Please Sign In

Please enter a valid username and password
  • Log in with Facebook
» Not a member? Take a moment to register
» Forgot Username or Password

Why Register?
Signing up could earn you gear (click here to learn how)! It also keeps offensive content off our site.

Cemeteries: The Perfect Suburban Training Grounds For Your Dog

Recent Comments

Categories

Recent Posts

Archives

Syndicate

Google Reader or Homepage
Add to My Yahoo!
Add to My AOL

Man's Best Friend
in your Inbox

Enter your email address to get our new post everyday.

March 28, 2011

Cemeteries: The Perfect Suburban Training Grounds For Your Dog

By Chad Love

Last week in my blog post on solo training I solicited comments on what you'd like to read more of, and info on solo training, plus "creative uses of land available in a neighborhood" for training were two answers. I have previously written about my own never-ending search for training grounds, noting that I've been kicked off golf courses, soccer fields, and mall parking lots. But there's one place I haven't tried.

I have to admit that for sheer creepy training creativity I can't touch my friend from Ducks Unlimited, James Card. Like all gundog owners who live and work in large metro areas, James is always on the hunt for new training grounds. This January when he and his dog Radar drove out for a late-season pheasant hunt, he told me about a great new training spot he discovered. It was quiet, spacious, empty and training didn't seem to bother the residents.

I'm talking, of course, about a cemetery. The country cemetery James found was usually void of the living, and even had some great brushy hedge rows for working his pup in cover. Creepy? Yes. Brilliant? Yes. Most cemeteries are fenced, receive very little traffic, especially on weekdays and early mornings, have large open areas perfect for yard work and drills and you can find them just about anywhere.

Now granted, there are probably some caveats to training in a cemetery. First, make sure it's legal, or at least make sure there aren’t any specific rules against it. Second, think solitude. You wouldn’t want to train on say, Memorial Day, or during funerals or whenever anyone else was there. Using bumper launchers, wingers, starter pistols or incessant yells or whistle blasts should be avoided. Using headstones to set up your blinds is probably a no-no. And for sure you'd want to leave any random bones your dog may happen to bring back to you. But if you do it in a respectful manner and when no one else was around, pick up after yourself and your dog, a local cemetery may just turn out to be an underground training hit.

 

Comments (12)

Top Rated
All Comments
from MLH wrote 3 years 2 weeks ago

That photo reminds me of a spooky old cemetery we had to cross to get to some great squirrel woods. In the dark, damp, early mornings the heavy swirling fog covered all but the tops of the headstones. Nothing like tiptoeing through a haunted graveyard, tripping, and face-planting in front of an ancient tombstone - doubly so if it was your hunting buddy. There'd be his scream as you glanced him falling in a puff of fog. Then the hound would bark.

Trust me - on one of those retrieves something will make your neck hairs stand up and be noticed.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from basset hound wrote 3 years 2 weeks ago

This is not a bad idea, but there is something you may need to be aware of in cemeteries. In a few months Sons of Confederate veterans will be putting small flags on the veterans’ graves and this can be a distraction to a dog. I had a basset hound, which dad walked in the cemetery in May. Dad sat down on a bench for a rest and soon the basset hound presents him with a small Confederate flag. Dad tried to figure out whose grave had lost a flag and the basset hound started getting more flags as they flapped in the breeze. Dad tried to replace the flags, but I am sure there are a few families surprised to find out their grandpa born in 1922 was a Confederate veteran.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from basset hound wrote 3 years 2 weeks ago

This is not a bad idea, but there is something you may need to be aware of in cemeteries. In a few months Sons of Confederate veterans will be putting small flags on the veterans’ graves and this can be a distraction to a dog. I had a basset hound, which dad walked in the cemetery in May. Dad sat down on a bench for a rest and soon the basset hound presents him with a small Confederate flag. Dad tried to figure out whose grave had lost a flag and the basset hound started getting more flags as they flapped in the breeze. Dad tried to replace the flags, but I am sure there are a few families surprised to find out their grandpa born in 1922 was a Confederate veteran.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Redneck Rockstar wrote 3 years 2 weeks ago

I don't think this is a good idea at all. A cemetery is just not the place for this sort of activity. Simply by implying that one should make sure nobody is around, should be your first hint that this is an unacceptable practice. I am personally not easily offended, but if I saw Sparky the wonder retriever squatting on my mother's final resting place or some random person trouncing all over the graves of the deceased I'd be a little more than upset. Surely one could find a park, a school playground, or the very grounds they hunt for such training?

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from conjugation wrote 3 years 2 weeks ago

This picture reminds me of my bad experience hunting days. lol, it was scary though.
mec presses

-1 Good Comment? | | Report
from bj264 wrote 3 years 2 weeks ago

To get to one of my favorite duck hunting spots I cross a cemetery. I was a bit disturbed this past season when I looked over and caught my dog with his leg hiked at a grave stone. As I quickly put him on the leash all I could think of was, nothing good would come of this. Had to be some bad karma there somewhere.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from jamesti wrote 3 years 2 weeks ago

i think if someone sees you doing this, they would be angry and it may give us a bad name. just doesn't seem right.

