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Bourjaily: Abandoned O/Us

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October 20, 2010

Bourjaily: Abandoned O/Us

By Phil Bourjaily

I walked into my local sporting goods store yesterday to find one of the employees stocking the ammo shelves with slugs. Deer season doesn’t open until early December.

“It’s crazy,” he said. “Pheasant season opens in 10 days. We should be getting ready for that right now, not deer season, but nobody’s pheasant hunting this year.”

Besides the very sad epidemic of abandoned bird dogs in Iowa (The Gun Nuts reported on this back in April, long before the Chicago Tribune got hold of the story) another consequence of the decline of our pheasants is a glutted market of O/Us and side by sides, both new and used. With our bird populations bottoming out, the same store—which used to hold an Opening Day pancake breakfast for pheasant hunters—has been unable to sell the Browning Cynergies and Citoris they ordered two years ago.

As hunting season arrives the store’s used gun rack has filled up with a bunch of neat O/Us and doubles that people have traded or brought in to sell on consignment, including a Winchester 101 like the one I’m holding in this picture (that one happens to be one of the house guns at Winchester’s Nilo Farms but they have one just like it).

While our low pheasant numbers are accelerating the trend away from O/Us, I wonder if the space age do-all $1500-plus semiauto hasn’t replaced the break action in the minds of a lot of hunters as the gun they aspire to own. Whatever the case, there are lots of used bird guns to choose from out here, but not many birds to shoot them at.

Comments (41)

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from aferraro wrote 3 years 25 weeks ago

The Remington 700 is one of the best bolt action rifles ever made. The staff at CNBC wouldn't know that because a guarantee none of you has ever shot one. Did the Trial lawyers who advertise on your network between Keith Olbermann promotions get to pick this story? For your next project scare mothers out of vaccinating their kids. This sort of yellow journalism from a business channel is truly pathetic. My open letter to CNBC- that they will never read on air-

-2 Good Comment? | | Report
from duckcreekdick wrote 3 years 25 weeks ago

Sorry about the abandoned bird dogs but not about the overrated Cynergy shotguns. Now that 101 is another matter. Any Parkers or Foxes in the rack needing a new home?

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Bella wrote 3 years 25 weeks ago

I haven't seen any glut of double guns in our gun shops, I'd love to find a nice side by side or over'n'under for small money. Of course I dream of a Drilling someday, but that's 3 barrels, not only 2.
I actually had an American Derringer Cop Special in .357mag (which is a 4 barrel!) but It had a hideous double action trigger pull and I couldn't hit the broad side of a barn with it, so I traded it back (too much gun for too tiny a grip). A very cool looking piece, but now I have a 1911, which is classicly cool and I can hit an 8 inch steel plate at 25 yards, which is acceptable for somebody as myopic as me. Still I do like multibarrel firearms, even if they don't all work. I had access to a number of muzzleloader barrels and I was speculating on building me a ribaudiquin (a 16th century multibarrelled sort of "machine gun") but other projects sidetracked that notion and the barrels got lost somewhere in a friend's barn, but if I ever do, I'll have to have "Unca Dave" test and review it!

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Mjenkins1 wrote 3 years 25 weeks ago

I would love to have a nice side by side 10x more than I would like to have one of the "new space age" semi autos. So yes, there are people out there that desire these old double guns.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from Hil wrote 3 years 25 weeks ago

I own a do-all semi. Now the gun I aspire to own is a Cynergy, which points like a dream to me...although I might be persuaded toward another O/U and am open to suggestion.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from buckhunter wrote 3 years 25 weeks ago

I am in the market for a good O/U. Has the recent glut dropped prices?

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from HogBlog wrote 3 years 25 weeks ago

For the price of most modern doubles, a hunter can buy two semi-autos or several pump guns. Folks are still economizing right now, so it's no surprise to me that the doubles are sitting on the shelves.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Del in KS wrote 3 years 25 weeks ago

Phil, What happened to Dave? Bet he is on a hunting trip. No doubt bagging some exotic beast in New Zealand. Well guess I'll be on the road myself in a few hours. BTW they are saying parts of Western Kansas have more birds than in the last 20 years. You might want to come down here to bird hunt. I can remember when Iowa was loaded with birds.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from Tom-Tom wrote 3 years 25 weeks ago

Phil, I echo the inquiry from Del in KS...where in the world is DP? His last post shook a rotten apple from the trees, and now nothing. The local used gunrack lacks semiautos as they were/are the choice for home defense according to one source. I might buy a gently used classic side by side or OU if the price were right but the fact is, after dove season, the best use for one would be sporting clays, skeet or trap doubles. Between the fescue and the bobcats, we seldom see quail in our part of Missouri.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Jere Smith wrote 3 years 25 weeks ago

You can always do Skeet & Trap with a double. I don't own an Auto anymore, after all the third shot is usually wasted on birds.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Amflyer wrote 3 years 25 weeks ago

As many of you know, Dave Petzal's alter-ego and split personality posts here under the moniker of "Yohan."

