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Do You Need a Cormorant Hunt in Your Area?

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February 07, 2012

Do You Need a Cormorant Hunt in Your Area?

By Joe Cermele

An article recently popped up on the website of CBC News about the ever-growing cormorant problem in Canada. While this birds are technically shore dwellers, over the last ten years they've made a noticeable migration inland, taking up residence on rivers, lakes, and ponds. So rampant and ravenous are these birds, a group called the P.E.I. Baitfishers is petitioning to the local Department of Fish and Wildlife to set up a cormorant cull, allowing hunters to thin out the herd in selected sites where trout and salmon spawn. It's not the first time of heard the idea, and the problem is certainly not restricted to Canada. There have actually been criminal cases brought against U.S. residents that took culling matters into their own hands. In some states, sharpshooters are also hired to reduce bird populations.

These birds, which can swim great distances underwater and dive deep too boot, will chase fish down and just keep eating until they simply can't fit any more in their stomachs. The cormorant in the photo has a trout, but if you Google images, you'll find the same shot with everything from crappies, to bluegills, to catfish, to bass. I've heard anglers gripe about the birds cross-country, and have personally witnessed them chasing down fish as far inland as Lake Barkley in Kentucky. Back in the late summer, I watched a cormorant on one of my favorite local carp ponds scare fish in the shallow water for hours. Eventually the bird managed to subdue a carp that weighed about four pounds.

So I'm curious...are you seeing more cormorants in your area? And if given the chance, would you take part in a legal hunt? I would.

Comments (27)

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from rdorman wrote 2 years 10 weeks ago

i've seen a few but not too many...i would however take part in a legal hunt if it was based upon research

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from Huron wrote 2 years 10 weeks ago

I'm with ya Joe, I've got a strong desire to take out as many cormorants as I've got shotgun shells.

They've been decimating our waters for too long and are due for a population correction. I've heard rumors that the Feds have been putting oil on their eggs at the nesting grounds to keep their numbers in check.

That's a good start, but the mature birds need to be taken out as well.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from SD_Whitetail_Hntr wrote 2 years 10 weeks ago

I can't even begin to explain how on board I would be with this hunt. It is completely scary how quickly they have infested areas of the Glacial Lakes region in South Dakota and North Dakota. I've heard research on the volume of fish these birds consume on a daily basis, and we have small lakes (less than a couple square miles) that have been GREAT perch fishing lakes in years before the Cormorant populations started booming.. and many of those lakes seem to have lost all signs of perch. I've seen some of those same small lakes, with dead timber where they seem to like to nest, with Cormorants numbering near 1000 no problem. Game-Fish mentioned they'll eat 2 lbs of fish a day each.. you do the math. I think it's a lot worse problem than it has gotten credit for in our area thus far. We simply don't have wildlife officials trying to put together any connections between their numbers and what I believe is an apparent decline in quality fishing in smaller lake fisheries.

I'm also pretty confused why they seem to be very regionalized even within a "portion" of SD. Like I live about 3 hours southeast of where I grew up and where I do most of my hunting. Where I currently live, I don't see a ton of Cormorants. Where I grew up, they seem to be everywhere. Both locations are 100% in the heart of Glacial Lakes country with similar food sources, water types, etc.. It doesn't seem to make much sense.

Anywho, I'll stop rambling.. Basically I'd love to kill off those things because I'm convinced they devistate fisheries like the ones I enjoy.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from dleurquin wrote 2 years 10 weeks ago

Their large numbers, exceptional fishing skills, and voracious appetites make them a big problem in my area. I'm all for declaring open season on cormorants.

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from Koldkut wrote 2 years 10 weeks ago

Just a thought, but we are going to punish a species for being successful? I mean, we've done it in the past, Coyotes get killed for the same reason. The state of Colorado loves you for killing pike to save their cash cow, the MRT(Magnificent Rainbow Trout). Lake trout have become another target of the Colorado DOW recently for eating too many trout and kokanee. Man, I tell ya, we humans don't like any competition.

