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Contest: What’s The Secret Ingredient in Your Wild Game Chili Recipe?

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February 09, 2011

Contest: What’s The Secret Ingredient in Your Wild Game Chili Recipe?

By David Draper

by David Draper

Perhaps more so than any other dish, chili is open to endless adaptations. Every hunter has his own secret ingredient for wild game chili, as well as idea of how chili should, or shouldn’t, taste. The beans-versus-no-beans argument is well known to anyone who has talked to a Texan about chili. But what about Cincinnati chili, which forgoes any type of chili powder or peppers and is served over spaghetti? As unusual as that sounds, it’s hugely popular in its namesake city, and I’m sure darn good. Admittedly, I haven’t had the opportunity to try it, but certainly wouldn’t turn down a bowl.

Many folks have a set chili recipe they’ve perfected over the years, while others just wing it, experimenting with each batch. Some recipes are pretty standard fare, while others call for unusual ingredients. For example, in college I threw a fist full of white sugar into a batch of deer chili and have been doing it ever since. My good friend’s mother has a rather bizarre secret chili ingredient: chocolate chips. They give the chili a flavor that reminds me of Mexico. Others swear by a certain brand of beer.

I want to know what your secret chili ingredient is. Share in the comments section, and explain what it adds to the dish. The two readers with the best use of an unusual or uncommon ingredient will win the above-pictured mortar and pestle set, courtesy of Cabela’s. (Contest ends Monday, February 14, at 10 a.m. EST.) Good luck!

Comments (73)

Top Rated
All Comments
from tjfslaughter wrote 3 years 10 weeks ago

Toasted then crushed Cumin

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Michael Sutherin wrote 3 years 10 weeks ago

Home grown sweet corn, not from a can. Adds a spectacular sweetness, filler and color, not to mention you get your veggies with your chili.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Koldkut wrote 3 years 10 weeks ago

Along the lines of Chocolate chips, I use the old betty crocker recipe, it calls for cocoa.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from thequam wrote 3 years 10 weeks ago

Nothing to crazy for me, just a great big Hershey bar. I make smokin' hot chilli and the chocolate helps to balance the heat initially.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from hunter6 wrote 3 years 10 weeks ago

I have two that make it awesome ... 1 st. mexican style chili powder and yes here it goes PEANUT BUTTER . Sound's weird i know but don't knock it until you try it ...

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Brock12Gauge wrote 3 years 10 weeks ago

I love to add small chunks of self harvested "smoked" duck breast! It compliments any variety of chili pepper and adds a nice smokey taste to the entire pot!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Hil wrote 3 years 10 weeks ago

You need to google up a recipe for Cincinnati or Skyline chili and make a batch at home. It IS awesome.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from prohunter11 wrote 3 years 10 weeks ago

To cans of chili magic is the only way to go fast and easy

-1 Good Comment? | | Report
from mvpjr51 wrote 3 years 10 weeks ago

For me it is a bottle of Guinness Extra Stout. Not the stuff in the black bottle with the mixing ball but the brown bottle with tan label.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from daveygolfcunningham wrote 3 years 10 weeks ago

My black and white chili rocks. Black and northern beans, fresh corn, chunky tomatoes, small chunks of potatoe, jalepeno peppers, green and white onions, and of course, venison stew meat. Dash of sugar and mustard sets it off to the moon.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Del in KS wrote 3 years 10 weeks ago

Use very lean meat and add Extra virgin olive oil for fat. Add a chopped onion and some chopped garlic. Season with 50-50 mix of Williams chili powder and ground Cumin. Please, please NO canned tomatoes. Use enough of the spices to make it red, add a little masa flour to thicken. Sea salt to taste. One other thing is throw the spices in with the raw meat, onion, garlic and olive oil and brown it all together. Use a cast iron dutch oven for cooking chili.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Del in KS wrote 3 years 10 weeks ago

One other thing. If you want heat add Tobasco sauce.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from drenkes wrote 3 years 10 weeks ago

clamota juice instead of tamato juice

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Bruce E. Matthews wrote 3 years 10 weeks ago

Fresh-squeezed lime juice and home-made venison (cut with a little pork) chorizo sausage.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from HungryHawk wrote 3 years 10 weeks ago

Venison from tough cuts like blade & shank braised low & slow for 24 hrs - it's rich & savory. Also Spanish smoked paprika for some round, warm smoky flavors.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from w_worsham wrote 3 years 10 weeks ago

Fry out 1/2 lb of "Streak-o-lean". Brown your meat in the drippings. I add finely chopped celery, onion, green onions with the tops(chopped), 1/4 cup+ chili powder, toasted, grounf cumin, salt, fresh groung black pepper, fresh sliced portabello mushrooms, Tabasco Green. Cook 2-3 hous on simmer. Serve with cornbread, grated cheese, and the Streal-o-lean crumbled up on top. Enjoy.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from TM wrote 3 years 10 weeks ago

Ground roasted cashews. Sounds weird, but the reason that indian currys are so rich and thick (while the ones you make at home are thin and flat) is ground cashews. Unlike starch thickeners like flour or cornmeal, ground nuts add richness to chili too. Try a 1/2 cup of ground cashews at the end of your next pot, with a tiny amount of vinegar. Thick and creamy. Yum.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from s-kfry wrote 3 years 10 weeks ago

To build on HungryHawk, use a roast, cut into 1/2 inch cubes, maybe fry first and then cook long with everything else. The meat stays together, even if significantly loosened up by slow cooking, and retains more of the game meat flavor which I think gets lost if you use ground.