He has been undergoing treatment by the more medically minded staff at Field & Stream International, Ltd., using a impotent cocktail of over the counter cold medicines, holistic Eastern chanting, and Transcendental Meditation, all of which are combined with the aid of the Solunar Tables from 1988, which is the year this "Yohan" alter-ego was created.

Although hopeful of the outcome, if this treatment does not prove fruitful, those who care may be forced to institutionalize David and try something only discussed in dark corners and hushed voices...the dreaded Pelosi/McDonnell velvet half-nelson treatment.

May God have pity on his soul.

+5 Good Comment? | | Report
from Mike Plotner wrote 3 years 25 weeks ago

i still want a double gun. and no matter how far im gonna have to walk im going to phesant hunt. any wway it will get me in shape for track seson. thinking bout running the 200 and throwing diskus

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Tom-Tom wrote 3 years 25 weeks ago

Amflyer -- I have no idea where you are getting that
"Ol' Stump Blower" (apologies to Corey Ford and The Lower Forty), but I'd like to order some.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Amflyer wrote 3 years 25 weeks ago

Tom-Tom: Ol' Stump Blower indeed...who has ever heard of Rosie McDonnell?

No, I get high on life, or love for my wife (if she's reading) or more likely a hefty charge of IMR-4350 over a 225 grain Accubond.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from FishingnotCatching wrote 3 years 25 weeks ago

I would be more than willing to take a nice 20 ga. O/u off their hands... haha. You can't beat a nice double, I take the Citori for the ducks.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from SD Bob wrote 3 years 25 weeks ago

There's still a billion pheasants out here in South Dakota and I think Phil is correct about a shift towards the semi auto. Last weekend (pheasant opener)is one of our best weekends for selling shotty guns and most, a tad shy of everyone, who were looking for a new gun, inquired about a a semi auto. I prefer a double when I'm in the uplands but today I started out duck hunting so the Benelli was the gun of choice. Sloughs are not a good place for for my Fausti side by side.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Jim in Mo wrote 3 years 25 weeks ago

Give me a clue where I can find a good SxS for reasonable dollars. For some reason that's the only shotgun I can shoot.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from The White Slug wrote 3 years 25 weeks ago

I started late in life and am enamored of pump, lever, bolt and break action firearms. Have nothing against those who love all the newer stuff. But classic design is just that. Look at Gibson Les Pauls and Fender Stratocasters/Telecasters to name a few. I still can't understand why certain classic vehicles aren't still made using the original designs. Never leave fish to find fish.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Mike Brewer wrote 3 years 25 weeks ago

I lost a friend about twenty years ago. The individual that was resposible for this was loading his rifle outside of the cabin on opening morning of the michigan deer season and when he racked one in the chamber the gun went off. Well,he was not pointed in a safe location and the bullet went through the wall of the cabin and into my freinds head. It killed him almost instantly. The gentleman that did this was using a remington 700 rifle. I never thought that this was the guns fault until now.I have several remington guns and love them,but I will be lkeaving my rifle at home.The evidence is overwhelming against remington on this issue.I feel that their other rifles and guns are very safe. I won't own a 7oo though.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from bustedclays wrote 3 years 25 weeks ago

I own 2 shotguns: a semi-auto and an over/under and ever since I got the o/u, the semi has done nothing but gather dust in the back of the safe. (Not really, I am a nut about keeping my firearms super clean) The only time I would ever choose the semi over the o/u is if I was hunting with slugs and if I ever do, I'll probably go out and get a nice pump instead anyways. Semi-autos are overrated in my book and more of a hassle to clean afterwards.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from WA Mtnhunter wrote 3 years 25 weeks ago

I recently acquired an O/U by Stefano Fausti. Shoots real nice. All of $400 paid.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Logan C. Adams wrote 3 years 25 weeks ago

Well then, Phil, it's time to take action. I'm opening Logan's Shotgun Rescue. It's like a dog rescue, only I take in lost, unwanted shotguns and give them good homes. Please, tell those poor firearms dealers to send their unwanted over/unders to me in North Dakota. I'll make sure they get the love, care and time afield they deserve.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Tigerbeetle wrote 3 years 25 weeks ago

