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April 22, 2010

Welcome to The Wild Chef, a New Blog on Field & Stream!

By Colin Kearns

If you’re like us (and we’re pretty certain you are), then you enjoy cooking and eating wild game and fish almost as much as you enjoy hunting and fishing. Almost. And it’s because of our love for all things rare, grilled, poached, fried, you name it, that we decided to serve a second helping of the magazine’s popular food column, The Wild Chef, in blog form on fieldandstream.com. You can check back each week for cooking tips, food news, stories, and, of course, some killer recipes.

But we want to include you as much as possible. We're looking for recipes from our readers, photo galleries of your camp cuisine, and will be running monthly contests in which you can win great prizes. After all, a good meal is always best when shared with friends, and we think this blog should be the same way.

On that note, we’d like to start this blog off right: with a recipe. This one comes from Robert Gelman, executive chef of NYY Steak in New York City (in Yankee Stadium, to be exact). Hopefully you’ll find the time to cook the dish this weekend. If you do, let us know how it turns out.

Rainbow Trout Stuffed with Lemon & Dill
A simple, rustic dish that any weekend recreational fisherman can execute, yet one which I feature on my menu at NYY Steak because of its clean flavors, which gives the dish a certain simple refinement that chefs everywhere yearn to capture. —Chef Robert Gelman

Ingredients:
One rainbow trout, approximately 1 pound
1 tsp. coarse sea salt
1 tsp. freshly ground black pepper
3 pieces of thinly sliced lemon
2 tbsp. of roughly chopped fresh dill
1 tbsp. of olive oil

1. Clean trout, scaling the fish and then removing head, gills, and bones, leaving both filets attached and intact with skin on
2.    After patting the fish dry, season both filet sides liberally with sea salt and black pepper.
3.    Lay lemon slices side by side on one of the filet sides.
4.    Top lemon slices with roughly chopped dill.
5.    Fold over the other filet on top of the lemon and dill.
6.    Heat oil in a sauté pan with large enough surface area to make contact with the entire length of the trout.
7.    When pan is near smoking hot, place trout in, searing the skin on one side of the fish, letting it get crispy.
8.    After a minute and a half, turn trout over, searing the second side of skin to crispy.
9.    The trout can then be finished in an oven for a minute or two, or simply continued to cook in the pan.
10.    Remove trout from pan and place in center of a plate. Drizzle a good quality olive oil over the skin on topside. As an accompaniment, try a nice crisp watercress salad, and a touch of crème fraîche.

Comments (24)

Top Rated
All Comments
from 60256 wrote 3 years 52 weeks ago

Now here's a new blog that I'm excited about!

Nate

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from jakenbake wrote 3 years 52 weeks ago

Agree, Nate -- hear hear!!

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from Mike Diehl wrote 3 years 52 weeks ago

Gotta question for the chef. I love hunting dove and the meat tastes good. Very flavorful. But no matter what I do it seems to come out as tough as a rubber ball. I can make almost any other kind of meat come out tender one way or another, but dove always comes out rock hard. What's the trick?

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from colinkearns wrote 3 years 52 weeks ago

Mike, thanks for the question. I'll get back to you on that asap.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from hengst wrote 3 years 51 weeks ago

Another great log from F&S..looking forward to the recipes and tips

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from jamesti wrote 3 years 51 weeks ago

how do you sign up for this one?

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from rudyglove27 wrote 3 years 51 weeks ago

About time Field and Stream..I been waiting for this and Thank you, it finally came!!!

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from mutt wrote 3 years 51 weeks ago

glad to see this and can you keep ingredients to stuff the average hunter can get / afford

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Walt Smith wrote 3 years 51 weeks ago

This is something we all can appreciate! I like trying wild game recipes as long as they bring the flavor of the game meat out and don't try to change it into something its not! Looking forward to more!

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from rock rat wrote 3 years 51 weeks ago

Sounds great! I love eating game almost as much as shooting it. I especially like eating the parts I'd never buy in the store, but with game I know they're clean and fresh.

Looking forward to pickled deer ear and soup from the contents of the first stomach of elk.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from yohan wrote 3 years 51 weeks ago

Boodyfull!!,. just freaking boodyfull!!
Claiming no special culinary ability beyond the
"I keep trying mentality "
This aughta be good.