This is why I ask the processor to leave as much of my meat in chunks (roast, steak, etc.) rather than grinding it up. You can always tear it apart later, but's its really hard to put ground back together (even with superglue).

Sean

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from JBgrouse23 wrote 3 years 10 weeks ago

A chocolate stout goes very well with a number of peppers. Make sure you try a bunch first though, because one that is has too much chocolate will throw off the taste

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from jbird wrote 3 years 10 weeks ago

I think it's fun to change it up every time. I plan on using some dark chocolate next batch since I heard many competition chili recipes use it to add richness. I prefer making it hot, but since my kid's came along, I've had to go mild, and add hot sauce to my bowl. It's just not the same as cooking the heat in.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from BWilliams wrote 3 years 10 weeks ago

Half a can of pumpkin mellows out spicy flavors really nice. Yes, canned pumpkin, the same stuff your wife uses to make pies for Thanksgiving. I also use an immersion blender to smooth out the beans and other veggies before I add deer sausage to the mix. Next time you make chili, add pumpkin and blend it just a bit. Trust me. It's good!

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from BWilliams wrote 3 years 10 weeks ago

Half a can of pumpkin mellows out spicy flavors really nice. Yes, canned pumpkin, the same stuff your wife uses to make pies for Thanksgiving. I also use an immersion blender to smooth out the beans and other veggies before I add deer sausage to the mix. Next time you make chili, add pumpkin and blend it just a bit. Trust me. It's good!

-1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Greenhead wrote 3 years 10 weeks ago

I add a bit of Kahlua. You don't actually taste it but it does give a greater depth of flavor. Like you said about the chocolate, it tastes like Mexico.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Drew McClure wrote 3 years 10 weeks ago

Cambell's nacho cheese, boom shaka lacka;/

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Proverbs wrote 3 years 10 weeks ago

Wild mustard. This plant seems to sprout everywhere during the winter and spring throughout the greater Phoenix area. After years of mowing it and pulling it out of my yard, I decided to do a little research and found this wild mustard not only edible, but is common in the southwest this time of year. It has yellow flowers and slender leaves 4-5 inches long. It is pretty spicy and strong flavored, which is why I think it does a good job in the chili. You can use it dried and crushed, but I like best when plucked fresh out of the yard and finely chopped. I toss in about 1/4 cup (chopped) into my 16-quart slow-cooker. Like anything with a unique taste, start small and figure out what you like best.

Wild mustard is really a weed, so it's best to pick it from your own yard so you can be sure it hasn't been sprayed. If you want a picture to help identify it, visit our local newspaper website and enter "wild mustard" in the search function. It will bring up a 2009 story and picture of the mustard. The site is: www.azcentral.com

Enjoy!

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Kormos wrote 3 years 10 weeks ago

My secret is fresh chopped Cilantro, almost a whole bunch without the stems, boil this down with a can of cheap domestic beer, it adds Tex-Mex flavor, (also good in a pot of red beans). It also helps to listen to Crosby. Stills, Nash and Young while cooking.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Hil wrote 3 years 10 weeks ago

No one has mentioned perhaps the most important thing to bringing out the flavor in chili: time. Make the chili on Sunday, stick it in the fridge, eat it on Tuesday. Wednesday is better if you can wait that long.

+5 Good Comment? | | Report
from Dann wrote 3 years 10 weeks ago

Dried ground rosemary, sage and 2 crushed bay leaves. Gives the chili an "earthy" flavor. mmmmm good

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Levi Banks wrote 3 years 10 weeks ago

I like pumpkin and curry powder in a wild turkey white chili.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from rynodaug wrote 3 years 10 weeks ago

Kraft macaroni cheese powder!
Seriously, try it.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from rynodaug wrote 3 years 10 weeks ago

The cheese powder works as a thickener and adds a hit of cheese flavor.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from John L wrote 3 years 10 weeks ago

Many years ago (too many to mention) I worked with a Hispanic guy about my age (we/he called him Mexican then) who made the best venison Green Chili ever.
All I remember was that he froze it in zip-lock bags, would then thaw it out briefly and re-freeze it several times.
He claimed that each time he thawed and re-froze it would get more tender and hotter.
Don't know the theory or the fact, but it was the best chili I ever ate.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from ilikehunting wrote 3 years 10 weeks ago

I like to use ground Canada goose meat. It has a pretty high amount of fat and has a great texture. I like to sprinkle pepper jack cheese over the top. It has a nice creamy texture and a nice splash of heat as well. I might have to go make a batch after typing this..