I guess because we don't have any pheasants in Georgia (to speak of anyway) all those S/Ss and O/Us still have warm, cozy, caring homes. I love my Citori. I also love my Ithaca 100 SKB 20 ga. S/S. And I love my Remington 1100, 12 ga, my Winchester Mdl 12, 12 ga Duck Gun, my Browning Mdl 12, 20 ga., my Ithica Mdl 37 20 ga, and my Rotweil 720 trap gun, and my .... Well, you get the drift. Every one of them are worthy, not just the O/Us and S/Ss. I do have lust in my heart for the new Ithaca 28 ga. Ooohhh, that is pretty. Tb

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from ingebrigtsen wrote 3 years 25 weeks ago

ive owned an baikal mod. 27 o/u since i was 16 and im going on 35 now.. heavy solid steel with rough dimentioning and 12 2 3/4 inch full and half throathing.. it has worked wondefully the whole time and even if the action was a bit stiff in the beginning, useage has made it silky smooth and i reload "almost" as quick as a semi or pump, but can put two rounds on anything faster and with better control than either im sure.. in addition its really solidly built, and ive read stories bout people in russia using that same model for slugs ,and the throathing be damned. when the barrel frays just get the hacksaw out and cut off the offending bit. hardchromed and ready for steel useage 15 years later.. and for anyone that wonders. cheaper than everything except maybbe a mossberg maverick pump. and wont break down for almost anything.. safetysystem is flawless too. never even wondered about the safety being "safe" to carry with shell chambered, and since it has the "mossberg pump" safety lever, thumb actuated, checking the safety is second nature now..
Can be reccomended for 3 inch shells now and if minimum care to the blued metal is taken will last a literal lifetime.. by now i want a benelli nova 3,5 inch 12ga. or remington ultramag 3,5 inch instead, but that cos mounting a reddot is easier and have more options for mounting.. and the combined version has easily available scope or reddot mounting even if its proprietary.. just fyc ;) peace out

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from FirstBubba wrote 3 years 25 weeks ago

Love a SxS. Might as well be looking down a 2x4 for all the good it does me!
Love a M12 Win. Might as well be looking down the "edge" of a 2x4 for all the good THAT does me!
If it spreads shot, I'm all for it!
Prefer "Classic" types, though!
Twenty-one Winchesters! M12 Winchesters! L.C. Smith(I have one in 16ga!) Greeners! Holland & Holland! Purdey!
Got to hold and drool on the hand rubbed, matte finished, straight English stock of a 20ga Churchill. The serial number had less digits than the price, minus the zeros! The price tag was worth at least $50 merely by the weight of the ink that said "Churchill".

Those fine, hand finished and assembled firearms are the epitome of "skilled craftsman"! Whether you like them or not, to NOT appreciate one for what it is, is tantamount to dismissing a scantily clad Ms. Cuthbert for having one hair out of place!

Bubba

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Longbeard wrote 3 years 25 weeks ago

Upland bird hunting is often more about socializing and having fun with your friends, watching the dogs work, and just enjoying not having a roof over your head. Carrying a S/S or an O/U adds to that experience. I love toting my 686 on those all day quail hunts because it is so light and easy to bring up to rising birds. But pheasant loads tend to rock my shoulder a little more than I would like. So I'll switch to a semi-auto on Days 2+. By then, I've re-learned to make the first 2 shots count.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Bella wrote 3 years 25 weeks ago

I saw a Baikal over and under combo gun in the shop, kinda like my Savage 24 but built like a tank, with internal hammers. Finish on the stock looked typically Russian (like the wood on an SKS but a little darker, with rather broad deep checkering). Action was awful stiff, but it was a brand new gun. It weighed a lot more than my Savage 24 though and felt clunkier in the hand. I didn't like the "koch on closing" feature (excuse spelling, don't want to run afoul of obscenity filter by mentioning roosters), I prefer the external hammer on the old Savage.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from ingebrigtsen wrote 3 years 25 weeks ago

bella. if ya want something solid, something tested then try baikal,, after bout 200 sh9ots it will smooth out like babyskin abnd give ya excellent perfromance throughouth a lie time.. those open hammer models dont have a dual mechanical safetysystem... the baikal does and is so solidly built that anyone with basic guncsre will be able to keep it runing for decades ;)

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Bella wrote 3 years 25 weeks ago

I just prefer an external hammer that I can thumb back quietly when I'm ready to shoot. As far as the Baikal goes I don't doubt that they are functional and very durable. By the way I've cut the choked portion off a shotgun barrel so I could shoot slugs myself! A cylinder bore is much more useful to me for a general purpose shotgun anyway, but then I'm a bit of a Luddite.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from focusfront wrote 3 years 25 weeks ago

Bella;

I kind of like exposed hammers, too. Except for a couple of somewhat overpriced cowboy action coach guns, you can't get them. Pity.