Let the cooking begin.

And may I offer this one for grilld salmon.

One whole salmon small enough to fit on normal size weber grill. Think that about 20 inchs.

Gill & gut the fish , remove the head and rinse with cold water. Use a paper towel to remove excess moisture.

Put a good charge of granulated garlic and pepper in the cavity ,and some salt . then stuff with sliced lemons limes and onions .

Melt butter ( need not be clarified ( sp ?)
Wrap (truss) the fish with string to maintain shape and to help hold it to gether .
Wrap fish in foil, and twist ends such that the belly is 2/3 exposed facing up ( meaning fish is one its back) .

DO NOT WRAP TIGHTLY WITH FOIL !!
Meaning do not seal or crimp the edges.
Friend of mine had minnor explosion doing that.
Which actually set a staggard board privacy fence on fire.
Which,. aside from being dangerous , nearly caused ruptured arteries,.. srokes and the bursting of minor blood vessels .THis of course due to unabated and hysterical laughter.
But that was some time later and a beer or two after we put the fire out with a handy garden hose .
Thusly do not crimp or seal the fish inside the foil.

So with the fish stuffed trussed and wrapped in foil ,. on its back
put shirvil ( a spice ) or dill
in the melted butter ( 3/4 stick should do but again depending on fish size) poor melted butter in the fish cavity .
Useing indirect heat ( coles on both sides) place fish in the middle of grill belly up 2/3 exposed

Position grill such that you can slip wood chips down on the coles to impart smoke flavor .

I've done em uppward of 20lb like this and its great .
One woman I was seeing socially for a time said.
She had eaten in a number of three star resuruants and had tasted no better.
But that could have been poartially due to the fact she had ulterior motives ( naughty wench ) or enough wine to exacerbate turpitude or taste buds ( YUK YUK )

Cooking time will vary ,.. with the size of the fish . heat of the gril not to mention outside temperature .
But its hard to screw this up,.In that indirect methoed is pretty forgiving.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from yohan wrote 3 years 51 weeks ago

wuuups one last thing

Not long before you take the fish off the grill.

5-7 min ,.. use a fork with long tongs
or kabob scewer,. something long and sharp anyway
but not very wide.Every 3 inches or so
stick it down through the stuffing ( both sides of spine ) through the fishes back through the tin foil wraping .
Salmon is a fat fish ,. and the melted fat collected under the skin on the fishes back will drain .
If you havent cooked it to death,. fish will still be moist but with out all the fat which is where most of the PCB"S and other polutants collect.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from buckhunter wrote 3 years 51 weeks ago

This is gonna be a great blog. Cooking wild game is every outdoorsmans final destination of the hunt. It's only fitting we complete the circle and speak of cooking game.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from JNM86WVU wrote 3 years 51 weeks ago

I am VERY excited about this new blog.. I love to cook and I believe there is always something special/impressive about completing the cycle from scouting and hunting or finding that perfect fishing hole to cooking and eating it.. And I am looking forward to this new blog to help with new idea and maybe answering some question that may arise..

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from seadog wrote 3 years 51 weeks ago

My mouth is watering. I hunt. I fish. I cook. What's not to like?

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Sienkos wrote 3 years 51 weeks ago

I often cook my game that I hunt or if I'm around home the fish from our pond, and there is nothing better than a good fresh meal that you've worked for!

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Jim in Mo wrote 3 years 51 weeks ago

Welcome, We could use some good recipes. Hope you don't recommend cooking equipment we don't have.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from jerry1958 wrote 3 years 51 weeks ago

does that recipe work for lake trout to

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Arlo269 wrote 3 years 51 weeks ago

Wrap your Dove in Thick SliceD Bacon and soak in Dales or however you marinate it. The Bacon will take the abuse of the heat of the grill and leave the Dove so tender you can cut with a fork. This works for me everytime. I use a wood toothpick to hold the Bacon in place the grill burns the ends but not past the bacon wrap just remember to pull it before eating.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Sayfu wrote 3 years 51 weeks ago

I just thought of a good topic of discussion regarding length of fyrods and their effects on the casting arm. It seems apparent that rods beyond the length of 9ft. put added pressure on the elbow. I've seen several anglers over the years with their casting arms in a sling because of tendinitis of the elbow from casting the long rods. There is more wt., line wt., off the tip of the rod that puts the added pressure on the elbow. One guy was credited with developing the saltwater silver salmon fishery in the Seattle,Puget Sound region that fished out of a small boat casting to schools of feeding salmon. He ended up having to go back to the shorter rod.