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Blue Ox wrote 3 years 10 weeks ago

I like to age the venison about a week & a half before I take it off the meathooks & run it twice through the grinder. I like to make my own tomato sauce, and the tomatoes HAVE to be fresh. Some pepper jack cheese goes in next, along with some chipotle. Now, I like my chilli hot enough to peel paint- for that I take a dried ghost pepper, crush it into a fairly fine powder, & add that to the mix. I guarantee it'll blow your boots right off!

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from sdstewart wrote 3 years 10 weeks ago

It sounds weird but a three inch piece of dried ginger. Not fresh and not powdered. Just let it simmer in the chili for a few hours.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from BearClaw wrote 3 years 10 weeks ago

My mexican girlfriend is a fine cook and has opened my eyes to many varities and flavors of peppers. To give your chili some heat, or flavor, or both- head to a Mexican grocer (if you can't find them at your grocer)and look for dried chiles de arbol (or cayenne) when you simmer you chili, which should be for a while, simply clean the peppers and put 3-4 whole peppers in the pot to simmer and absorb flavor. More peppers= more heat. Some other peppers to possibly use or experiment with (as each have distinct flavors and hotness): are the chile guajillo and chile pibil, both dried, following the same simple process.

Bottom line= it's common knowledge=peppers are a great and easy way to add flavor and heat to you chili, or any soup for that matter. A trip to a Mexican grocer will open your eyes to just how many peppers (chiles) are out there. Ask someone at the store for advice...or translation of the packet the peppers come in.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from db270 wrote 3 years 10 weeks ago

I rub my venison steak cubes with extremely fine ground coffee, brown it, and add it to the pot of chili along with a half cup of strong coffee. It adds an earthy-type kick that NO ONE can identify right off the bat. I love it because it combines two of the tastes and aromas of deer camp into one meal I can enjoy all year around.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from JustTakeMeHunting14 wrote 3 years 10 weeks ago

A few drops from a bottle of the smoke flavoring. Specifically liquid smoke brand. I know probly the last thing that should ever end up in an outdoorsmans kitchen. Artificial smoke flavoring. But it works so its fine with me.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from shane wrote 3 years 10 weeks ago

Just a little cinnamon. Only in some batches. Adds to that good comfort food feeling that chili already has.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from vork23 wrote 3 years 10 weeks ago

hersheys chocolate bar. it makes it a slightly sweat and makes the spicyness of the chilly more flavorful got the idea from using cocoa but was out of cocoa and i had a candy bar on hand and it turned out better than using the cocoa.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from RichardF wrote 3 years 10 weeks ago

Fritos Scoops... You don't have to use a spoon (better for Camping) and it also adds a good texture. I know it's not in the chili but it adds so much to the meal.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from lbuhman wrote 3 years 10 weeks ago

Add some nutmeg! Most people think of baking with it, but it really adds a great spice flavor.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from jaimecherry2 wrote 3 years 10 weeks ago

I always add a Sam Adams the last 30 min. of simmering and I saute the chopped onions and mushrooms in a Cab or Merlot.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from OwlTalonz wrote 3 years 9 weeks ago

Whole Grain Soy Sauce

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from kansasjeff wrote 3 years 9 weeks ago

one thing I always add to my chilli is some turmeric and some brown curry powder. It goes well with the chillies and the peppers and gives it an earthy tase.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from waldman79 wrote 3 years 9 weeks ago

A single drop of Dave's Insanity Sauce and one bottle of Bud Light. One, just one drop of Dave's puts the fire in the chili - more than one makes it painful.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from steve182 wrote 3 years 9 weeks ago

Lots of Cilantro and i fire-roast some Jalapeno. Multi colored beans too, red black and white.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from brktrt-18 wrote 3 years 9 weeks ago

I use a cast iron pot on the stove and after browning the meat and frying up the onions, peppers, and garlic I deglaze the pot with Aecht Schlenkerla Rauchbier (German smoked beer). The natural smoked flavor in a dark beer with minimal hops works perfectly.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from steve182 wrote 3 years 9 weeks ago

...And some tomatillo-based Green Salsa.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from country road wrote 3 years 9 weeks ago

A couple of tablespoons of tupelo honey or molasses will help smooth out any sharp edges.

