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Shoot Me Down: You Should Kill and Tell (the Landowner, That Is)

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July 19, 2010

Shoot Me Down: You Should Kill and Tell (the Landowner, That Is)

By Scott Bestul

I have a buddy who might have lost a great hunting spot. He thinks he made a big mistake last fall when he showed a big buck he arrowed to the landowner. The farmer took a photo and started waving it in front of his buddies. Before long, word spread and another hunter showed up at the farmer’s door, waving a checkbook.

“I should have just snuck that buck out of there and been on my way,” my friend lamented. “I’d probably still be hunting there.”

When I heard this, I thought of some advice given to me years ago by another friend and hugely successful whitetail hunter. “The quickest way to get booted off a place is to show the farmer the big buck you shot,” he warned. “Landowners are funny that way; lots of them are happy to let you hunt. . . . They just don’t want you killing anything.”

That may be true, but I can’t go along. My problem is that it involves sneaking around on the person kind enough to let me hunt. Bottom line, it seems like a deception. Now I may not always go way out of my way to show every deer I kill to a property owner, but I’ve never gone out of my way not to. If the landowner is handy, I’ll stop in and say thanks. If that results in my losing permission, well I won’t like it, naturally, but I can live with myself easier. Of course, I may be all wet. You tell me. I say you should show your buck to the landowner. Stand with me or shoot me down. - Scott Bestul

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from Outsider wrote 3 years 38 weeks ago

I have never understood the logic of some...You shoot a big buck, he is dead and gone, word gets out, and people want to flock to the area where the big buck is not any more...And to answer the question, yes i would show the deer/photo to the landowner common courtesy.

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from flashal wrote 3 years 38 weeks ago

Perhaps my situation is somewhat different as I hunt in Alberta, where access is not often an issue. As it is illegal to pay for access, permission to hunt on private land has much more to do with relationships that cheque books. To that end, I find that if the land owner is a hunter (or appreciates hunting) I will make a point of showing my animal to them when I thank them. If they do not get enjoyment from seeing the animal taken on their property, a simple thank you and some deer sausage is in order. Final word - I agree with you.

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from Nebraskahunter18 wrote 3 years 38 weeks ago

Send him/her a thank you and some deer sausge and tell him/her you shot a nice deer and thank you

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from buckhunter wrote 3 years 38 weeks ago

Deceptive is the correct word. It would be even worse if the landowner found out from someone else that a big buck was killed on his property. You should tell the landowner you harvested a buck off his property and reward him with some meat. A THANK YOU is the very least a landowner deserves.

If your buddies ask where you shot your buck... lie lie lie. I usually pick a spot at least 5 miles from the actual location. It's all cool. They also lie to me.

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from jcarlin wrote 3 years 38 weeks ago

Can't do it. They deserve to see and a share of venison UNLESS you're paying for a lease.

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from jbird wrote 3 years 38 weeks ago

I feel your pain. My good friend gives me permission to hunt his family's 560 acres. It's paradise, but the 'hunt clubs' are a knockin', and I know if/when I shoot a big buck on there, my 'paradise' is most definitely going to be lost to a lease. But, he's a great friend, and I always tell him about the deer I harvest. I was kinda' glad I didn't shoot a big buck on his land this year though.

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from MPN wrote 3 years 38 weeks ago

I have my own property and if I was to allow someone to hunt my land it would be required that they let me know if they took a deer, or whatever they were hunting.

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from gman3186 wrote 3 years 38 weeks ago

we are pretty lucky the land owner welcomes us with open arms and we have access to all three of his properties, we don’t go out our way to show him every deer but we do make sure he gets some meat and we he does see the deer we killed he gives us a big thumbs up keeps going on his way, he is a real stand up guy we go to him all the time and ask where the big buck is this year and he tells us right where he has seen him and I cant put it in words how much it means to me that he allows us to hunt there if it wasn’t for him I wouldn’t have anywhere to hunt for the fact like talked about in the article peoples check book is alittle larger than mine

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from woodsmanj35 wrote 3 years 38 weeks ago

heck yes I'll tell the land owner, If he gives someone else permission to hunt there than that's fine, I already killed my buck. He would probably would be more likely to give someone else permission to there if he saw me sneak away with a deer and I didn't say anything to him. Than if I bring him some steaks and thank him.