Cormorants were protected when I was growing up in Texas, they would swing over the duck decoys un-harassed. And I bet they taste worse than a merganser.

So what if they were coastal...Look at the mighty elk, once a grassland animal, kicked into the mountainous terrain, never to return to its grassland roots, unless they want to be hunted. Colorado DOW will hand out an unlimited number(you pay for it of course, but there is no lottery on them) of plains elk tags for anyone who wants to hunt them in their traditional setting.

But I sure would like it if there were less of them eating my crappie....

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from dleurquin wrote 2 years 10 weeks ago

What used to be a rare cormorant sighting as a kid in Wisconsin, is now a setting where there are huge flocks of them inhabiting lakes during most of the open water season. They've altered the Aquatic eco system by eating-up all of the forage to medium sized fish. Of course, that takes away a lot of my pan fishing opportunities, but it also takes away a substantial amount of food from predator fish like bass, northern and muskies. Cormorants changed how they live in the upper midwest. I wouldn't lose sleep over "correcting" their populations based on what I think are more appropriate numbers from 30 to 40 years ago.

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from Blackdog1100 wrote 2 years 10 weeks ago

Its easy to say shoot them all, and I have often found myself cursing them as they devour fish while my line lays limp, but I couldn't support open season on cormorants before understanding why there has been a sudden population explosion, and seeing numbers that validate the claim of a sharp rise in the population. I'm all for keeping populations in check, but we've seen it before where we do more harm than good by interfering with nature without fully comprehending the consequences of our actions. Is there some shortage of their natural coastal prey that has been decimated causing them to move inland? Has one of their natural predators disappeared? If they truly don't belong on inland lakes and rivers I'm all for open season, but if we just don't like them being there because they decrease our odds of success I say let them live.

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from rob wrote 2 years 10 weeks ago

I'm all about it. At 3 to 4 pounds of fish per day per bird, they are hard on a resource. They remain localized in MT, but where they are found they have really put a hurt on the fisheries.
As for the fella that says that elk no longer live in the plains, that's where elk numbers in MT. are booming, from Big Timber to Baker. A number of factors, wolves being a big one, funny how elk have gotten tired of them and moved out of the Yellowstone ecosystem. Also less hunting pressure than in National forest, large ranches, good forage. The elk in the eastern half have moved in from the Teddy Roosevelt in ND. Same thoughts apply to the elk populations around Fort Peck.
A cormorant season would rock.

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from weedless97 wrote 2 years 10 weeks ago

Cormorant Hunt, 2012.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from dleurquin wrote 2 years 10 weeks ago

Blackdog, your right that we should try to understand why cormorants are running rampant in areas not previously inhabited by them. But while cormorants are populating like rabbits, the health of a lot of aquatic life is crashing, possibly with permanent consequences. I think part of the problem is cormorants have no predators in these population-explosion areas.

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from JB101 wrote 2 years 10 weeks ago

We're in a full blown pandemic here on certain lakes in Northern Ontario. They're destroying fish populations. The first time I saw one in the duck blind I thought "man that's a funny looking duck!" It ate a load of black cloud. They are invasive, and as others have said, where these birds are present, fisheries are in big trouble. I would fully support a cormorant hunt, but until then, i'll continue to mistake them for funny looking ducks.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from dcrocks6 wrote 2 years 10 weeks ago

there are cormorants at a small lake where i fish for trout and those birds have become so used to people that they will steal fish off of your line. there was one time where i went to net a friends fish when a cormorant came shooting up from underneath and i had to fight it off with the net to keep the fish. when the birds are this used to people and are putting a huge dent in the fish population there needs to be something done about it

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Dances with Deer wrote 2 years 10 weeks ago