I can't wait to try some chocolate and pumpkin.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from smallgamehunter25 wrote 3 years 9 weeks ago

bout a dozen mini marshmallows for a medium sized pot

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Woodstock wrote 3 years 9 weeks ago

Chipotles in adobo sauce.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from DanCS wrote 3 years 9 weeks ago

Along with my diced Venison and Venison Chorizo, I like to sneak in a good bit of Tasso. And in the last 10 min of simmering, a binch of cinnamon wakes up the flavors. There, now you know my secrets.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from bowhuntermike wrote 3 years 9 weeks ago

bacon

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from bowhuntermike wrote 3 years 9 weeks ago

bacon,velvita with a little cumin and red peper flakes ..soo good

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Lilhunter wrote 3 years 9 weeks ago

I put a lil' heiney (heineken) in it.. to help my heiney later! FELL THE BURN! :)

-1 Good Comment? | | Report
from murdock32 wrote 3 years 9 weeks ago

I can't understand the chocolate??? sounds like mixin cheddar cheese and bananas.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from crosshairy wrote 3 years 9 weeks ago

I started using ground venison chorizo sausage instead of traditional ground beef/venison a couple of years ago. Some deer processors offer this as an option, or you can make it yourself. This is especially effective when cooking for folks that are not fans of wild game, because the taste is different enough that I've never had someone recognize it.

I typically add one part chorizo to one part regular ground (beef/chicken/turkey/venison) to give the flavor and texture some dynamics. Using chorizo in combination with another kind of meet moderates the seasoning (no spice overload) and gives the chili a more complex taste and feel, which impresses people :)

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Brian W. Thair wrote 3 years 9 weeks ago

My recipe was the winner in a major chili cook off, the fools published it in the newspaper. Two key ingredients: the vinegar and the cumin. Use two pots, make 20 meals at a time. Freeze. Thanks for the cocoa idea. . . should help.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from 81Chief wrote 3 years 9 weeks ago

I add Garlic.....May as well add bad breath to the aftermath of the chili!!!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Palehorse wrote 3 years 9 weeks ago

Smoke and then grind the venison.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Craigb wrote 3 years 9 weeks ago

I use Tequila but not the good stuff. You need the cheapest you can find.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from wfbrad wrote 3 years 9 weeks ago

Paprika. I love that flavor along with dried red chili pods, cooked all day, with lots of white spanish onions and cumino. Also use pinto, small red, black, and dark kidney beans.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from kyka1865 wrote 3 years 9 weeks ago

I am a cincinnati native and the fact that many of you add chocolate is not surprising. Rumor has it that chocolate is a key ingredientin the Skyline chili recipe. I love Cincinnati chili and all other typpes of chili but most Cincinnati natives would agree that Cincinnati is chili is a whole different category of chili, not to be compared to good texas or game chili.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from 2Poppa wrote 3 years 9 weeks ago

Hil- I agree with your assessment of "time." What I do is to cook the meat the night before along with the spices. The next day I begin to slowly warm the meat adding the rest of the ingredients slowly, and then I add the beans last. This simple procedure gives my chili, the "next day flavor!"

I always use the finest, healthiest ingredients and take NO short-cuts, allowing the meat and spices to meld their individual favors with the beans and peppers in a single dish. I use "soy crumbles" which has no saturated fat or cholesterol, instead of beef burger.

Being from the Cincinnati area, we love our chili, so I usually make variations and allow the crowd to choose the tastiest. There is never any left.

1.) I make a blackened venison tenderloin chili:
One taste and you have to have more. It has of course venison tenderloin,1 lb.- 1/4-inch dice. 2-lbs.Sun-dried, Tomato Wild Turkey Sausage, skinned and diced. 3-lbs. Deer Sirloin.
One bite of this chili concoction causes the palate to connect and explode with a robust flavor causing the brain to ask, "What is in this?" The sun-dried Tomato Wild Turkey, is loaded with flavor causing the chili to pop!

2.) A Creole inspired chili:
1-lb. of venison burger. 1-lb. of chorizo sausage, with casing removed. 1-Red Anaheim Pepper, 1-Green Anaheim Pepper, both diced. 2-lb. Black Beans. 1-lb. Black-eyed peas. 16ounces- fresh green chilies. 1-cup of okra. 1-1/2 tablespoons dried japones or arbol chilies, 6 tablespoons cilantro. 2-Bottles of Newcastle Brown Ale.

This chili is served up in a bowl over rice or Creole dirty rice, with a sprinklin' of fresh green onions and a light sprinklin' of blue cheese crumbles. Cornbread is never optional! I make mine with jalapeño’s.
It is a surprise to most people who have never tried this style chili with the rice, but one taste and all you'll hear ... Mmm, Mmm!

3.) I also make an Asian chili:
After the Vietnam War I trained some of the refugees and would get invited to their house for dinner ... they really knew how to cook.

Vietnam chili has, Fresh Green Thai chilies, Beef Tenderloin - cooked in 1/4 cup peanut oil.1-1/2 tablespoon of FISH SAUCE... garlic, cilantro, and sugar. Heat it at high temperature.
To say the least, this dish is HOT, HOT, HOT, and I usually have fresh mango or mandarin oranges to cool the typical American palate.
This is a unique style chili dish that I almost always serve with a couple of other style chilies for guests who want to experience Asian Cuisine.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from contester wrote 3 years 9 weeks ago

I like to use several types of beans, and hominy. Also a tablespoon of cocoa powder.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from goldenhook wrote 3 years 9 weeks ago

chopped black olives and corn

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from bjohnston wrote 3 years 9 weeks ago

Add a cup of root beer. It gives it a familiar sweetness
that people just can't put their finger on.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Scott Alexander wrote 3 years 9 weeks ago

dark chocolate

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from dadsmom wrote 3 years 9 weeks ago

My chili recipe is pretty lame compared to what I have read so far. Just don't forget to ask me over at dinner time.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Lilhunter wrote 3 years 9 weeks ago

Maple Syrup....