Phil, you asked a question and answered it. No birds to shoot, who needs a $2000+ O/U? Where I live, today's harvesters and cultivators do too good a job, and plant right up to the fenceline. Result, no cover. The last rooster pheasant I saw in the wild was two years ago, and that was the only one I had seen in ten years. Turkeys and geese we have a gazillion of.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from ngonseth wrote 3 years 25 weeks ago

SD Bob is right. Pheasants are so thick up here that we are just about tripping on them.

Regarding the O/U vs Auto, I have both. I love the O/U, it's a joy to shoot and carry. But anymore, I find myself carrying the SBEII nearly all the time. It cycles cleanly, recoils lightly, and withstands a beating. I hunt heavy during the pheasant season here, and the only maintenance required for my auto is an occasional drop of oil and a good tear-down and clean at the end of the season.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from ingebrigtsen wrote 3 years 25 weeks ago

Well bella ive used that mod 27 continuously for 19+ years now and havent ever had one incident even if ive hunted in any temperature from 45- celsius to 30+... the safety system in the baikal is american proof. u have tu put it in unsafe to fire and no other gun have kept the safety so good as the baikal.. get the side by side version.. it will cost u bout the same as a cheap used gun but will outperform it by a landslide every f-ing day bella ;) and the stock as far as i understand it will fit so close to your physique that u will be amazed of it im sure.. when i was in the coastguard i shot a s/s to win the boats championship clay target competition, and im 6.3 and kinda built like a normal guy and still i could hit the damn clays with it..
Besides the baikal mod 27 over under combined rifle/shottie is superb in performance even if there is lighter and much more expensive guns out there ;) Just try one is what im saying.. solidly built, safetysystem is something u would trust yer life with every day and as i prolly mentioned CHEAPLY ;) less than 500 bucks for an ower under rifle/shottie that can take a couple of decades of beating up and use withouth nothing more than silky finish action happening.. there is a reason why i "sold" it to my nephew.. i know its a good safe gun and if u could put a price on safety, the russians do it much better ;)
Can also reccomend a zastava rifle if u dare try one ;) mauser mechanism and solid steel construction..
U americans can be a bit deluded to actual build quality.. prolly cos of the media report of american automobile industry ;):P:D

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Bella wrote 3 years 25 weeks ago

They don't make my Savage 24 anymore anyway, so if a body wants a new double combo gun. the Baikal is probably the way to go. When somebody has one handy and will let me put a few rounds through it, I'd be more than happy to test fire a Baikal.
I went out looking for gray Squirrels today with my Savage. Didn't see none so I just did some plinking on the range (theraputic gunfire, you know).

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from ingebrigtsen wrote 3 years 25 weeks ago

yep i know ;)

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from ingebrigtsen wrote 3 years 25 weeks ago
from Bella wrote 3 years 25 weeks ago

Ohh The Baikal combo gun in the picture has some nice figure to the wood...and the rifle barrel is on the underside, I suppose It doesn't make a difference if the shot barrel is on top or beneath...

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from ingebrigtsen wrote 3 years 25 weeks ago

And the baikal has the rifle barrel in a sleeve allowing it to lenghten withouth binding with the shottie barrel when u shoot it hot. giving it way more precision and less drift from shot to shot;)
Try finding that anywhere else in anything close to the same pricerange ;)

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from ingebrigtsen wrote 3 years 25 weeks ago

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=--GbVKwDfNU

another baikal product ;)

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from pandora wrote 3 years 24 weeks ago

Pretty good post. I just stumbled upon your blog and wanted to say that I have really enjoyed reading your blog posts.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from 7mickeyMantle wrote 3 years 22 weeks ago

Does anyone have an opinion of the Savage Milano. I saw one at a gun store for 899. I don't know much about o/u guns but was interested.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from New Age Bubba wrote 3 years 8 weeks ago

Went on a quail hunt for the first time since the 60's and used my dove gun, a Rem 1100. The 'ranch' owner/guide/dog handler was a little disapointed in my gun choice due to safety considerations (he said), but I caught him in a weak moment and he let me hunt 1 on 1 with him for basically all the cash I had on me. Actually, it might be a good price bargain ploy to brandish your US made gas or pump gun when discussing price, and only after bring out your expensive double.