These days, you may need studies to prove to the feds that they're potentially damaging fisheries. Michigan did just that and got permission to knock back the numbers with lethal control and egg oiling (they continue to sit, but eggs don't hatch). Wisconsin did the same. Though less aggressive on the lethal control than Michigan, they have shot birds there too, but are mainly relying on egg oiling to slow the growth. The birds are long-lived, and need to be culled/managed like anything else that is overabundant (Canada geese, deer, etc.). Yet there remains some within USFWS that prefer the "hands off" approach. They obviously aren't anglers. They're likely the same types who love the PBS wolf stories (such beautiful family animals!) because they don't live with wolves in their backyard — eating the deer they hunt, the livestock they grow and the pets they love. I'm all for some cormorants and some wolves. Again, though, they need to be managed so as not to harm the resource to the point of a big economic loss to fisheries or wildlife resources. It took nearly a decade of public hearings and studies to get the feds to give in. They still are calling some islands off limits in Wisconsin as refuges. That's a problem. These nurseries mean continued need to egg-oil other areas as the population grows and birds shift to other islands.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from ingebrigtsen wrote 2 years 10 weeks ago

take it from a norskie that has hunted and eaten cormorant since early childhood. cormorant is absolutely exclusively delishious.. if u make sure to remove ALL the fat and sinews.. then sear in a hot pan on both sides, make a big pot of brown sauce based on wheat flour, fine cut onions and butter, dump in the seared meat and let it slow simmer as long as possible, hours, till the meat literally falls off the bone, serve with boiled potatoes, green pea stew and what ever coutrements one percieves fits..
but i cannot stress this enough, the meat must be completely fat free or it will taste fishy.. i learned to clean it while i was 5 i think and we used to have hunting days for cormorant, not as a culling device exactly since our populations where vast, but to get the meat.. if theire populations have grown so vast as to make people percieve them as pests, then legislate a hunting season for them.. theire a boon, not a pest, and as i said absolutely mouthwatering delishious.
id pay alot of money for the meat if it was legal to trade it. belive me in this ;)
-droling like homer and going "cormorant, mmmmm"-

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from sgriffflyguy wrote 2 years 10 weeks ago

In the U.K. we have been suffering the same heist.
People have to have a proper license to shoot these and keep their numbers down but they are definitely a hindrance to our trout populations.
The main reason they have come inland here is that overfishing in the seas around the U.K. have led to the migration inland and their stocks of whatever they used to feed on at sea are diminishing.
Just go and shoot a few that are causing all the havoc.

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from David Fehlinger wrote 2 years 10 weeks ago

I've spotted some in Brookville Reservoir, 35 miles northwest of Cincinnati.

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from Jerry Allen wrote 2 years 10 weeks ago

when I was a kid they were so rare that when one appeared we all stopped to look at what appeared to be submarine's periscope. Now the damn things are everywhere. They sit on boats and leave behind volumes of poop that you can't imagine. Where we live I swear they spot the hatchery trucks in the spring and follow them around. It makes you want to cry when you watch them popping up repeatedly with trout in their mouths.

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from Chinook627 wrote 2 years 10 weeks ago

Where I live in New York these birds are terrible. Not only have they been introduced here years ago, they eat everything and anything that swims. I have actually watched on opening day trout season just one of these birds dive down and come up with at least 4 or 5 trout in the span of about 5 minutes. When these things travel in flocks like they usually do, you can say goodbye to any trout living in a pond. I've even watched them chase trout in streams to the point where I was almost snagging the damn birds that were getting in the way of me casting. I'm strictly a fisherman, but I tell every one of my buddies who hunt to petition to the state to be able to kill a few of these things. I hear they taste horrible as table fare (go figure), but something needs to be done about them. I'd even be willing to start hunting if I'd be able to help contain these birds a little.

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from billerooo wrote 2 years 10 weeks ago

In Oklahoma I have watched them in shallow slough and small waters by the hundreds. It looked as if they were working a picket line down through the water herding the fish. The crappie fishing in this particular slough has gotten down right poor. And the farm ponds that these birds get into can be wiped out in a afternoon. I know of fish farmers getting into trouble for shooting them to protect the harvest.