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Cowboy2 wrote 3 years 9 weeks ago

Maple Syrup , Semi-Sweet Chocolate , and Dark Beer

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Jacee wrote 3 years 8 weeks ago

Instead of venison...elk!

0 Good Comment? | | Report

Post a Comment

from Hil wrote 3 years 10 weeks ago

No one has mentioned perhaps the most important thing to bringing out the flavor in chili: time. Make the chili on Sunday, stick it in the fridge, eat it on Tuesday. Wednesday is better if you can wait that long.

+5 Good Comment? | | Report
from mvpjr51 wrote 3 years 10 weeks ago

For me it is a bottle of Guinness Extra Stout. Not the stuff in the black bottle with the mixing ball but the brown bottle with tan label.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from Bruce E. Matthews wrote 3 years 10 weeks ago

Fresh-squeezed lime juice and home-made venison (cut with a little pork) chorizo sausage.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Del in KS wrote 3 years 10 weeks ago

One other thing. If you want heat add Tobasco sauce.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Blue Ox wrote 3 years 10 weeks ago

I like to age the venison about a week & a half before I take it off the meathooks & run it twice through the grinder. I like to make my own tomato sauce, and the tomatoes HAVE to be fresh. Some pepper jack cheese goes in next, along with some chipotle. Now, I like my chilli hot enough to peel paint- for that I take a dried ghost pepper, crush it into a fairly fine powder, & add that to the mix. I guarantee it'll blow your boots right off!

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Levi Banks wrote 3 years 10 weeks ago

I like pumpkin and curry powder in a wild turkey white chili.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Woodstock wrote 3 years 9 weeks ago

Chipotles in adobo sauce.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from steve182 wrote 3 years 9 weeks ago

...And some tomatillo-based Green Salsa.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Michael Sutherin wrote 3 years 10 weeks ago

Home grown sweet corn, not from a can. Adds a spectacular sweetness, filler and color, not to mention you get your veggies with your chili.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Proverbs wrote 3 years 10 weeks ago

Wild mustard. This plant seems to sprout everywhere during the winter and spring throughout the greater Phoenix area. After years of mowing it and pulling it out of my yard, I decided to do a little research and found this wild mustard not only edible, but is common in the southwest this time of year. It has yellow flowers and slender leaves 4-5 inches long. It is pretty spicy and strong flavored, which is why I think it does a good job in the chili. You can use it dried and crushed, but I like best when plucked fresh out of the yard and finely chopped. I toss in about 1/4 cup (chopped) into my 16-quart slow-cooker. Like anything with a unique taste, start small and figure out what you like best.

Wild mustard is really a weed, so it's best to pick it from your own yard so you can be sure it hasn't been sprayed. If you want a picture to help identify it, visit our local newspaper website and enter "wild mustard" in the search function. It will bring up a 2009 story and picture of the mustard. The site is: www.azcentral.com

Enjoy!

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from country road wrote 3 years 9 weeks ago

A couple of tablespoons of tupelo honey or molasses will help smooth out any sharp edges.

I can't wait to try some chocolate and pumpkin.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from db270 wrote 3 years 10 weeks ago

I rub my venison steak cubes with extremely fine ground coffee, brown it, and add it to the pot of chili along with a half cup of strong coffee. It adds an earthy-type kick that NO ONE can identify right off the bat. I love it because it combines two of the tastes and aromas of deer camp into one meal I can enjoy all year around.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from BearClaw wrote 3 years 10 weeks ago

My mexican girlfriend is a fine cook and has opened my eyes to many varities and flavors of peppers. To give your chili some heat, or flavor, or both- head to a Mexican grocer (if you can't find them at your grocer)and look for dried chiles de arbol (or cayenne) when you simmer you chili, which should be for a while, simply clean the peppers and put 3-4 whole peppers in the pot to simmer and absorb flavor. More peppers= more heat. Some other peppers to possibly use or experiment with (as each have distinct flavors and hotness): are the chile guajillo and chile pibil, both dried, following the same simple process.