-1 Good Comment? | | Report
from square_peg wrote 3 years 51 weeks ago

What a great idea for a new column. Good eating is why we hunt and fish. I'm really looking forward to future articles.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from square_peg wrote 3 years 51 weeks ago

And combining fish or game with other wild and foraged foods would be cool, too.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from muskiemaster wrote 3 years 51 weeks ago

I'm getting hungry just reading this, how bout the first give away is this meal

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Whitemaples wrote 3 years 50 weeks ago

This is a super idea. There have been some great recipes in past F&S issues. My problem is that the my past issues are spread out either at the hunting camp, fishing camp, garage, basement etc... Is there any way to cataloge those past recipes for easy access on line? It would add fuel to the fire!

0 Good Comment? | | Report

Post a Comment

from 60256 wrote 3 years 52 weeks ago

Now here's a new blog that I'm excited about!

Nate

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from jakenbake wrote 3 years 52 weeks ago

Agree, Nate -- hear hear!!

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from jamesti wrote 3 years 51 weeks ago

how do you sign up for this one?

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from rudyglove27 wrote 3 years 51 weeks ago

About time Field and Stream..I been waiting for this and Thank you, it finally came!!!

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from Mike Diehl wrote 3 years 52 weeks ago

Gotta question for the chef. I love hunting dove and the meat tastes good. Very flavorful. But no matter what I do it seems to come out as tough as a rubber ball. I can make almost any other kind of meat come out tender one way or another, but dove always comes out rock hard. What's the trick?

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from mutt wrote 3 years 51 weeks ago

glad to see this and can you keep ingredients to stuff the average hunter can get / afford

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Walt Smith wrote 3 years 51 weeks ago

This is something we all can appreciate! I like trying wild game recipes as long as they bring the flavor of the game meat out and don't try to change it into something its not! Looking forward to more!

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from buckhunter wrote 3 years 51 weeks ago

This is gonna be a great blog. Cooking wild game is every outdoorsmans final destination of the hunt. It's only fitting we complete the circle and speak of cooking game.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from seadog wrote 3 years 51 weeks ago

My mouth is watering. I hunt. I fish. I cook. What's not to like?

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Sienkos wrote 3 years 51 weeks ago

I often cook my game that I hunt or if I'm around home the fish from our pond, and there is nothing better than a good fresh meal that you've worked for!

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from colinkearns wrote 3 years 52 weeks ago

Mike, thanks for the question. I'll get back to you on that asap.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from hengst wrote 3 years 51 weeks ago

Another great log from F&S..looking forward to the recipes and tips

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from rock rat wrote 3 years 51 weeks ago

Sounds great! I love eating game almost as much as shooting it. I especially like eating the parts I'd never buy in the store, but with game I know they're clean and fresh.

Looking forward to pickled deer ear and soup from the contents of the first stomach of elk.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from yohan wrote 3 years 51 weeks ago

Boodyfull!!,. just freaking boodyfull!!
Claiming no special culinary ability beyond the
"I keep trying mentality "
This aughta be good.

Let the cooking begin.

And may I offer this one for grilld salmon.

One whole salmon small enough to fit on normal size weber grill. Think that about 20 inchs.

Gill & gut the fish , remove the head and rinse with cold water. Use a paper towel to remove excess moisture.

Put a good charge of granulated garlic and pepper in the cavity ,and some salt . then stuff with sliced lemons limes and onions .

Melt butter ( need not be clarified ( sp ?)
Wrap (truss) the fish with string to maintain shape and to help hold it to gether .
Wrap fish in foil, and twist ends such that the belly is 2/3 exposed facing up ( meaning fish is one its back) .