Lets open season on em.

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from crowman wrote 2 years 10 weeks ago

Up in Northern California on the impounds on the Klamath River system these birds are breeding like rats and are causing all sorts of problems. Not only there eating everything that swims their roost areas in 60 to 70 foot evergreen tree's are dying from all the bird crap they deposit. When you go by the roost in summer it looks like a heavy snow storm just blew in and the smell would choke a maggot. Would I support a culling? I would finance it and lead the charge.

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from joejv4 wrote 2 years 10 weeks ago

Chinook627 shares my views living in NY and watching these things take over various bodies of water. Fortunately for me, they stay off my favorite fishing hole because there's a pair of bald eagles nesting there.

Other places I fish, where I rarely got skunked - now are infested with these nasty birds and catching fish is becoming more rare.

Like all wildlife that we have, management needs to happen. There really should be a season on them - strictly for management purposes. Much like snow geese (aka light geese) the population is getting to the point where they are hurting the habitat and decimating the aquatic ecosystems they have adopted. In Upstate NY, they are no less an invasive species than zebra muscles or round gobys. We need the FWS to issue a conservation order on cormorants, just like they did on snow geese. Cull, cull, cull until their population is less damaging to the habitat.

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from ingebrigtsen wrote 2 years 10 weeks ago

cormorants should be hunted for food cos theire delishious you uncooth burgerfed plebians!!!

http://www.nettavisen.no/innenriks/article771937.ece

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from billerooo wrote 2 years 10 weeks ago

comorant jerky/water turkey jerky - hmmm that doesn't sound so bad. Then again after it is turned into jerky just about anything is good.

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from ingebrigtsen wrote 2 years 10 weeks ago
from Trapper Vic wrote 2 years 9 weeks ago

Dept. of natural resourses in Ohio are poisonimg them on the Islands in Lake Erie. Their defication is killing the Island habitat and running off all the other shore birds ect. I've hunted Sandusky bay during their migration and they are so thick they can blockout the sun. Best time to eradicate them is during spring nesting!

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from uglymike wrote 2 years 8 weeks ago

Lots of them here in Nebraska. If our ultra-conservative Game and Parks commission were to make it legal to cull them, I'd volunteer and supply my own shells.

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from David Lester wrote 2 years 7 weeks ago

Ask any salt water fisherman from Maine to CT about the cormorant and what it did to the flounder populations during spawning season. These predators have been reaking havoc for decades and now since there is no prey in the brackish and shallow waters off the new england coast, they have no where else to go but inland. Everyone should be screaming for some kind of control/hunt/poison to your representatives and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

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Post a Comment

from JB101 wrote 2 years 10 weeks ago

We're in a full blown pandemic here on certain lakes in Northern Ontario. They're destroying fish populations. The first time I saw one in the duck blind I thought "man that's a funny looking duck!" It ate a load of black cloud. They are invasive, and as others have said, where these birds are present, fisheries are in big trouble. I would fully support a cormorant hunt, but until then, i'll continue to mistake them for funny looking ducks.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from ingebrigtsen wrote 2 years 10 weeks ago

cormorants should be hunted for food cos theire delishious you uncooth burgerfed plebians!!!

http://www.nettavisen.no/innenriks/article771937.ece

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Huron wrote 2 years 10 weeks ago

I'm with ya Joe, I've got a strong desire to take out as many cormorants as I've got shotgun shells.

They've been decimating our waters for too long and are due for a population correction. I've heard rumors that the Feds have been putting oil on their eggs at the nesting grounds to keep their numbers in check.