Bottom line= it's common knowledge=peppers are a great and easy way to add flavor and heat to you chili, or any soup for that matter. A trip to a Mexican grocer will open your eyes to just how many peppers (chiles) are out there. Ask someone at the store for advice...or translation of the packet the peppers come in.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from daveygolfcunningham wrote 3 years 10 weeks ago

My black and white chili rocks. Black and northern beans, fresh corn, chunky tomatoes, small chunks of potatoe, jalepeno peppers, green and white onions, and of course, venison stew meat. Dash of sugar and mustard sets it off to the moon.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Del in KS wrote 3 years 10 weeks ago

Use very lean meat and add Extra virgin olive oil for fat. Add a chopped onion and some chopped garlic. Season with 50-50 mix of Williams chili powder and ground Cumin. Please, please NO canned tomatoes. Use enough of the spices to make it red, add a little masa flour to thicken. Sea salt to taste. One other thing is throw the spices in with the raw meat, onion, garlic and olive oil and brown it all together. Use a cast iron dutch oven for cooking chili.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from hunter6 wrote 3 years 10 weeks ago

I have two that make it awesome ... 1 st. mexican style chili powder and yes here it goes PEANUT BUTTER . Sound's weird i know but don't knock it until you try it ...

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Koldkut wrote 3 years 10 weeks ago

Along the lines of Chocolate chips, I use the old betty crocker recipe, it calls for cocoa.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from shane wrote 3 years 10 weeks ago

Just a little cinnamon. Only in some batches. Adds to that good comfort food feeling that chili already has.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from s-kfry wrote 3 years 10 weeks ago

To build on HungryHawk, use a roast, cut into 1/2 inch cubes, maybe fry first and then cook long with everything else. The meat stays together, even if significantly loosened up by slow cooking, and retains more of the game meat flavor which I think gets lost if you use ground.

This is why I ask the processor to leave as much of my meat in chunks (roast, steak, etc.) rather than grinding it up. You can always tear it apart later, but's its really hard to put ground back together (even with superglue).

Sean

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from steve182 wrote 3 years 9 weeks ago

Lots of Cilantro and i fire-roast some Jalapeno. Multi colored beans too, red black and white.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Dann wrote 3 years 10 weeks ago

Dried ground rosemary, sage and 2 crushed bay leaves. Gives the chili an "earthy" flavor. mmmmm good

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from jbird wrote 3 years 10 weeks ago

I think it's fun to change it up every time. I plan on using some dark chocolate next batch since I heard many competition chili recipes use it to add richness. I prefer making it hot, but since my kid's came along, I've had to go mild, and add hot sauce to my bowl. It's just not the same as cooking the heat in.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from John L wrote 3 years 10 weeks ago

Many years ago (too many to mention) I worked with a Hispanic guy about my age (we/he called him Mexican then) who made the best venison Green Chili ever.
All I remember was that he froze it in zip-lock bags, would then thaw it out briefly and re-freeze it several times.
He claimed that each time he thawed and re-froze it would get more tender and hotter.
Don't know the theory or the fact, but it was the best chili I ever ate.

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from Greenhead wrote 3 years 10 weeks ago

I add a bit of Kahlua. You don't actually taste it but it does give a greater depth of flavor. Like you said about the chocolate, it tastes like Mexico.

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from Drew McClure wrote 3 years 10 weeks ago

Cambell's nacho cheese, boom shaka lacka;/

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from TM wrote 3 years 10 weeks ago

Ground roasted cashews. Sounds weird, but the reason that indian currys are so rich and thick (while the ones you make at home are thin and flat) is ground cashews. Unlike starch thickeners like flour or cornmeal, ground nuts add richness to chili too. Try a 1/2 cup of ground cashews at the end of your next pot, with a tiny amount of vinegar. Thick and creamy. Yum.

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from bjohnston wrote 3 years 9 weeks ago

Add a cup of root beer. It gives it a familiar sweetness
that people just can't put their finger on.

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from thequam wrote 3 years 10 weeks ago

Nothing to crazy for me, just a great big Hershey bar. I make smokin' hot chilli and the chocolate helps to balance the heat initially.

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from ilikehunting wrote 3 years 10 weeks ago

I like to use ground Canada goose meat. It has a pretty high amount of fat and has a great texture. I like to sprinkle pepper jack cheese over the top. It has a nice creamy texture and a nice splash of heat as well. I might have to go make a batch after typing this..

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from rynodaug wrote 3 years 10 weeks ago

Kraft macaroni cheese powder!
Seriously, try it.

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from rynodaug wrote 3 years 10 weeks ago

The cheese powder works as a thickener and adds a hit of cheese flavor.

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from w_worsham wrote 3 years 10 weeks ago

Fry out 1/2 lb of "Streak-o-lean". Brown your meat in the drippings. I add finely chopped celery, onion, green onions with the tops(chopped), 1/4 cup+ chili powder, toasted, grounf cumin, salt, fresh groung black pepper, fresh sliced portabello mushrooms, Tabasco Green. Cook 2-3 hous on simmer. Serve with cornbread, grated cheese, and the Streal-o-lean crumbled up on top. Enjoy.