Had more fun that afternoon than in recent years deer and hog hunting, and it became apparent after watching my host shoot his O/U (yes he shot too as there were only two of us) that there are advantages in shooting a double for upland hunting: safety in very close proximity to another hunter for several hours, climbing thru fences, etc; ability to retain empty shells to avoid littering the pasture; two chokes; and possibly a quicker pointing gun design (shorter overall length).

And yes, the birds were pen raised, but I assure you that it was a very demanding hunt both physically and in terms of gun handling, and if you haven't spent time on the skeet or trap range recently you will be humiliated. There's a reason that these guides offer free clay bird sessions prior to the hunt--they are sizing you up and evaluating your lies!

Let's have some more comments and articles on this topic please!

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Post a Comment

from Amflyer wrote 3 years 25 weeks ago

As many of you know, Dave Petzal's alter-ego and split personality posts here under the moniker of "Yohan."

He has been undergoing treatment by the more medically minded staff at Field & Stream International, Ltd., using a impotent cocktail of over the counter cold medicines, holistic Eastern chanting, and Transcendental Meditation, all of which are combined with the aid of the Solunar Tables from 1988, which is the year this "Yohan" alter-ego was created.

Although hopeful of the outcome, if this treatment does not prove fruitful, those who care may be forced to institutionalize David and try something only discussed in dark corners and hushed voices...the dreaded Pelosi/McDonnell velvet half-nelson treatment.

May God have pity on his soul.

+5 Good Comment? | | Report
from Mjenkins1 wrote 3 years 25 weeks ago

I would love to have a nice side by side 10x more than I would like to have one of the "new space age" semi autos. So yes, there are people out there that desire these old double guns.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from Del in KS wrote 3 years 25 weeks ago

Phil, What happened to Dave? Bet he is on a hunting trip. No doubt bagging some exotic beast in New Zealand. Well guess I'll be on the road myself in a few hours. BTW they are saying parts of Western Kansas have more birds than in the last 20 years. You might want to come down here to bird hunt. I can remember when Iowa was loaded with birds.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from Hil wrote 3 years 25 weeks ago

I own a do-all semi. Now the gun I aspire to own is a Cynergy, which points like a dream to me...although I might be persuaded toward another O/U and am open to suggestion.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from buckhunter wrote 3 years 25 weeks ago

I am in the market for a good O/U. Has the recent glut dropped prices?

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from HogBlog wrote 3 years 25 weeks ago

For the price of most modern doubles, a hunter can buy two semi-autos or several pump guns. Folks are still economizing right now, so it's no surprise to me that the doubles are sitting on the shelves.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Logan C. Adams wrote 3 years 25 weeks ago

Well then, Phil, it's time to take action. I'm opening Logan's Shotgun Rescue. It's like a dog rescue, only I take in lost, unwanted shotguns and give them good homes. Please, tell those poor firearms dealers to send their unwanted over/unders to me in North Dakota. I'll make sure they get the love, care and time afield they deserve.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from duckcreekdick wrote 3 years 25 weeks ago

Sorry about the abandoned bird dogs but not about the overrated Cynergy shotguns. Now that 101 is another matter. Any Parkers or Foxes in the rack needing a new home?

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Bella wrote 3 years 25 weeks ago

I haven't seen any glut of double guns in our gun shops, I'd love to find a nice side by side or over'n'under for small money. Of course I dream of a Drilling someday, but that's 3 barrels, not only 2.
I actually had an American Derringer Cop Special in .357mag (which is a 4 barrel!) but It had a hideous double action trigger pull and I couldn't hit the broad side of a barn with it, so I traded it back (too much gun for too tiny a grip). A very cool looking piece, but now I have a 1911, which is classicly cool and I can hit an 8 inch steel plate at 25 yards, which is acceptable for somebody as myopic as me. Still I do like multibarrel firearms, even if they don't all work. I had access to a number of muzzleloader barrels and I was speculating on building me a ribaudiquin (a 16th century multibarrelled sort of "machine gun") but other projects sidetracked that notion and the barrels got lost somewhere in a friend's barn, but if I ever do, I'll have to have "Unca Dave" test and review it!

