I looked for these online and found the Katanaboy on a popular site for $114.95. Everywhere else it was $193 and up. After confirming it was the real deal from Silky Saws, I quickly ordered it and got my confirmation e-mail. It is supposed to be delivered in the next few days, and if I get a chance to try it out over the weekend I'll post back here. I've got a couple jobs just waiting for something the size of the Katanaboy.

By the way, the site said it was the last one in stock from Japan Plus. Just before posting this entry, I went back to the online site to check the status. Right now they updated that they now have 5 models in stock, but from a different supplier and at a price much closer to the $193 mark. I kind of feel like I got a good deal, but I'll wait to say for sure until I get a chance to explore the capabilities of the saw.

Thanks again. It's always good to see these informational nuggets regarding high-quality, outdoor-related merchandise.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from RockySquirrel wrote 10 weeks 2 days ago

OR,,,,, you can get a CASE folding hunter with a saw included. Its a folding knife, its a saw, its both. And it is made in the good old US of A.

And maybe you might have snagged (Not that I would ever do that), a battle dressing from your time in uniform. Ebay has some from the Israeli army for about 10 bucks. Probably as good or better than Uncle Sam’s. Nothing clots faster then a properly sized battle dressing. That is rumored to have the clotting agents already impregnated. I also carry an old Army wire splint (Ebay again), rolled up. As I fall hard at least 3 times a year hunting (once in a stream bed while crossing the stream, at night, in ice).

Dave; There is a column all by itself. What is in your outdoor first aid/survival kit?

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from haverodwilltravel wrote 10 weeks 1 day ago

I have a Trauma at the house and one in my pack. Haven't had to use them yet....but that's a good thing like insurance.
I may grab a couple of the smaller ones for my bird vest. Over the years I've had dogs nearly rip an ear off in the brush and take some pretty bad headers into barbed wire. It's a good band aid for the rush to the animal hospital.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Tom-Tom wrote 10 weeks 1 day ago

Quickclot should be in the first aide kit of every outdoorsman. I've seen it or something like it used in an emergency situation at a car wreck. It's a small price to pay for an item that could save a life. Thanks for your timely "heads-up", Dave.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from SMC1986 wrote 10 weeks 1 day ago

Quikclot is in all my cars, my hunting bags and even the boat. Never had to use it but it's something that could save a life if the time comes. The quikclot sport is a gauze impregnated with the clotting agent and they also sell the Z fold for gunshot wounds that you stuff in the wound cavity. The old stuff that was military use only was a powder, I think they use the Z fold now.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from tom warner wrote 10 weeks 23 hours ago

I have included a predecessor to quick-clot product in my back-pack, 2 remote cabins and my home medicine chest for many years now. While I have never had to use it for any serious wounds (I am happy to say), I have tested it on a couple of more minor gashes and it works extremely well. Every outdoor guy owes it to himself to keep a few of these handy - they could save a life, especially since so many of us are constantly using knives, axes and chain saws so much of the time.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from airbornedoc wrote 10 weeks 20 hours ago

Quickclot is sexy but almost not necessary. I've never seen quickclot save a life. Tourniquets stop life-threatening hemorrhage right now and many can be applied with only one hand. Apply the tourniquet-stop the bleeding. Fashion an appropriate pressure bandage and if not able to get to a medical facility within a couple hrs, slowly release the tourniquet after the pressure bandage is applied. Tourniquets save lives. If you are worried about losing a limb because of a tourniquet, you can rest assured---all bleeding eventually stops.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Marion Johnson wrote 9 weeks 6 days ago

I

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Marion Johnson wrote 9 weeks 6 days ago

Forgot I was already logged in. I carry a packet of Quick Clot powder(Cabela's) when I am in the woods, working a ways from the house or traveling. Might not save my life but sure can stop excess leakage. The advice on tourniquet is excellent. I understand all U.S. combat troops are now trained in its use. A pre-made one is available on the Student of the gun website along with tutorial on its use. If you get one, practice.

A folding saw once allowed me to drive out of the woods rather than walk several miles. I kept a four foot bow saw behind the seat of my work truck for years. Not as fast as a chainsaw but always started and didn't stink up the truck.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Proverbs wrote 8 weeks 3 days ago

The Katanboy was late (it actually shipped from Japan), but it arrived a few days ago. I tried it out on greenwood and some very old hardwood stumps. Impressive is an understatement. I'll call its performance Krazy, capital K intended.

On green limbs, it took about six strokes to cut off 3" hardwood limbs. Limbs of 1" came down in less than a full stroke. I cut down a 14" mulberry tree in just a few minutes. On the 20" hardwood stumps it performed well, but not as incredibly as on the greenwood. The instructions say the blade is taper-ground, which is meant for live wood. It's performance on dead and live wood won this huge folder a spot as my new camp/hunting saw for firewood.

By the way, the shipping paperwork that came with the Katanaboy from Japan was all completed by hand, in Japanese. It is interesting and I'm keeping it with my hunting scrapbooks.

Thanks again, Petzal. This was a winner!

I just ordered the Pocketboy, and discovered they have a 5" model, in addition to the 6.75" mentioned by Petzal. I ordered the 5". I expect it to be my new bone saw for field carry.

0 Good Comment? | | Report

Post a Comment

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