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from bowhuntermike wrote 3 years 9 weeks ago

bacon

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from JBgrouse23 wrote 3 years 10 weeks ago

A chocolate stout goes very well with a number of peppers. Make sure you try a bunch first though, because one that is has too much chocolate will throw off the taste

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from JustTakeMeHunting14 wrote 3 years 10 weeks ago

A few drops from a bottle of the smoke flavoring. Specifically liquid smoke brand. I know probly the last thing that should ever end up in an outdoorsmans kitchen. Artificial smoke flavoring. But it works so its fine with me.

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from dadsmom wrote 3 years 9 weeks ago

My chili recipe is pretty lame compared to what I have read so far. Just don't forget to ask me over at dinner time.

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from drenkes wrote 3 years 10 weeks ago

clamota juice instead of tamato juice

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from HungryHawk wrote 3 years 10 weeks ago

Venison from tough cuts like blade & shank braised low & slow for 24 hrs - it's rich & savory. Also Spanish smoked paprika for some round, warm smoky flavors.

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from BWilliams wrote 3 years 10 weeks ago

Half a can of pumpkin mellows out spicy flavors really nice. Yes, canned pumpkin, the same stuff your wife uses to make pies for Thanksgiving. I also use an immersion blender to smooth out the beans and other veggies before I add deer sausage to the mix. Next time you make chili, add pumpkin and blend it just a bit. Trust me. It's good!

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from Kormos wrote 3 years 10 weeks ago

My secret is fresh chopped Cilantro, almost a whole bunch without the stems, boil this down with a can of cheap domestic beer, it adds Tex-Mex flavor, (also good in a pot of red beans). It also helps to listen to Crosby. Stills, Nash and Young while cooking.

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from sdstewart wrote 3 years 10 weeks ago

It sounds weird but a three inch piece of dried ginger. Not fresh and not powdered. Just let it simmer in the chili for a few hours.

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from brktrt-18 wrote 3 years 9 weeks ago

I use a cast iron pot on the stove and after browning the meat and frying up the onions, peppers, and garlic I deglaze the pot with Aecht Schlenkerla Rauchbier (German smoked beer). The natural smoked flavor in a dark beer with minimal hops works perfectly.

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from murdock32 wrote 3 years 9 weeks ago

I can't understand the chocolate??? sounds like mixin cheddar cheese and bananas.

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from vork23 wrote 3 years 10 weeks ago

hersheys chocolate bar. it makes it a slightly sweat and makes the spicyness of the chilly more flavorful got the idea from using cocoa but was out of cocoa and i had a candy bar on hand and it turned out better than using the cocoa.

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from RichardF wrote 3 years 10 weeks ago

Fritos Scoops... You don't have to use a spoon (better for Camping) and it also adds a good texture. I know it's not in the chili but it adds so much to the meal.

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from Jacee wrote 3 years 8 weeks ago

Instead of venison...elk!

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from kyka1865 wrote 3 years 9 weeks ago

I am a cincinnati native and the fact that many of you add chocolate is not surprising. Rumor has it that chocolate is a key ingredientin the Skyline chili recipe. I love Cincinnati chili and all other typpes of chili but most Cincinnati natives would agree that Cincinnati is chili is a whole different category of chili, not to be compared to good texas or game chili.

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from Brian W. Thair wrote 3 years 9 weeks ago

My recipe was the winner in a major chili cook off, the fools published it in the newspaper. Two key ingredients: the vinegar and the cumin. Use two pots, make 20 meals at a time. Freeze. Thanks for the cocoa idea. . . should help.

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from 2Poppa wrote 3 years 9 weeks ago

Hil- I agree with your assessment of "time." What I do is to cook the meat the night before along with the spices. The next day I begin to slowly warm the meat adding the rest of the ingredients slowly, and then I add the beans last. This simple procedure gives my chili, the "next day flavor!"

I always use the finest, healthiest ingredients and take NO short-cuts, allowing the meat and spices to meld their individual favors with the beans and peppers in a single dish. I use "soy crumbles" which has no saturated fat or cholesterol, instead of beef burger.

Being from the Cincinnati area, we love our chili, so I usually make variations and allow the crowd to choose the tastiest. There is never any left.

1.) I make a blackened venison tenderloin chili:
One taste and you have to have more. It has of course venison tenderloin,1 lb.- 1/4-inch dice. 2-lbs.Sun-dried, Tomato Wild Turkey Sausage, skinned and diced. 3-lbs. Deer Sirloin.
One bite of this chili concoction causes the palate to connect and explode with a robust flavor causing the brain to ask, "What is in this?" The sun-dried Tomato Wild Turkey, is loaded with flavor causing the chili to pop!

2.) A Creole inspired chili:
1-lb. of venison burger. 1-lb. of chorizo sausage, with casing removed. 1-Red Anaheim Pepper, 1-Green Anaheim Pepper, both diced. 2-lb. Black Beans. 1-lb. Black-eyed peas. 16ounces- fresh green chilies. 1-cup of okra. 1-1/2 tablespoons dried japones or arbol chilies, 6 tablespoons cilantro. 2-Bottles of Newcastle Brown Ale.