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Tom-Tom wrote 3 years 25 weeks ago

Phil, I echo the inquiry from Del in KS...where in the world is DP? His last post shook a rotten apple from the trees, and now nothing. The local used gunrack lacks semiautos as they were/are the choice for home defense according to one source. I might buy a gently used classic side by side or OU if the price were right but the fact is, after dove season, the best use for one would be sporting clays, skeet or trap doubles. Between the fescue and the bobcats, we seldom see quail in our part of Missouri.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from ingebrigtsen wrote 3 years 25 weeks ago

ive owned an baikal mod. 27 o/u since i was 16 and im going on 35 now.. heavy solid steel with rough dimentioning and 12 2 3/4 inch full and half throathing.. it has worked wondefully the whole time and even if the action was a bit stiff in the beginning, useage has made it silky smooth and i reload "almost" as quick as a semi or pump, but can put two rounds on anything faster and with better control than either im sure.. in addition its really solidly built, and ive read stories bout people in russia using that same model for slugs ,and the throathing be damned. when the barrel frays just get the hacksaw out and cut off the offending bit. hardchromed and ready for steel useage 15 years later.. and for anyone that wonders. cheaper than everything except maybbe a mossberg maverick pump. and wont break down for almost anything.. safetysystem is flawless too. never even wondered about the safety being "safe" to carry with shell chambered, and since it has the "mossberg pump" safety lever, thumb actuated, checking the safety is second nature now..
Can be reccomended for 3 inch shells now and if minimum care to the blued metal is taken will last a literal lifetime.. by now i want a benelli nova 3,5 inch 12ga. or remington ultramag 3,5 inch instead, but that cos mounting a reddot is easier and have more options for mounting.. and the combined version has easily available scope or reddot mounting even if its proprietary.. just fyc ;) peace out

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Bella wrote 3 years 25 weeks ago

I saw a Baikal over and under combo gun in the shop, kinda like my Savage 24 but built like a tank, with internal hammers. Finish on the stock looked typically Russian (like the wood on an SKS but a little darker, with rather broad deep checkering). Action was awful stiff, but it was a brand new gun. It weighed a lot more than my Savage 24 though and felt clunkier in the hand. I didn't like the "koch on closing" feature (excuse spelling, don't want to run afoul of obscenity filter by mentioning roosters), I prefer the external hammer on the old Savage.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from ingebrigtsen wrote 3 years 25 weeks ago

bella. if ya want something solid, something tested then try baikal,, after bout 200 sh9ots it will smooth out like babyskin abnd give ya excellent perfromance throughouth a lie time.. those open hammer models dont have a dual mechanical safetysystem... the baikal does and is so solidly built that anyone with basic guncsre will be able to keep it runing for decades ;)

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Bella wrote 3 years 25 weeks ago

I just prefer an external hammer that I can thumb back quietly when I'm ready to shoot. As far as the Baikal goes I don't doubt that they are functional and very durable. By the way I've cut the choked portion off a shotgun barrel so I could shoot slugs myself! A cylinder bore is much more useful to me for a general purpose shotgun anyway, but then I'm a bit of a Luddite.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from ingebrigtsen wrote 3 years 25 weeks ago

Well bella ive used that mod 27 continuously for 19+ years now and havent ever had one incident even if ive hunted in any temperature from 45- celsius to 30+... the safety system in the baikal is american proof. u have tu put it in unsafe to fire and no other gun have kept the safety so good as the baikal.. get the side by side version.. it will cost u bout the same as a cheap used gun but will outperform it by a landslide every f-ing day bella ;) and the stock as far as i understand it will fit so close to your physique that u will be amazed of it im sure.. when i was in the coastguard i shot a s/s to win the boats championship clay target competition, and im 6.3 and kinda built like a normal guy and still i could hit the damn clays with it..
Besides the baikal mod 27 over under combined rifle/shottie is superb in performance even if there is lighter and much more expensive guns out there ;) Just try one is what im saying.. solidly built, safetysystem is something u would trust yer life with every day and as i prolly mentioned CHEAPLY ;) less than 500 bucks for an ower under rifle/shottie that can take a couple of decades of beating up and use withouth nothing more than silky finish action happening.. there is a reason why i "sold" it to my nephew.. i know its a good safe gun and if u could put a price on safety, the russians do it much better ;)
Can also reccomend a zastava rifle if u dare try one ;) mauser mechanism and solid steel construction..
U americans can be a bit deluded to actual build quality.. prolly cos of the media report of american automobile industry ;):P:D

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Bella wrote 3 years 25 weeks ago

They don't make my Savage 24 anymore anyway, so if a body wants a new double combo gun. the Baikal is probably the way to go. When somebody has one handy and will let me put a few rounds through it, I'd be more than happy to test fire a Baikal.
I went out looking for gray Squirrels today with my Savage. Didn't see none so I just did some plinking on the range (theraputic gunfire, you know).

