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Learn to Spey Cast and Steal Your Buddy's Fish

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December 27, 2012

Learn to Spey Cast and Steal Your Buddy's Fish

By Joe Cermele

Try as I might, I have not yet managed to master spey casting. And it drives me crazy because I know, at least in certain situations, the benefits are tremendous and you can catch a lot more fish. Every time I give up in frustration, I find another reason to start practicing again. In the video below, guide Tom Larimer explains benefit 452 of spey casting. I'll call it long distance mugging.

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from clinchknot wrote 1 year 16 weeks ago

There is something to that, and why I soft hackle swing the fly a lot. Most hookups come from a considerable distance below you, and the fish sees not...your line, leader, or you up river. A real advantage in clear water, and in small streams where getting near the waters edge can often sppok fish. And another aspect . The strike is exciting everytime..small, or big fish.

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from Koldkut wrote 1 year 16 weeks ago

I've so got to try this on the Dream Stream spillway hole below the bridge, and hope like hell they can't cross the stream faster than I can run.

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from clinchknot wrote 1 year 16 weeks ago

When I fish with a buddy we often get out and fish the riffle water. I generally let my buddy go first, and start fishing about 30 yds above him. Doesn't take long to fish a spot, and then take a step, or two down. If my buddy doesn't want to move, and anchors himself in a spot, I swing a soft hackle just out in front of him. That's the body language sign to move.

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from haverodwilltravel wrote 1 year 15 weeks ago

The problem with "Two Handed and Switch Rod" fishing is, its all over the place. Try explaining Spey, Scandi, Skagit, Beach etc.. to someone and soon they get a headache.
I see very few folks who do any of them WELL.I believe one is better off getting a switch rod (A LONG ROD) of about 10 to 11 feet (and matching line)and learning a single and double Spey cast and just do that for season or two. THEN..you decide on which "Spey"(or what folks call Spey) direction best suits your fishing. Why? Because folks are being confused by the rod and line company terms so they run out and buy the wrong outfit for what they need. There is a HUGE difference between the classic Spey outfits of Europe and todays Loomis or Beulah two handed Beach Rods. It's like comparing ballet to clogging.
Some folks are trying to settle it down like RIO, but everytime they do, there is a new version that just confuses the beginer. Better to take a class with a Topher Brown or a Simon Gawesworth, explain what you want to do and where you fish and have them set you up with an outfit for that and give you some lessons.It really isn't hard once you have the right rig for what you want. The problem is what you want. Fancy roll casting or huck and duck. ;)

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from haverodwilltravel wrote 1 year 15 weeks ago

The problem with "Two Handed and Switch Rod" fishing is, its all over the place. Try explaining Spey, Scandi, Skagit, Beach etc.. to someone and soon they get a headache.
I see very few folks who do any of them WELL.I believe one is better off getting a switch rod (A LONG ROD) of about 10 to 11 feet (and matching line)and learning a single and double Spey cast and just do that for season or two. THEN..you decide on which "Spey"(or what folks call Spey) direction best suits your fishing. Why? Because folks are being confused by the rod and line company terms so they run out and buy the wrong outfit for what they need. There is a HUGE difference between the classic Spey outfits of Europe and todays Loomis or Beulah two handed Beach Rods. It's like comparing ballet to clogging.
Some folks are trying to settle it down like RIO, but everytime they do, there is a new version that just confuses the beginer. Better to take a class with a Topher Brown or a Simon Gawesworth, explain what you want to do and where you fish and have them set you up with an outfit for that and give you some lessons.It really isn't hard once you have the right rig for what you want. The problem is what you want. Fancy roll casting or huck and duck. ;)

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from clinchknot wrote 1 year 16 weeks ago

There is something to that, and why I soft hackle swing the fly a lot. Most hookups come from a considerable distance below you, and the fish sees not...your line, leader, or you up river. A real advantage in clear water, and in small streams where getting near the waters edge can often sppok fish. And another aspect . The strike is exciting everytime..small, or big fish.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Koldkut wrote 1 year 16 weeks ago

I've so got to try this on the Dream Stream spillway hole below the bridge, and hope like hell they can't cross the stream faster than I can run.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from clinchknot wrote 1 year 16 weeks ago

When I fish with a buddy we often get out and fish the riffle water. I generally let my buddy go first, and start fishing about 30 yds above him. Doesn't take long to fish a spot, and then take a step, or two down. If my buddy doesn't want to move, and anchors himself in a spot, I swing a soft hackle just out in front of him. That's the body language sign to move.

0 Good Comment? | | Report

Post a Comment