That's a good start, but the mature birds need to be taken out as well.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from SD_Whitetail_Hntr wrote 2 years 10 weeks ago

I can't even begin to explain how on board I would be with this hunt. It is completely scary how quickly they have infested areas of the Glacial Lakes region in South Dakota and North Dakota. I've heard research on the volume of fish these birds consume on a daily basis, and we have small lakes (less than a couple square miles) that have been GREAT perch fishing lakes in years before the Cormorant populations started booming.. and many of those lakes seem to have lost all signs of perch. I've seen some of those same small lakes, with dead timber where they seem to like to nest, with Cormorants numbering near 1000 no problem. Game-Fish mentioned they'll eat 2 lbs of fish a day each.. you do the math. I think it's a lot worse problem than it has gotten credit for in our area thus far. We simply don't have wildlife officials trying to put together any connections between their numbers and what I believe is an apparent decline in quality fishing in smaller lake fisheries.

I'm also pretty confused why they seem to be very regionalized even within a "portion" of SD. Like I live about 3 hours southeast of where I grew up and where I do most of my hunting. Where I currently live, I don't see a ton of Cormorants. Where I grew up, they seem to be everywhere. Both locations are 100% in the heart of Glacial Lakes country with similar food sources, water types, etc.. It doesn't seem to make much sense.

Anywho, I'll stop rambling.. Basically I'd love to kill off those things because I'm convinced they devistate fisheries like the ones I enjoy.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from dleurquin wrote 2 years 10 weeks ago

Their large numbers, exceptional fishing skills, and voracious appetites make them a big problem in my area. I'm all for declaring open season on cormorants.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from rob wrote 2 years 10 weeks ago

I'm all about it. At 3 to 4 pounds of fish per day per bird, they are hard on a resource. They remain localized in MT, but where they are found they have really put a hurt on the fisheries.
As for the fella that says that elk no longer live in the plains, that's where elk numbers in MT. are booming, from Big Timber to Baker. A number of factors, wolves being a big one, funny how elk have gotten tired of them and moved out of the Yellowstone ecosystem. Also less hunting pressure than in National forest, large ranches, good forage. The elk in the eastern half have moved in from the Teddy Roosevelt in ND. Same thoughts apply to the elk populations around Fort Peck.
A cormorant season would rock.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from weedless97 wrote 2 years 10 weeks ago

Cormorant Hunt, 2012.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from dcrocks6 wrote 2 years 10 weeks ago

there are cormorants at a small lake where i fish for trout and those birds have become so used to people that they will steal fish off of your line. there was one time where i went to net a friends fish when a cormorant came shooting up from underneath and i had to fight it off with the net to keep the fish. when the birds are this used to people and are putting a huge dent in the fish population there needs to be something done about it

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Dances with Deer wrote 2 years 10 weeks ago

These days, you may need studies to prove to the feds that they're potentially damaging fisheries. Michigan did just that and got permission to knock back the numbers with lethal control and egg oiling (they continue to sit, but eggs don't hatch). Wisconsin did the same. Though less aggressive on the lethal control than Michigan, they have shot birds there too, but are mainly relying on egg oiling to slow the growth. The birds are long-lived, and need to be culled/managed like anything else that is overabundant (Canada geese, deer, etc.). Yet there remains some within USFWS that prefer the "hands off" approach. They obviously aren't anglers. They're likely the same types who love the PBS wolf stories (such beautiful family animals!) because they don't live with wolves in their backyard — eating the deer they hunt, the livestock they grow and the pets they love. I'm all for some cormorants and some wolves. Again, though, they need to be managed so as not to harm the resource to the point of a big economic loss to fisheries or wildlife resources. It took nearly a decade of public hearings and studies to get the feds to give in. They still are calling some islands off limits in Wisconsin as refuges. That's a problem. These nurseries mean continued need to egg-oil other areas as the population grows and birds shift to other islands.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from ingebrigtsen wrote 2 years 10 weeks ago