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from shane wrote 3 years 38 weeks ago

You can be honest and tell the landowner that you got a buck on their land, but you shouldn't go waving your trophies around...that's just asking for it. Very few people know about the bucks I've killed.

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from jjas wrote 3 years 38 weeks ago

I think this is one of those d*mned if you do, d*mned if you don't situations.

I'd tell the truth and offer to lease his property before someone else does.

Since you already have permission, you might get a good deal.

If not, and the property gets leased out from under you, get used to it. 21st century deer hunting is about big bucks (both deer and cash).

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from finnyk wrote 3 years 38 weeks ago

I know of a landowner who asks to be informed of the kills. He allows bowhunting only on the property, and wants to make sure that policy is strictly adhered to. I think this is one of those areas that courtesy and respect to the landowner makes the decision. If someone is kind enough to grant free access, then heck yes, let them know. If you have worked out a lease on the property, there is nothing wrong with including that particular issue in the terms of the lease and putting it on paper. That way there is no confusion between you and the landowner and everything can run smoothly. However, even if the landowner doesn't necessarily want to know, I see absolutely nothing wrong with volunteering a look at a trophy and offering some of the venison as a thank you.

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from seadog wrote 3 years 38 weeks ago

I think it depends on your relationship with the landowner. If you have to "sneak" the game off his property, that's dishonest--that's wrong, so I stand with you. If the landowner doesn't ask or care, it might be different. Still, if you hunt his land for free, you should at least offer him some meat so you're gonna tell him anyway.

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from Walt Smith wrote 3 years 38 weeks ago

You have to show the animal to the owner, its the right thing to do. If you don't you look like a sneaky S.O.B. and you make the owner wonder what else you're hiding! When everyone asks where you got it and where you hunt thats when you tell them, "On State Ground" with a big ole smile.

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from FirstBubba wrote 3 years 38 weeks ago

"My" landowner allows me to hunt because he doesn't want anybody else to hunt them. He knows I'll take care of the place. I've killed prairie dogs, feral hogs, deer and even put down a crippled up cow for him. Any hog hits the ground, I smoke him either a loin and shoulder or ham. If a deer hits the dirt, he gets at least two packages of loin. At the end of the season, he gets at least ten pounds of ground!
He gets food that costs' him nothing!
I've got places to hunt that cost me nothing!
It's all good!

Bubba

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from countitandone wrote 3 years 38 weeks ago

Show your buck to farmer Brown? No. A simple "thank you sir for the hunt" and next time I see you I'll have a couple venison roasts for you...and my favorite receipe too!

Honesty is the best policy. You should "kill and tell," but why go into detail?

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from MLH wrote 3 years 38 weeks ago

Tell and bear it.

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from jenks wrote 3 years 38 weeks ago

Well I have got to agree with flashal. I live in Saskatchewan not Alberta but I love the fact that money does not rule the access up here. There is posted land but it is either just the hunters wanting to force you to come and ask so they know who is on their land or they are trying to manage their property for themselves which I believe is fair game becuase they do own the land and have the right to do with it what they want. Having said this by all means I would show him the buck on my way out and they after the jerky/pepperoni is made you should take a pack over and a nice cold case of brew and say thank you over the treats and some more good hunting stories.

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from Hank111 wrote 3 years 38 weeks ago

Like Walt said, if he is interested you cant try to gloss over the detail of how big a buck it was, eventually they will find out, then the trust and probably your free hunting will be gone.If they also hunt, they would want to know, if not they wont care, if its worth leaseing someones gonna make an offer eventually and unless you can match it your out anyway.

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from FirstBubba wrote 3 years 38 weeks ago

When landowner first allowed me to hunt, I asked him if he had ever eaten venison. He claimed he had been given some home made jerky and it was good, but he had never had it any other way.
About the third trip to one of his spots, I finally made contact.
When I delivered the butterflies to his home, his wife asked how to prepare.
"Well, just like you would prepare a chicken fried steak. Batter and fry! Done but not cremated!"
Next morning, phone rings.
"If you shoot one and he falls off that bluff, you just let me know and we (he and helper) will come help you get him out! That stuff is delicious!"