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from ingebrigtsen wrote 3 years 25 weeks ago

yep i know ;)

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from ingebrigtsen wrote 3 years 25 weeks ago
from Bella wrote 3 years 25 weeks ago

Ohh The Baikal combo gun in the picture has some nice figure to the wood...and the rifle barrel is on the underside, I suppose It doesn't make a difference if the shot barrel is on top or beneath...

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from ingebrigtsen wrote 3 years 25 weeks ago

And the baikal has the rifle barrel in a sleeve allowing it to lenghten withouth binding with the shottie barrel when u shoot it hot. giving it way more precision and less drift from shot to shot;)
Try finding that anywhere else in anything close to the same pricerange ;)

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from ingebrigtsen wrote 3 years 25 weeks ago

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=--GbVKwDfNU

another baikal product ;)

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from Jere Smith wrote 3 years 25 weeks ago

You can always do Skeet & Trap with a double. I don't own an Auto anymore, after all the third shot is usually wasted on birds.

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from Mike Plotner wrote 3 years 25 weeks ago

i still want a double gun. and no matter how far im gonna have to walk im going to phesant hunt. any wway it will get me in shape for track seson. thinking bout running the 200 and throwing diskus

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from Tom-Tom wrote 3 years 25 weeks ago

Amflyer -- I have no idea where you are getting that
"Ol' Stump Blower" (apologies to Corey Ford and The Lower Forty), but I'd like to order some.

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from Amflyer wrote 3 years 25 weeks ago

Tom-Tom: Ol' Stump Blower indeed...who has ever heard of Rosie McDonnell?

No, I get high on life, or love for my wife (if she's reading) or more likely a hefty charge of IMR-4350 over a 225 grain Accubond.

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from FishingnotCatching wrote 3 years 25 weeks ago

I would be more than willing to take a nice 20 ga. O/u off their hands... haha. You can't beat a nice double, I take the Citori for the ducks.

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from SD Bob wrote 3 years 25 weeks ago

There's still a billion pheasants out here in South Dakota and I think Phil is correct about a shift towards the semi auto. Last weekend (pheasant opener)is one of our best weekends for selling shotty guns and most, a tad shy of everyone, who were looking for a new gun, inquired about a a semi auto. I prefer a double when I'm in the uplands but today I started out duck hunting so the Benelli was the gun of choice. Sloughs are not a good place for for my Fausti side by side.

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from Jim in Mo wrote 3 years 25 weeks ago

Give me a clue where I can find a good SxS for reasonable dollars. For some reason that's the only shotgun I can shoot.

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from The White Slug wrote 3 years 25 weeks ago

I started late in life and am enamored of pump, lever, bolt and break action firearms. Have nothing against those who love all the newer stuff. But classic design is just that. Look at Gibson Les Pauls and Fender Stratocasters/Telecasters to name a few. I still can't understand why certain classic vehicles aren't still made using the original designs. Never leave fish to find fish.

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from Mike Brewer wrote 3 years 25 weeks ago

I lost a friend about twenty years ago. The individual that was resposible for this was loading his rifle outside of the cabin on opening morning of the michigan deer season and when he racked one in the chamber the gun went off. Well,he was not pointed in a safe location and the bullet went through the wall of the cabin and into my freinds head. It killed him almost instantly. The gentleman that did this was using a remington 700 rifle. I never thought that this was the guns fault until now.I have several remington guns and love them,but I will be lkeaving my rifle at home.The evidence is overwhelming against remington on this issue.I feel that their other rifles and guns are very safe. I won't own a 7oo though.

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from bustedclays wrote 3 years 25 weeks ago

I own 2 shotguns: a semi-auto and an over/under and ever since I got the o/u, the semi has done nothing but gather dust in the back of the safe. (Not really, I am a nut about keeping my firearms super clean) The only time I would ever choose the semi over the o/u is if I was hunting with slugs and if I ever do, I'll probably go out and get a nice pump instead anyways. Semi-autos are overrated in my book and more of a hassle to clean afterwards.

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from WA Mtnhunter wrote 3 years 25 weeks ago

I recently acquired an O/U by Stefano Fausti. Shoots real nice. All of $400 paid.