take it from a norskie that has hunted and eaten cormorant since early childhood. cormorant is absolutely exclusively delishious.. if u make sure to remove ALL the fat and sinews.. then sear in a hot pan on both sides, make a big pot of brown sauce based on wheat flour, fine cut onions and butter, dump in the seared meat and let it slow simmer as long as possible, hours, till the meat literally falls off the bone, serve with boiled potatoes, green pea stew and what ever coutrements one percieves fits..
but i cannot stress this enough, the meat must be completely fat free or it will taste fishy.. i learned to clean it while i was 5 i think and we used to have hunting days for cormorant, not as a culling device exactly since our populations where vast, but to get the meat.. if theire populations have grown so vast as to make people percieve them as pests, then legislate a hunting season for them.. theire a boon, not a pest, and as i said absolutely mouthwatering delishious.
id pay alot of money for the meat if it was legal to trade it. belive me in this ;)
-droling like homer and going "cormorant, mmmmm"-

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from ingebrigtsen wrote 2 years 10 weeks ago
from rdorman wrote 2 years 10 weeks ago

i've seen a few but not too many...i would however take part in a legal hunt if it was based upon research

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Koldkut wrote 2 years 10 weeks ago

Just a thought, but we are going to punish a species for being successful? I mean, we've done it in the past, Coyotes get killed for the same reason. The state of Colorado loves you for killing pike to save their cash cow, the MRT(Magnificent Rainbow Trout). Lake trout have become another target of the Colorado DOW recently for eating too many trout and kokanee. Man, I tell ya, we humans don't like any competition.

Cormorants were protected when I was growing up in Texas, they would swing over the duck decoys un-harassed. And I bet they taste worse than a merganser.

So what if they were coastal...Look at the mighty elk, once a grassland animal, kicked into the mountainous terrain, never to return to its grassland roots, unless they want to be hunted. Colorado DOW will hand out an unlimited number(you pay for it of course, but there is no lottery on them) of plains elk tags for anyone who wants to hunt them in their traditional setting.

But I sure would like it if there were less of them eating my crappie....

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from dleurquin wrote 2 years 10 weeks ago

What used to be a rare cormorant sighting as a kid in Wisconsin, is now a setting where there are huge flocks of them inhabiting lakes during most of the open water season. They've altered the Aquatic eco system by eating-up all of the forage to medium sized fish. Of course, that takes away a lot of my pan fishing opportunities, but it also takes away a substantial amount of food from predator fish like bass, northern and muskies. Cormorants changed how they live in the upper midwest. I wouldn't lose sleep over "correcting" their populations based on what I think are more appropriate numbers from 30 to 40 years ago.

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from Blackdog1100 wrote 2 years 10 weeks ago

Its easy to say shoot them all, and I have often found myself cursing them as they devour fish while my line lays limp, but I couldn't support open season on cormorants before understanding why there has been a sudden population explosion, and seeing numbers that validate the claim of a sharp rise in the population. I'm all for keeping populations in check, but we've seen it before where we do more harm than good by interfering with nature without fully comprehending the consequences of our actions. Is there some shortage of their natural coastal prey that has been decimated causing them to move inland? Has one of their natural predators disappeared? If they truly don't belong on inland lakes and rivers I'm all for open season, but if we just don't like them being there because they decrease our odds of success I say let them live.

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from dleurquin wrote 2 years 10 weeks ago

Blackdog, your right that we should try to understand why cormorants are running rampant in areas not previously inhabited by them. But while cormorants are populating like rabbits, the health of a lot of aquatic life is crashing, possibly with permanent consequences. I think part of the problem is cormorants have no predators in these population-explosion areas.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from sgriffflyguy wrote 2 years 10 weeks ago

In the U.K. we have been suffering the same heist.
People have to have a proper license to shoot these and keep their numbers down but they are definitely a hindrance to our trout populations.
The main reason they have come inland here is that overfishing in the seas around the U.K. have led to the migration inland and their stocks of whatever they used to feed on at sea are diminishing.
Just go and shoot a few that are causing all the havoc.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from David Fehlinger wrote 2 years 10 weeks ago

I've spotted some in Brookville Reservoir, 35 miles northwest of Cincinnati.