If telling landowner what you've killed tic's 'em off, you don't need to be hunting there anyway!!

Bubba

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from 007 wrote 3 years 38 weeks ago

One of the best deer and turkey hunters I ever knew, whom I learned a lot from, taught me to NEVER tell anybody too much of anything unless you want lots of company there the next time. Therefore, I always told my kids that while you don't out and out lie, you never tell where you're hearing the gobblers, seeing the big bucks, finding the mushrooms, where the best trout stocking was, etc. We call it creative exageration.

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from FirstBubba wrote 3 years 38 weeks ago

007

I agree with that!
You don't reveal ALL your secrets!
If you're leasing your hunting ground, you've paid for the priviledge to hunt. As long as you stay within the confines of the law and lease agreement, you don't owe landowner any more than what's in agreement.
If you've been "given" (freely!) the priviledge to hunt a private __(ranch, farm, woodlot, etc, etc), then the landowner deserves the right to know what is taken! If the owner/overseer isn't interested, and they will let you know, then don't worry about it.

Bubba

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from jfgann66 wrote 3 years 38 weeks ago

Honesty is the best policy in everything except deer hunting. I have really missed some good bucks due to my inability to keep my big mouth shut. Everyone from my uncle to my best friend has done it to me. Perfect strangers and friends of friends all seem to find my stand after I let the cat out of the bag that I have seen or killed a big buck. One year someone came to my stand and told me that I was hunting in his spot not to mention that this was a lease I had been on for 10 years and this was a new member. I am ready to buy my own land and hunt by my self. Lease prices are going up exponentialy every year soon hunting will be a rich mans sport and that is very sad. I call it the unintional result of QDM.

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from fliphuntr14 wrote 3 years 38 weeks ago

i hunted my neighbors forty, 2 years ago and i shot a doe and told him where my stand was. Then last year i go to ask for permission and i can only hunt half the property because his nephew is hunting the other half where my spot was. Not just the other half but hanging a stand in the same tree i was in when i looked.

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from steve182 wrote 3 years 38 weeks ago

In my opinion, you should never lie or conceal your kill from the landowner IF he wants to know about it,... but if he is indifferent as many farmers are, why go out of your way to show him a big buck? Of course you tell him you shot one, but if he's not there why go knocking on his door to show him? Many farmers who've let me hunt aren't interested in sharing the meat, they just want deer shot. The quality of the deer you shoot is irrelevant unless the landowner wants to see it. Otherwise get the heck outta there!

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from jamesti wrote 3 years 38 weeks ago

if he asks, show him the buck. if he doesn't send him some steaks.

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from logan.vandermay wrote 3 years 38 weeks ago

Speakding as a landowner, I think you should tell them if they are interested and if they aren't and you don't see them on your way out don't worry about it. Personally if someone shootsa big deer on my land I want to see it and would be unhappy if they didnt show it to me. I love to hunt myself and like looking at big deer no matter who shoots them.

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from Don Mitchell wrote 3 years 38 weeks ago

I agree with Logon V.,I would not go out of my way to say any thing,but if he or she ask,thin I would tell.

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from Sharkfin wrote 3 years 38 weeks ago

I have mixed feelings about this. First, I would be so appreciative to have free land to hunt I wouldn't want to be deceptive. That being said, unless the landowner specifically states that they want to see what you kill then I'd probably keep it quiet. I wouldn't go out of my way either way. I would just pack it up and leave and if I saw the landowner then so be it. If they asked I'd tell them I shot a decent buck but I wouldn't go crazy about it. I definitely wouldn't tell anyone else where I shot it. The thing is, it's their land but not their deer. Unless the property is really huge it could have been killed on any of the surrounding properties. I'm in a club and I do tell the other members where I kill big bucks. I don't tell them where I see them just where I kill them.