DO NOT WRAP TIGHTLY WITH FOIL !!
Meaning do not seal or crimp the edges.
Friend of mine had minnor explosion doing that.
Which actually set a staggard board privacy fence on fire.
Which,. aside from being dangerous , nearly caused ruptured arteries,.. srokes and the bursting of minor blood vessels .THis of course due to unabated and hysterical laughter.
But that was some time later and a beer or two after we put the fire out with a handy garden hose .
Thusly do not crimp or seal the fish inside the foil.

So with the fish stuffed trussed and wrapped in foil ,. on its back
put shirvil ( a spice ) or dill
in the melted butter ( 3/4 stick should do but again depending on fish size) poor melted butter in the fish cavity .
Useing indirect heat ( coles on both sides) place fish in the middle of grill belly up 2/3 exposed

Position grill such that you can slip wood chips down on the coles to impart smoke flavor .

I've done em uppward of 20lb like this and its great .
One woman I was seeing socially for a time said.
She had eaten in a number of three star resuruants and had tasted no better.
But that could have been poartially due to the fact she had ulterior motives ( naughty wench ) or enough wine to exacerbate turpitude or taste buds ( YUK YUK )

Cooking time will vary ,.. with the size of the fish . heat of the gril not to mention outside temperature .
But its hard to screw this up,.In that indirect methoed is pretty forgiving.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from JNM86WVU wrote 3 years 51 weeks ago

I am VERY excited about this new blog.. I love to cook and I believe there is always something special/impressive about completing the cycle from scouting and hunting or finding that perfect fishing hole to cooking and eating it.. And I am looking forward to this new blog to help with new idea and maybe answering some question that may arise..

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Jim in Mo wrote 3 years 51 weeks ago

Welcome, We could use some good recipes. Hope you don't recommend cooking equipment we don't have.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from jerry1958 wrote 3 years 51 weeks ago

does that recipe work for lake trout to

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from square_peg wrote 3 years 51 weeks ago

And combining fish or game with other wild and foraged foods would be cool, too.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from yohan wrote 3 years 51 weeks ago

wuuups one last thing

Not long before you take the fish off the grill.

5-7 min ,.. use a fork with long tongs
or kabob scewer,. something long and sharp anyway
but not very wide.Every 3 inches or so
stick it down through the stuffing ( both sides of spine ) through the fishes back through the tin foil wraping .
Salmon is a fat fish ,. and the melted fat collected under the skin on the fishes back will drain .
If you havent cooked it to death,. fish will still be moist but with out all the fat which is where most of the PCB"S and other polutants collect.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Arlo269 wrote 3 years 51 weeks ago

Wrap your Dove in Thick SliceD Bacon and soak in Dales or however you marinate it. The Bacon will take the abuse of the heat of the grill and leave the Dove so tender you can cut with a fork. This works for me everytime. I use a wood toothpick to hold the Bacon in place the grill burns the ends but not past the bacon wrap just remember to pull it before eating.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from square_peg wrote 3 years 51 weeks ago

What a great idea for a new column. Good eating is why we hunt and fish. I'm really looking forward to future articles.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from muskiemaster wrote 3 years 51 weeks ago

I'm getting hungry just reading this, how bout the first give away is this meal

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Whitemaples wrote 3 years 50 weeks ago

This is a super idea. There have been some great recipes in past F&S issues. My problem is that the my past issues are spread out either at the hunting camp, fishing camp, garage, basement etc... Is there any way to cataloge those past recipes for easy access on line? It would add fuel to the fire!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Sayfu wrote 3 years 51 weeks ago

I just thought of a good topic of discussion regarding length of fyrods and their effects on the casting arm. It seems apparent that rods beyond the length of 9ft. put added pressure on the elbow. I've seen several anglers over the years with their casting arms in a sling because of tendinitis of the elbow from casting the long rods. There is more wt., line wt., off the tip of the rod that puts the added pressure on the elbow. One guy was credited with developing the saltwater silver salmon fishery in the Seattle,Puget Sound region that fished out of a small boat casting to schools of feeding salmon. He ended up having to go back to the shorter rod.

-1 Good Comment? | | Report

Post a Comment