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from Jerry Allen wrote 2 years 10 weeks ago

when I was a kid they were so rare that when one appeared we all stopped to look at what appeared to be submarine's periscope. Now the damn things are everywhere. They sit on boats and leave behind volumes of poop that you can't imagine. Where we live I swear they spot the hatchery trucks in the spring and follow them around. It makes you want to cry when you watch them popping up repeatedly with trout in their mouths.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Chinook627 wrote 2 years 10 weeks ago

Where I live in New York these birds are terrible. Not only have they been introduced here years ago, they eat everything and anything that swims. I have actually watched on opening day trout season just one of these birds dive down and come up with at least 4 or 5 trout in the span of about 5 minutes. When these things travel in flocks like they usually do, you can say goodbye to any trout living in a pond. I've even watched them chase trout in streams to the point where I was almost snagging the damn birds that were getting in the way of me casting. I'm strictly a fisherman, but I tell every one of my buddies who hunt to petition to the state to be able to kill a few of these things. I hear they taste horrible as table fare (go figure), but something needs to be done about them. I'd even be willing to start hunting if I'd be able to help contain these birds a little.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from billerooo wrote 2 years 10 weeks ago

In Oklahoma I have watched them in shallow slough and small waters by the hundreds. It looked as if they were working a picket line down through the water herding the fish. The crappie fishing in this particular slough has gotten down right poor. And the farm ponds that these birds get into can be wiped out in a afternoon. I know of fish farmers getting into trouble for shooting them to protect the harvest.

Lets open season on em.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from crowman wrote 2 years 10 weeks ago

Up in Northern California on the impounds on the Klamath River system these birds are breeding like rats and are causing all sorts of problems. Not only there eating everything that swims their roost areas in 60 to 70 foot evergreen tree's are dying from all the bird crap they deposit. When you go by the roost in summer it looks like a heavy snow storm just blew in and the smell would choke a maggot. Would I support a culling? I would finance it and lead the charge.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from joejv4 wrote 2 years 10 weeks ago

Chinook627 shares my views living in NY and watching these things take over various bodies of water. Fortunately for me, they stay off my favorite fishing hole because there's a pair of bald eagles nesting there.

Other places I fish, where I rarely got skunked - now are infested with these nasty birds and catching fish is becoming more rare.

Like all wildlife that we have, management needs to happen. There really should be a season on them - strictly for management purposes. Much like snow geese (aka light geese) the population is getting to the point where they are hurting the habitat and decimating the aquatic ecosystems they have adopted. In Upstate NY, they are no less an invasive species than zebra muscles or round gobys. We need the FWS to issue a conservation order on cormorants, just like they did on snow geese. Cull, cull, cull until their population is less damaging to the habitat.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from billerooo wrote 2 years 10 weeks ago

comorant jerky/water turkey jerky - hmmm that doesn't sound so bad. Then again after it is turned into jerky just about anything is good.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Trapper Vic wrote 2 years 9 weeks ago

Dept. of natural resourses in Ohio are poisonimg them on the Islands in Lake Erie. Their defication is killing the Island habitat and running off all the other shore birds ect. I've hunted Sandusky bay during their migration and they are so thick they can blockout the sun. Best time to eradicate them is during spring nesting!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from uglymike wrote 2 years 8 weeks ago

Lots of them here in Nebraska. If our ultra-conservative Game and Parks commission were to make it legal to cull them, I'd volunteer and supply my own shells.

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from David Lester wrote 2 years 7 weeks ago

Ask any salt water fisherman from Maine to CT about the cormorant and what it did to the flounder populations during spawning season. These predators have been reaking havoc for decades and now since there is no prey in the brackish and shallow waters off the new england coast, they have no where else to go but inland. Everyone should be screaming for some kind of control/hunt/poison to your representatives and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

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