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from WA Mtnhunter wrote 3 years 38 weeks ago

Shoot you down this time, Scott.

While I would not lie to the landowner, I would not go out of my way to show off a big buck. I would touch base with him and let him know that I had a good hunt and appreciate his hospitality. I would find out if he wanted to share some venison in advance of the hunt to preclude that conversation at the end of the hunt.

I share my best locations on the ranch we hunt with other hunters in our group. I want everyone to get their bull and/or buck during our hunt. I have a couple of honey holes that I hunt on public land that I don't share with others. I found them the shoe leather way, so I figure others can as well. In fact, I know other hunters have been there because of the 'trash sign' left behind.

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from Del in KS wrote 3 years 38 weeks ago

Funny this should come up. Yesterday got word that 2 of my hunting spots are gone for this season. Guess we took too many deer for the jealous neighbors. I let the landowner know if successful. Never brag about the size of the buck or even show him off unless they ask to see.

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from deadeyedick wrote 3 years 38 weeks ago

I SURELY WOULD TELL HIM !! HUNTER/LANDOWNER RELATIONS ARE VERY IMPORTANT TO ALL HUNTERS NOT JUST YOURSELF. EACH YEAR I HEAR OF LOST PERMISSON SLIPS DUE TO POOR RELATIONS WITH THE LANDOWNER. (OHIO REQUIRES WRITTEN PERMISSION SLIPS) AS FAR AS I'M CONCERNED I CANNOT DO ENOUGH FOR THE PEOPLE ON WHOSE LAND I HUNT. I AM SURE THAT MOST LANDOWNERS WOULD LOVE TO SHARE IN YOUR ADVENTURES ON HIS PROPERTY INCLUDING THE NEWS OF A TROPHY BUCK TAKEN ON HIS LAND.

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from jeffisutherland wrote 3 years 38 weeks ago

Where me and my dad go hunting in Manitoba, we have a standing invitation to hunt on one farmer's spread. We consider him a good friend and always make it a point to bring him a couple bottles of nice wine, as well as reporting on the hunting when we're leaving. I agree that it is important to inform the landowner that you have harvested a deer or any animal on their land. You never know, they could have been keeping an eye on that huge buck, and will wonder what has happened to it!

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from Aaron Williams wrote 3 years 38 weeks ago

I definitely agree with the post. Deception is a sure fire way to ruin a good relationship. If and when I do show a landowner my trophy buck I am always sure to tell him how grateful I am to have hunted on his place. Anything that I can do to make that relationship stronger works out better for both parties.

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from Lefty049 wrote 3 years 38 weeks ago

This is pretty silly arguement. Sneaking around is going to do you no good in the end. If it's not the landowner that dislikes it it will be a jealous son in law or nephew. Those are the ones you have to watch out for. Show the landowner, offer to share a little meat or maybe send a fruit basket or something. He's going to find out anyway. I know several landowners that no longer hunt due to their age not a lack of wanting to. Let them participate a little if you can. You'll get some good stories out of it too.

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from buck20 wrote 3 years 38 weeks ago

Well I'm gonna stand with you all the way but I would still say "Hey, I got a deer (whether it's buck or doe) thanks for letting me use your property!"

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from TOMCOYOTE8 wrote 3 years 37 weeks ago

I hunt in Kansas on three different properties.I and a few of my buddies have taken some monster bucks.We always show them to the land owner.There response is always the same,I've seen a bigger one.You have permission show them and thank them.They all know they could Leese the land.

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from Gritz wrote 3 years 37 weeks ago

I hunt my father's farm every opening weekend and most of the season. I have never shot a decent buck. Mostly an abundance of does. He lets his nephew hunt this land during bow season and every year he takes out a nice size buck. This urks me to no end only because this nephew also owns his own 100 acres of prime woodland but doesn't bow hunt it because he "Grows" his deer for trophies and would never let anyone else hunt it either. I try not to let it get to me and just enjoy the freedom of having the family farm to hunt on. I guess the real point is, if I did not know about this or see the pictures I would not think anything of it and would be much happier. If someone asked if I wanted to know I could not stop myself from saying I would. So this is a case of too much information. I think it sums up what people are saying. Yeah, go ahead and be honest, but don't go into detail unless pushed. Even if we try to take to high ground it breaks our hearts a little bit because deep down there is something competitive about hunting that gets to every hunter no matter how altruistic they try to be.