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from Tigerbeetle wrote 3 years 25 weeks ago

I guess because we don't have any pheasants in Georgia (to speak of anyway) all those S/Ss and O/Us still have warm, cozy, caring homes. I love my Citori. I also love my Ithaca 100 SKB 20 ga. S/S. And I love my Remington 1100, 12 ga, my Winchester Mdl 12, 12 ga Duck Gun, my Browning Mdl 12, 20 ga., my Ithica Mdl 37 20 ga, and my Rotweil 720 trap gun, and my .... Well, you get the drift. Every one of them are worthy, not just the O/Us and S/Ss. I do have lust in my heart for the new Ithaca 28 ga. Ooohhh, that is pretty. Tb

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from FirstBubba wrote 3 years 25 weeks ago

Love a SxS. Might as well be looking down a 2x4 for all the good it does me!
Love a M12 Win. Might as well be looking down the "edge" of a 2x4 for all the good THAT does me!
If it spreads shot, I'm all for it!
Prefer "Classic" types, though!
Twenty-one Winchesters! M12 Winchesters! L.C. Smith(I have one in 16ga!) Greeners! Holland & Holland! Purdey!
Got to hold and drool on the hand rubbed, matte finished, straight English stock of a 20ga Churchill. The serial number had less digits than the price, minus the zeros! The price tag was worth at least $50 merely by the weight of the ink that said "Churchill".

Those fine, hand finished and assembled firearms are the epitome of "skilled craftsman"! Whether you like them or not, to NOT appreciate one for what it is, is tantamount to dismissing a scantily clad Ms. Cuthbert for having one hair out of place!

Bubba

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from Longbeard wrote 3 years 25 weeks ago

Upland bird hunting is often more about socializing and having fun with your friends, watching the dogs work, and just enjoying not having a roof over your head. Carrying a S/S or an O/U adds to that experience. I love toting my 686 on those all day quail hunts because it is so light and easy to bring up to rising birds. But pheasant loads tend to rock my shoulder a little more than I would like. So I'll switch to a semi-auto on Days 2+. By then, I've re-learned to make the first 2 shots count.

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from focusfront wrote 3 years 25 weeks ago

Bella;

I kind of like exposed hammers, too. Except for a couple of somewhat overpriced cowboy action coach guns, you can't get them. Pity.

Phil, you asked a question and answered it. No birds to shoot, who needs a $2000+ O/U? Where I live, today's harvesters and cultivators do too good a job, and plant right up to the fenceline. Result, no cover. The last rooster pheasant I saw in the wild was two years ago, and that was the only one I had seen in ten years. Turkeys and geese we have a gazillion of.

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from ngonseth wrote 3 years 25 weeks ago

SD Bob is right. Pheasants are so thick up here that we are just about tripping on them.

Regarding the O/U vs Auto, I have both. I love the O/U, it's a joy to shoot and carry. But anymore, I find myself carrying the SBEII nearly all the time. It cycles cleanly, recoils lightly, and withstands a beating. I hunt heavy during the pheasant season here, and the only maintenance required for my auto is an occasional drop of oil and a good tear-down and clean at the end of the season.

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from pandora wrote 3 years 24 weeks ago

Pretty good post. I just stumbled upon your blog and wanted to say that I have really enjoyed reading your blog posts.

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from 7mickeyMantle wrote 3 years 22 weeks ago

Does anyone have an opinion of the Savage Milano. I saw one at a gun store for 899. I don't know much about o/u guns but was interested.

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from New Age Bubba wrote 3 years 8 weeks ago

Went on a quail hunt for the first time since the 60's and used my dove gun, a Rem 1100. The 'ranch' owner/guide/dog handler was a little disapointed in my gun choice due to safety considerations (he said), but I caught him in a weak moment and he let me hunt 1 on 1 with him for basically all the cash I had on me. Actually, it might be a good price bargain ploy to brandish your US made gas or pump gun when discussing price, and only after bring out your expensive double.

Had more fun that afternoon than in recent years deer and hog hunting, and it became apparent after watching my host shoot his O/U (yes he shot too as there were only two of us) that there are advantages in shooting a double for upland hunting: safety in very close proximity to another hunter for several hours, climbing thru fences, etc; ability to retain empty shells to avoid littering the pasture; two chokes; and possibly a quicker pointing gun design (shorter overall length).

And yes, the birds were pen raised, but I assure you that it was a very demanding hunt both physically and in terms of gun handling, and if you haven't spent time on the skeet or trap range recently you will be humiliated. There's a reason that these guides offer free clay bird sessions prior to the hunt--they are sizing you up and evaluating your lies!

Let's have some more comments and articles on this topic please!

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from aferraro wrote 3 years 25 weeks ago

The Remington 700 is one of the best bolt action rifles ever made. The staff at CNBC wouldn't know that because a guarantee none of you has ever shot one. Did the Trial lawyers who advertise on your network between Keith Olbermann promotions get to pick this story? For your next project scare mothers out of vaccinating their kids. This sort of yellow journalism from a business channel is truly pathetic. My open letter to CNBC- that they will never read on air-

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