+4 Good Comment? | | Report
from country road wrote 3 years 2 weeks ago

I don't think it's a very good idea. Although the residents probably won't mind, the families might tend to think it's disrespectful. There's gotta be a better place.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from mnobles23 wrote 3 years 2 weeks ago

Call me crazy, but I actually like the idea of my final resting place being used for something I love: dogs and dog training. If people start doing this I might just have to have a small fountain installed at the base of my tombstone just so the dogs have a place to drink. :)

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from scotchbob wrote 3 years 2 weeks ago

Has society's moral compass become so disoriented that it is deemed acceptable to use a graveyard for dog training. Do the terms hallowed ground and common decency mean so little to some people?

-1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Ontario Honker ... wrote 3 years 1 week ago

Virtually all suburban cemeteries that I know of DO NOT allow pets, either on or off leash. Some folks just don't care to have anything peeing or pooping on their ancestors if it can be avoided. Imgaine that. The deer are all over my wife and son's grave sites but I think they would like that. And I know they wouldn't mind the dogs either. But we have to respect everyone's sensativities, especially when grieving is concerned. I would be VERY cautious about running my dogs around any cemetery.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from nwild wrote 2 years 51 weeks ago

It is a question
of
RESPECT...period. There are better places to piss people off.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report

Post a Comment

from jamesti wrote 3 years 2 weeks ago

i think if someone sees you doing this, they would be angry and it may give us a bad name. just doesn't seem right.

+4 Good Comment? | | Report
from Redneck Rockstar wrote 3 years 2 weeks ago

I don't think this is a good idea at all. A cemetery is just not the place for this sort of activity. Simply by implying that one should make sure nobody is around, should be your first hint that this is an unacceptable practice. I am personally not easily offended, but if I saw Sparky the wonder retriever squatting on my mother's final resting place or some random person trouncing all over the graves of the deceased I'd be a little more than upset. Surely one could find a park, a school playground, or the very grounds they hunt for such training?

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from MLH wrote 3 years 2 weeks ago

That photo reminds me of a spooky old cemetery we had to cross to get to some great squirrel woods. In the dark, damp, early mornings the heavy swirling fog covered all but the tops of the headstones. Nothing like tiptoeing through a haunted graveyard, tripping, and face-planting in front of an ancient tombstone - doubly so if it was your hunting buddy. There'd be his scream as you glanced him falling in a puff of fog. Then the hound would bark.

Trust me - on one of those retrieves something will make your neck hairs stand up and be noticed.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from basset hound wrote 3 years 2 weeks ago

This is not a bad idea, but there is something you may need to be aware of in cemeteries. In a few months Sons of Confederate veterans will be putting small flags on the veterans’ graves and this can be a distraction to a dog. I had a basset hound, which dad walked in the cemetery in May. Dad sat down on a bench for a rest and soon the basset hound presents him with a small Confederate flag. Dad tried to figure out whose grave had lost a flag and the basset hound started getting more flags as they flapped in the breeze. Dad tried to replace the flags, but I am sure there are a few families surprised to find out their grandpa born in 1922 was a Confederate veteran.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from bj264 wrote 3 years 2 weeks ago

To get to one of my favorite duck hunting spots I cross a cemetery. I was a bit disturbed this past season when I looked over and caught my dog with his leg hiked at a grave stone. As I quickly put him on the leash all I could think of was, nothing good would come of this. Had to be some bad karma there somewhere.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from nwild wrote 2 years 51 weeks ago

It is a question
of
RESPECT...period. There are better places to piss people off.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from basset hound wrote 3 years 2 weeks ago

This is not a bad idea, but there is something you may need to be aware of in cemeteries. In a few months Sons of Confederate veterans will be putting small flags on the veterans’ graves and this can be a distraction to a dog. I had a basset hound, which dad walked in the cemetery in May. Dad sat down on a bench for a rest and soon the basset hound presents him with a small Confederate flag. Dad tried to figure out whose grave had lost a flag and the basset hound started getting more flags as they flapped in the breeze. Dad tried to replace the flags, but I am sure there are a few families surprised to find out their grandpa born in 1922 was a Confederate veteran.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from country road wrote 3 years 2 weeks ago

I don't think it's a very good idea. Although the residents probably won't mind, the families might tend to think it's disrespectful. There's gotta be a better place.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from mnobles23 wrote 3 years 2 weeks ago

Call me crazy, but I actually like the idea of my final resting place being used for something I love: dogs and dog training. If people start doing this I might just have to have a small fountain installed at the base of my tombstone just so the dogs have a place to drink. :)

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Ontario Honker ... wrote 3 years 1 week ago

Virtually all suburban cemeteries that I know of DO NOT allow pets, either on or off leash. Some folks just don't care to have anything peeing or pooping on their ancestors if it can be avoided. Imgaine that. The deer are all over my wife and son's grave sites but I think they would like that. And I know they wouldn't mind the dogs either. But we have to respect everyone's sensativities, especially when grieving is concerned. I would be VERY cautious about running my dogs around any cemetery.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from conjugation wrote 3 years 2 weeks ago

This picture reminds me of my bad experience hunting days. lol, it was scary though.
mec presses

-1 Good Comment? | | Report
from scotchbob wrote 3 years 2 weeks ago

Has society's moral compass become so disoriented that it is deemed acceptable to use a graveyard for dog training. Do the terms hallowed ground and common decency mean so little to some people?

-1 Good Comment? | | Report

Post a Comment

bmxbiz-fs