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from BuckBoss wrote 3 years 33 weeks ago

Well, I had a similar situation happen to me. Last fall I shot a great buck with my bow on the property I hunt. Naturally I was excited and showed the landowner. Word spread of my deer and now I am competing with several others for hunting privileges on the property. I do always give a bunch of meat to the landowner but obviously he isn't too loyal to me. So, should I shoot another good deer there this year I will think twice before showing him...

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from buckhunter wrote 3 years 38 weeks ago

Deceptive is the correct word. It would be even worse if the landowner found out from someone else that a big buck was killed on his property. You should tell the landowner you harvested a buck off his property and reward him with some meat. A THANK YOU is the very least a landowner deserves.

If your buddies ask where you shot your buck... lie lie lie. I usually pick a spot at least 5 miles from the actual location. It's all cool. They also lie to me.

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from logan.vandermay wrote 3 years 38 weeks ago

Speakding as a landowner, I think you should tell them if they are interested and if they aren't and you don't see them on your way out don't worry about it. Personally if someone shootsa big deer on my land I want to see it and would be unhappy if they didnt show it to me. I love to hunt myself and like looking at big deer no matter who shoots them.

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from Outsider wrote 3 years 38 weeks ago

I have never understood the logic of some...You shoot a big buck, he is dead and gone, word gets out, and people want to flock to the area where the big buck is not any more...And to answer the question, yes i would show the deer/photo to the landowner common courtesy.

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from MPN wrote 3 years 38 weeks ago

I have my own property and if I was to allow someone to hunt my land it would be required that they let me know if they took a deer, or whatever they were hunting.

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from gman3186 wrote 3 years 38 weeks ago

we are pretty lucky the land owner welcomes us with open arms and we have access to all three of his properties, we don’t go out our way to show him every deer but we do make sure he gets some meat and we he does see the deer we killed he gives us a big thumbs up keeps going on his way, he is a real stand up guy we go to him all the time and ask where the big buck is this year and he tells us right where he has seen him and I cant put it in words how much it means to me that he allows us to hunt there if it wasn’t for him I wouldn’t have anywhere to hunt for the fact like talked about in the article peoples check book is alittle larger than mine

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from woodsmanj35 wrote 3 years 38 weeks ago

heck yes I'll tell the land owner, If he gives someone else permission to hunt there than that's fine, I already killed my buck. He would probably would be more likely to give someone else permission to there if he saw me sneak away with a deer and I didn't say anything to him. Than if I bring him some steaks and thank him.

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from FirstBubba wrote 3 years 38 weeks ago

"My" landowner allows me to hunt because he doesn't want anybody else to hunt them. He knows I'll take care of the place. I've killed prairie dogs, feral hogs, deer and even put down a crippled up cow for him. Any hog hits the ground, I smoke him either a loin and shoulder or ham. If a deer hits the dirt, he gets at least two packages of loin. At the end of the season, he gets at least ten pounds of ground!
He gets food that costs' him nothing!
I've got places to hunt that cost me nothing!
It's all good!

Bubba

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from countitandone wrote 3 years 38 weeks ago

Show your buck to farmer Brown? No. A simple "thank you sir for the hunt" and next time I see you I'll have a couple venison roasts for you...and my favorite receipe too!

Honesty is the best policy. You should "kill and tell," but why go into detail?

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from FirstBubba wrote 3 years 38 weeks ago

When landowner first allowed me to hunt, I asked him if he had ever eaten venison. He claimed he had been given some home made jerky and it was good, but he had never had it any other way.
About the third trip to one of his spots, I finally made contact.
When I delivered the butterflies to his home, his wife asked how to prepare.
"Well, just like you would prepare a chicken fried steak. Batter and fry! Done but not cremated!"
Next morning, phone rings.
"If you shoot one and he falls off that bluff, you just let me know and we (he and helper) will come help you get him out! That stuff is delicious!"

