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Vintage Tackle Contest: Castglo King Automatic Float

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October 18, 2012

Vintage Tackle Contest: Castglo King Automatic Float

By Joe Cermele

We've been seeing a lot of lures lately in the vintage tackle contest, so here's a nice little change-up. This Castglo King Automatic Float was submitted by Harvey Velix, who picked up the odd-ball item at a flea market for one dollar. To get the back story on this piece, Dr. Todd Larson of the The Whitefish Press and "Fishing For History" blog called in some big guns. Dr. Todd wrote: This neat bobber came in the very week I was reviewing a pre-press copy of the definitive history of angling floats, written by British collector Jeff Della Mura. I contacted Jeff so he could give you the "royal treatment," so to speak

So here's what expert Della Mura had to say:

"The Castglo King is a 1950s gem! Patented by John H. Dean of Rochester, NY, in April 1951, the paperwork promises “Many hours of enjoyable fishing.” Dean’s true objective was to enable the angler to fish in water deeper than the length of the pole – beyond which casting becomes difficult. Because the Castglo worked primarily as a slip bobber it would sit almost on the sinker when cast. On hitting the water, the sinker would pull the line thru the bobber until striking bottom, causing the line to slacken and the bobber to fall flat. When a fish tugged at the baited hook the Castglo would swing upright, alerting the angler to strike. Once the hook was set and the line tightened, the bobber would again slip down the line making retrieval easy. You could see a Castglo coming - it was luminous white one side and colored red on the other. They are worth around $15 but with the packaging intact that could easily double. I’ve seen different paperwork which suggests the Castglo was made in Toronto – where it was referred to as the Castglo King – and in Rochester, NY where makers Big Eight Enterprises Inc. simply called it the Castglo Bobber. A great find!

To be honest, it actually sounds like it might be useful. Maybe you should try it, Harvey. Thanks for sending and enjoy the Berkley Digital Tournament Scale that's headed your way. And special thanks to Jeff Della Mura for the guest appraisal!

If you've already sent me photos of your vintage tackle, keep checking every Thursday to see if I chose it for an appraisal by Dr. Todd. If you haven't and want to enter the contest, email photos of your old tackle to fstackle@gmail.com, along with your name, mailing address, and story of how you acquired the gear. If I use it in a Thursday post, you get a Berkley Digital Tournament Scale (left, $40).

Comments (6)

Top Rated
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from Alex Grimaudo wrote 1 year 26 weeks ago

What an ingenious invention...too bad they don't make them anymore. And the fact that it is wood adds a ton of aesthetic value.

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from buckhunter wrote 1 year 26 weeks ago

Have never seen a slip bobber designed to fish the bottom. Interesting concept. I do not believe there is anything on the market now that does the same thing. Probably too difficult to see at night and in choppy waves.

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from whitefishpress wrote 1 year 26 weeks ago

The bobber was plastic not wood. I believe it was used back in the time when anglers would carry hypodermic needles and shoot air into earth worms so they'd float off the bottom. This way, the sinker took it to the bobber, the worm floated up, and the bobber warned when a fish was on.

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from Charlie Woodman wrote 1 year 26 weeks ago

I have been thinking about just such a bobber for spin casting a fly . The thought is sometimes you just can't get a fly where you want it. I like to fish in deep pools so I tie on an emerger fly with 6-8 feet of line between the fly and bobber. I add a split shot.I then cast the rig above the pool so it floats into the pool. I let it come to rest somewhere in the pool and the fly sinks. After a short count i retrieve the rig for a few turns of the bale and the fly rises up like an emerger coming from the bottom.Then I let it sink again and repeat. It is very effective. This kind of bobber whould let the fly go to bottom getting it down where the biggies are.Hmmm , guess i'll work on it over the winter.

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from buckhunter wrote 1 year 26 weeks ago

Charlie,

I like the way you think.

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from Tc505 wrote 1 year 26 weeks ago

charlie Woodman
the best thing I have found for this action you are wanting is a small stick float. have seen anglers using them with tube jigs as well. once cast they would twitch it making the jig dance. some of those will also slide up and act like the castglo. most will use a bobber stop bead but if wanting to fish deep bottom just let it slide down thru it. old time anglers weren't stupid, they came up with stuff that worked in their time like the torpedo, lucky 13 etc. and the stuff worked!!

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from whitefishpress wrote 1 year 26 weeks ago

The bobber was plastic not wood. I believe it was used back in the time when anglers would carry hypodermic needles and shoot air into earth worms so they'd float off the bottom. This way, the sinker took it to the bobber, the worm floated up, and the bobber warned when a fish was on.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Alex Grimaudo wrote 1 year 26 weeks ago

What an ingenious invention...too bad they don't make them anymore. And the fact that it is wood adds a ton of aesthetic value.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from buckhunter wrote 1 year 26 weeks ago

Have never seen a slip bobber designed to fish the bottom. Interesting concept. I do not believe there is anything on the market now that does the same thing. Probably too difficult to see at night and in choppy waves.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Charlie Woodman wrote 1 year 26 weeks ago

I have been thinking about just such a bobber for spin casting a fly . The thought is sometimes you just can't get a fly where you want it. I like to fish in deep pools so I tie on an emerger fly with 6-8 feet of line between the fly and bobber. I add a split shot.I then cast the rig above the pool so it floats into the pool. I let it come to rest somewhere in the pool and the fly sinks. After a short count i retrieve the rig for a few turns of the bale and the fly rises up like an emerger coming from the bottom.Then I let it sink again and repeat. It is very effective. This kind of bobber whould let the fly go to bottom getting it down where the biggies are.Hmmm , guess i'll work on it over the winter.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from buckhunter wrote 1 year 26 weeks ago

Charlie,

I like the way you think.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Tc505 wrote 1 year 26 weeks ago

charlie Woodman
the best thing I have found for this action you are wanting is a small stick float. have seen anglers using them with tube jigs as well. once cast they would twitch it making the jig dance. some of those will also slide up and act like the castglo. most will use a bobber stop bead but if wanting to fish deep bottom just let it slide down thru it. old time anglers weren't stupid, they came up with stuff that worked in their time like the torpedo, lucky 13 etc. and the stuff worked!!

0 Good Comment? | | Report

Post a Comment