This chili is served up in a bowl over rice or Creole dirty rice, with a sprinklin' of fresh green onions and a light sprinklin' of blue cheese crumbles. Cornbread is never optional! I make mine with jalapeño’s.
It is a surprise to most people who have never tried this style chili with the rice, but one taste and all you'll hear ... Mmm, Mmm!

3.) I also make an Asian chili:
After the Vietnam War I trained some of the refugees and would get invited to their house for dinner ... they really knew how to cook.

Vietnam chili has, Fresh Green Thai chilies, Beef Tenderloin - cooked in 1/4 cup peanut oil.1-1/2 tablespoon of FISH SAUCE... garlic, cilantro, and sugar. Heat it at high temperature.
To say the least, this dish is HOT, HOT, HOT, and I usually have fresh mango or mandarin oranges to cool the typical American palate.
This is a unique style chili dish that I almost always serve with a couple of other style chilies for guests who want to experience Asian Cuisine.

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from DanCS wrote 3 years 9 weeks ago

Along with my diced Venison and Venison Chorizo, I like to sneak in a good bit of Tasso. And in the last 10 min of simmering, a binch of cinnamon wakes up the flavors. There, now you know my secrets.

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from Lilhunter wrote 3 years 9 weeks ago

Maple Syrup....

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from wfbrad wrote 3 years 9 weeks ago

Paprika. I love that flavor along with dried red chili pods, cooked all day, with lots of white spanish onions and cumino. Also use pinto, small red, black, and dark kidney beans.

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from crosshairy wrote 3 years 9 weeks ago

I started using ground venison chorizo sausage instead of traditional ground beef/venison a couple of years ago. Some deer processors offer this as an option, or you can make it yourself. This is especially effective when cooking for folks that are not fans of wild game, because the taste is different enough that I've never had someone recognize it.

I typically add one part chorizo to one part regular ground (beef/chicken/turkey/venison) to give the flavor and texture some dynamics. Using chorizo in combination with another kind of meet moderates the seasoning (no spice overload) and gives the chili a more complex taste and feel, which impresses people :)

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from smallgamehunter25 wrote 3 years 9 weeks ago

bout a dozen mini marshmallows for a medium sized pot

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from waldman79 wrote 3 years 9 weeks ago

A single drop of Dave's Insanity Sauce and one bottle of Bud Light. One, just one drop of Dave's puts the fire in the chili - more than one makes it painful.

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from tjfslaughter wrote 3 years 10 weeks ago

Toasted then crushed Cumin

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from Hil wrote 3 years 10 weeks ago

You need to google up a recipe for Cincinnati or Skyline chili and make a batch at home. It IS awesome.

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from Craigb wrote 3 years 9 weeks ago

I use Tequila but not the good stuff. You need the cheapest you can find.

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from bowhuntermike wrote 3 years 9 weeks ago

bacon,velvita with a little cumin and red peper flakes ..soo good

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from Palehorse wrote 3 years 9 weeks ago

Smoke and then grind the venison.

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from kansasjeff wrote 3 years 9 weeks ago

one thing I always add to my chilli is some turmeric and some brown curry powder. It goes well with the chillies and the peppers and gives it an earthy tase.

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from 81Chief wrote 3 years 9 weeks ago

I add Garlic.....May as well add bad breath to the aftermath of the chili!!!

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from Brock12Gauge wrote 3 years 10 weeks ago

I love to add small chunks of self harvested "smoked" duck breast! It compliments any variety of chili pepper and adds a nice smokey taste to the entire pot!

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from jaimecherry2 wrote 3 years 10 weeks ago

I always add a Sam Adams the last 30 min. of simmering and I saute the chopped onions and mushrooms in a Cab or Merlot.

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from lbuhman wrote 3 years 10 weeks ago

Add some nutmeg! Most people think of baking with it, but it really adds a great spice flavor.

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from OwlTalonz wrote 3 years 9 weeks ago

Whole Grain Soy Sauce

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from contester wrote 3 years 9 weeks ago

I like to use several types of beans, and hominy. Also a tablespoon of cocoa powder.

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from goldenhook wrote 3 years 9 weeks ago

chopped black olives and corn

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from Scott Alexander wrote 3 years 9 weeks ago

dark chocolate

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from Cowboy2 wrote 3 years 9 weeks ago

Maple Syrup , Semi-Sweet Chocolate , and Dark Beer

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from Lilhunter wrote 3 years 9 weeks ago

I put a lil' heiney (heineken) in it.. to help my heiney later! FELL THE BURN! :)

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from prohunter11 wrote 3 years 10 weeks ago

To cans of chili magic is the only way to go fast and easy

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from BWilliams wrote 3 years 10 weeks ago

Half a can of pumpkin mellows out spicy flavors really nice. Yes, canned pumpkin, the same stuff your wife uses to make pies for Thanksgiving. I also use an immersion blender to smooth out the beans and other veggies before I add deer sausage to the mix. Next time you make chili, add pumpkin and blend it just a bit. Trust me. It's good!

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