If telling landowner what you've killed tic's 'em off, you don't need to be hunting there anyway!!

Bubba

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from jamesti wrote 3 years 38 weeks ago

if he asks, show him the buck. if he doesn't send him some steaks.

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from deadeyedick wrote 3 years 38 weeks ago

I SURELY WOULD TELL HIM !! HUNTER/LANDOWNER RELATIONS ARE VERY IMPORTANT TO ALL HUNTERS NOT JUST YOURSELF. EACH YEAR I HEAR OF LOST PERMISSON SLIPS DUE TO POOR RELATIONS WITH THE LANDOWNER. (OHIO REQUIRES WRITTEN PERMISSION SLIPS) AS FAR AS I'M CONCERNED I CANNOT DO ENOUGH FOR THE PEOPLE ON WHOSE LAND I HUNT. I AM SURE THAT MOST LANDOWNERS WOULD LOVE TO SHARE IN YOUR ADVENTURES ON HIS PROPERTY INCLUDING THE NEWS OF A TROPHY BUCK TAKEN ON HIS LAND.

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from jeffisutherland wrote 3 years 38 weeks ago

Where me and my dad go hunting in Manitoba, we have a standing invitation to hunt on one farmer's spread. We consider him a good friend and always make it a point to bring him a couple bottles of nice wine, as well as reporting on the hunting when we're leaving. I agree that it is important to inform the landowner that you have harvested a deer or any animal on their land. You never know, they could have been keeping an eye on that huge buck, and will wonder what has happened to it!

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from BuckBoss wrote 3 years 33 weeks ago

Well, I had a similar situation happen to me. Last fall I shot a great buck with my bow on the property I hunt. Naturally I was excited and showed the landowner. Word spread of my deer and now I am competing with several others for hunting privileges on the property. I do always give a bunch of meat to the landowner but obviously he isn't too loyal to me. So, should I shoot another good deer there this year I will think twice before showing him...

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from flashal wrote 3 years 38 weeks ago

Perhaps my situation is somewhat different as I hunt in Alberta, where access is not often an issue. As it is illegal to pay for access, permission to hunt on private land has much more to do with relationships that cheque books. To that end, I find that if the land owner is a hunter (or appreciates hunting) I will make a point of showing my animal to them when I thank them. If they do not get enjoyment from seeing the animal taken on their property, a simple thank you and some deer sausage is in order. Final word - I agree with you.

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from Nebraskahunter18 wrote 3 years 38 weeks ago

Send him/her a thank you and some deer sausge and tell him/her you shot a nice deer and thank you

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from jcarlin wrote 3 years 38 weeks ago

Can't do it. They deserve to see and a share of venison UNLESS you're paying for a lease.

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from jbird wrote 3 years 38 weeks ago

I feel your pain. My good friend gives me permission to hunt his family's 560 acres. It's paradise, but the 'hunt clubs' are a knockin', and I know if/when I shoot a big buck on there, my 'paradise' is most definitely going to be lost to a lease. But, he's a great friend, and I always tell him about the deer I harvest. I was kinda' glad I didn't shoot a big buck on his land this year though.

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from shane wrote 3 years 38 weeks ago

You can be honest and tell the landowner that you got a buck on their land, but you shouldn't go waving your trophies around...that's just asking for it. Very few people know about the bucks I've killed.

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from jjas wrote 3 years 38 weeks ago

I think this is one of those d*mned if you do, d*mned if you don't situations.

I'd tell the truth and offer to lease his property before someone else does.

Since you already have permission, you might get a good deal.

If not, and the property gets leased out from under you, get used to it. 21st century deer hunting is about big bucks (both deer and cash).

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from finnyk wrote 3 years 38 weeks ago

I know of a landowner who asks to be informed of the kills. He allows bowhunting only on the property, and wants to make sure that policy is strictly adhered to. I think this is one of those areas that courtesy and respect to the landowner makes the decision. If someone is kind enough to grant free access, then heck yes, let them know. If you have worked out a lease on the property, there is nothing wrong with including that particular issue in the terms of the lease and putting it on paper. That way there is no confusion between you and the landowner and everything can run smoothly. However, even if the landowner doesn't necessarily want to know, I see absolutely nothing wrong with volunteering a look at a trophy and offering some of the venison as a thank you.

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from seadog wrote 3 years 38 weeks ago

I think it depends on your relationship with the landowner. If you have to "sneak" the game off his property, that's dishonest--that's wrong, so I stand with you. If the landowner doesn't ask or care, it might be different. Still, if you hunt his land for free, you should at least offer him some meat so you're gonna tell him anyway.

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from Walt Smith wrote 3 years 38 weeks ago

You have to show the animal to the owner, its the right thing to do. If you don't you look like a sneaky S.O.B. and you make the owner wonder what else you're hiding! When everyone asks where you got it and where you hunt thats when you tell them, "On State Ground" with a big ole smile.

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from MLH wrote 3 years 38 weeks ago

Tell and bear it.

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from jenks wrote 3 years 38 weeks ago

Well I have got to agree with flashal. I live in Saskatchewan not Alberta but I love the fact that money does not rule the access up here. There is posted land but it is either just the hunters wanting to force you to come and ask so they know who is on their land or they are trying to manage their property for themselves which I believe is fair game becuase they do own the land and have the right to do with it what they want. Having said this by all means I would show him the buck on my way out and they after the jerky/pepperoni is made you should take a pack over and a nice cold case of brew and say thank you over the treats and some more good hunting stories.

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from Hank111 wrote 3 years 38 weeks ago

Like Walt said, if he is interested you cant try to gloss over the detail of how big a buck it was, eventually they will find out, then the trust and probably your free hunting will be gone.If they also hunt, they would want to know, if not they wont care, if its worth leaseing someones gonna make an offer eventually and unless you can match it your out anyway.

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from 007 wrote 3 years 38 weeks ago

One of the best deer and turkey hunters I ever knew, whom I learned a lot from, taught me to NEVER tell anybody too much of anything unless you want lots of company there the next time. Therefore, I always told my kids that while you don't out and out lie, you never tell where you're hearing the gobblers, seeing the big bucks, finding the mushrooms, where the best trout stocking was, etc. We call it creative exageration.

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from FirstBubba wrote 3 years 38 weeks ago

007

I agree with that!
You don't reveal ALL your secrets!
If you're leasing your hunting ground, you've paid for the priviledge to hunt. As long as you stay within the confines of the law and lease agreement, you don't owe landowner any more than what's in agreement.
If you've been "given" (freely!) the priviledge to hunt a private __(ranch, farm, woodlot, etc, etc), then the landowner deserves the right to know what is taken! If the owner/overseer isn't interested, and they will let you know, then don't worry about it.

Bubba

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from jfgann66 wrote 3 years 38 weeks ago

Honesty is the best policy in everything except deer hunting. I have really missed some good bucks due to my inability to keep my big mouth shut. Everyone from my uncle to my best friend has done it to me. Perfect strangers and friends of friends all seem to find my stand after I let the cat out of the bag that I have seen or killed a big buck. One year someone came to my stand and told me that I was hunting in his spot not to mention that this was a lease I had been on for 10 years and this was a new member. I am ready to buy my own land and hunt by my self. Lease prices are going up exponentialy every year soon hunting will be a rich mans sport and that is very sad. I call it the unintional result of QDM.

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from fliphuntr14 wrote 3 years 38 weeks ago

i hunted my neighbors forty, 2 years ago and i shot a doe and told him where my stand was. Then last year i go to ask for permission and i can only hunt half the property because his nephew is hunting the other half where my spot was. Not just the other half but hanging a stand in the same tree i was in when i looked.

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from steve182 wrote 3 years 38 weeks ago

In my opinion, you should never lie or conceal your kill from the landowner IF he wants to know about it,... but if he is indifferent as many farmers are, why go out of your way to show him a big buck? Of course you tell him you shot one, but if he's not there why go knocking on his door to show him? Many farmers who've let me hunt aren't interested in sharing the meat, they just want deer shot. The quality of the deer you shoot is irrelevant unless the landowner wants to see it. Otherwise get the heck outta there!

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from Don Mitchell wrote 3 years 38 weeks ago

I agree with Logon V.,I would not go out of my way to say any thing,but if he or she ask,thin I would tell.

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from Sharkfin wrote 3 years 38 weeks ago

I have mixed feelings about this. First, I would be so appreciative to have free land to hunt I wouldn't want to be deceptive. That being said, unless the landowner specifically states that they want to see what you kill then I'd probably keep it quiet. I wouldn't go out of my way either way. I would just pack it up and leave and if I saw the landowner then so be it. If they asked I'd tell them I shot a decent buck but I wouldn't go crazy about it. I definitely wouldn't tell anyone else where I shot it. The thing is, it's their land but not their deer. Unless the property is really huge it could have been killed on any of the surrounding properties. I'm in a club and I do tell the other members where I kill big bucks. I don't tell them where I see them just where I kill them.

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from WA Mtnhunter wrote 3 years 38 weeks ago

Shoot you down this time, Scott.

While I would not lie to the landowner, I would not go out of my way to show off a big buck. I would touch base with him and let him know that I had a good hunt and appreciate his hospitality. I would find out if he wanted to share some venison in advance of the hunt to preclude that conversation at the end of the hunt.

I share my best locations on the ranch we hunt with other hunters in our group. I want everyone to get their bull and/or buck during our hunt. I have a couple of honey holes that I hunt on public land that I don't share with others. I found them the shoe leather way, so I figure others can as well. In fact, I know other hunters have been there because of the 'trash sign' left behind.

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from Del in KS wrote 3 years 38 weeks ago

Funny this should come up. Yesterday got word that 2 of my hunting spots are gone for this season. Guess we took too many deer for the jealous neighbors. I let the landowner know if successful. Never brag about the size of the buck or even show him off unless they ask to see.

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from Aaron Williams wrote 3 years 38 weeks ago

I definitely agree with the post. Deception is a sure fire way to ruin a good relationship. If and when I do show a landowner my trophy buck I am always sure to tell him how grateful I am to have hunted on his place. Anything that I can do to make that relationship stronger works out better for both parties.

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from Lefty049 wrote 3 years 38 weeks ago

This is pretty silly arguement. Sneaking around is going to do you no good in the end. If it's not the landowner that dislikes it it will be a jealous son in law or nephew. Those are the ones you have to watch out for. Show the landowner, offer to share a little meat or maybe send a fruit basket or something. He's going to find out anyway. I know several landowners that no longer hunt due to their age not a lack of wanting to. Let them participate a little if you can. You'll get some good stories out of it too.

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from buck20 wrote 3 years 38 weeks ago

Well I'm gonna stand with you all the way but I would still say "Hey, I got a deer (whether it's buck or doe) thanks for letting me use your property!"

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from TOMCOYOTE8 wrote 3 years 37 weeks ago

I hunt in Kansas on three different properties.I and a few of my buddies have taken some monster bucks.We always show them to the land owner.There response is always the same,I've seen a bigger one.You have permission show them and thank them.They all know they could Leese the land.

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from Gritz wrote 3 years 37 weeks ago

I hunt my father's farm every opening weekend and most of the season. I have never shot a decent buck. Mostly an abundance of does. He lets his nephew hunt this land during bow season and every year he takes out a nice size buck. This urks me to no end only because this nephew also owns his own 100 acres of prime woodland but doesn't bow hunt it because he "Grows" his deer for trophies and would never let anyone else hunt it either. I try not to let it get to me and just enjoy the freedom of having the family farm to hunt on. I guess the real point is, if I did not know about this or see the pictures I would not think anything of it and would be much happier. If someone asked if I wanted to know I could not stop myself from saying I would. So this is a case of too much information. I think it sums up what people are saying. Yeah, go ahead and be honest, but don't go into detail unless pushed. Even if we try to take to high ground it breaks our hearts a little bit because deep down there is something competitive about hunting that gets to every hunter no matter how altruistic they try to be.

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