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A First Day Stray: What Would You Do?

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April 05, 2011

A First Day Stray: What Would You Do?

By Chad Love

The dog comes trotting up to the car as soon as I pull into the parking area, a rangy-looking orange belton setter that looks like he hasn't eaten in a few days. He's dirty, his coat is full of cockleburs, his paws are full of sandburs, his ribs stick out from his side and he isn't wearing a collar. That's telling. No one hunts their dog without a collar and tags. This setter wasn't lost, some sonofa**** had abandoned him, left him to die. Dumped him out in the middle of nowhere with no food, no water and no chance.

He looks tired, hungry, scared and lonely. It's mid-week during the last half of the Kansas pheasant season, I'm 30 miles from the nearest town and I haven't seen another hunter all day.

Who knows how long he's been out here, hiding from coyotes and waiting for someone, anyone, to come along. He stands off a few feet and eyes me, but when I kneel and give him a soft whistle he walks up, gives my hand a raspy lick and then presents his head for scratching, tail beating a staccato rhythm against the car. I pour him a bowl of water and give him some of my dog's food. Both disappear almost instantly. When I let my dog out of the car he bounces around like a pup, playing and chasing. But when I grab my gun and try to whistle him up to go hunting he just sits his haunches by the car and looks at me as I walk off. "Sorry nice man," the look says, "but I've had my fill of this place. I just wanna get the hell outta here."

I go back, open the car's hatchback, open my dog's crate and before I can even say the word "kennel" he jumps in and lies down. So I leave him like that, with the windows cracked and the hatchback open in the shade of a tree.

I take my dog and hunt for a while, but when I come back I'm faced with what to do about my guest: I'm 150 miles from home, I'm on the first day of a three-day hunt and since I'm hunting out of my wife's old car, it's literally packed to the roof with gear. I only have one crate, and it's only big enough for one dog. I simply have nowhere to put him. To complicate things, I'm meeting two other hunters that evening and I'm not at all sure they'd appreciate me showing up and asking if they have any room in their dog box for some stray I picked up out in the country.

What would you do?

Comments (34)

Top Rated
All Comments
from rustyt wrote 3 years 1 week ago

I couldn't leave him. Sacrifice some hunting time and take him into town. I'm sure the hunting Gods would look favorably upon you.

+9 Good Comment? | | Report
from zoerbr wrote 3 years 1 week ago

save him,there is no other choice really.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from GiantWhitetails wrote 3 years 1 week ago

I would have to take him. I'd take a picture and put it by the parking lot with my contact info, in case he was lost and bein looked for.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from ggmack wrote 3 years 1 week ago

No choice, take him to town. I had a similar encounter a few years back took the dog to the town sheriff. Only option was hold the dog in a cell til I was headed home. Named him bounce cause all he could do was bounce when I found him.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Douglas wrote 3 years 1 week ago

Take him out of there. Its the moral and ethical thing to do. He might have a microchip which would give contact info for the "owner" who dumped him.
Lots of gun dogs in the rescues these days.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Jeff Bowers wrote 3 years 1 week ago

That pretty much would have been the end of my hunt. I would have taken the dog home, then and there. Then it would be getting fed while I either called up my friends in Rescue, or would become my 'other' other dog.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from DSMbirddog wrote 3 years 1 week ago

Find him a spot to be boarded and cleaned up. I'd pick him back up when I head home.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from ALJoe wrote 3 years 1 week ago

This summer we returned from vacation to find a Border Collie setting on the front steps. We live out in the country on a dead end road so strays come and go every so often. But this dog was different. It was quite obvious she had been abandoned. I started working with her. She was super smart and before long I had her trained to do many things. Today, we love her and have accepted her into the family. But, I still can not imagine why someone would abandon a dog of this caliber.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from hair_boxers wrote 3 years 1 week ago

Worst thing you do is take him to town. Best thing you do is take him home and either foster him or adopt him.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from 2Poppa wrote 3 years 1 week ago

I would have taken him with me and purchased an inexpensive dog harness along with a sturdy leash, to insure that he didn't escape from my rescue attempt.
The harness would have allowed me to make a "seatbelt" for the setter, while he sat next to me as I drove to meet my friends.

Explaining my dilemma to my friends, a better, simplier solution could have possibly came about. If not, I would have tethered the setter, providing food, water and a make shift shelter until my return each day.

After my three-day hunt, I would have taken him home and made him part of my family.

One of the best dogs I ever had, was found a week before Christmas, out in the frigid wilderness while I was deer huntin'. It was an Austrailian Blue Heeler, that was eating acorns to survive. She was using an old abandoned car, that was loosing its existence to rust, for shelter.

After the second day of the hunt, I soon realized, just as the old car had been abandoned, the Blue Heeler had been too. Much to my amazement, I soon noticed she had a knack for catchin' and treein' squirrels. Once a squirrel ran up a tree, she would back up and slowly walk around the tree trying to get an eye on the elusive squirrel. If it jumped form the tree to another one she would follow it.

Holly, the Blue Heeler, was the best squirrel dog I had ever seen. She was a treasure that simply had been tossed aside until I discovered her.

What did you choose to do Chad?

+7 Good Comment? | | Report
from jbird wrote 3 years 1 week ago

I'd have to save it. So, what did you do?

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from jersey pig wrote 3 years 1 week ago

have to take the dog. it would end or seriously limit my hunt and my wife would kill me (but she'd do the same thing or she wouldnt be my wife)but you cant leave it there to die. all we had when i was a kid was strays and they were great loyal dogs.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from R.U. Effingme wrote 3 years 1 week ago

No way I could leave a dog in a situation like that...He'd go home with me. There's always room for one more.

And I want to reach out to everyone who previously posted and say, "Thanks." It's good to read great, positive comments from a bunch of good folks. Y'all made my day.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from bass bomber wrote 3 years 1 week ago

I'd keep the dog. Its not like you can just leave him to die.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from jamesti wrote 3 years 1 week ago

i'd cancel the evening hunt, take the dog home, and pay a visit to my vet. a dog is worth more than one hunt. what did you do?

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Mark-1 wrote 3 years 1 week ago

Fate works in strange ways and I'm superstitious. Finding a dog in such location and unexpected are the animal spirits saying something to you personally. I'd take the dog as a their gift. Your buddies, if they're outdoorsmen and hunters, be most understanding. Maybe the dog be meant for one of them.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from hengst wrote 3 years 1 week ago

I would have to really hope that my wife liked the dog, because he would be coming home with me. Of course I would do the old "found dog" routine but I doubt anyone would claim him. I couldn't leave a peacefull non aggressive animal out like that. Then again all but one of my dogs have been strays or rescue dogs

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from bj264 wrote 3 years 1 week ago

You bring the dog with you. No other choice.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Judd McCullum wrote 3 years 1 week ago

Gun dog or not, he'd would be my best friend until I found a better home for him. I agree with everyone's good intentions, but I wouldn't leave him in town to be just another dog the shelter or pound can't or won't afford to feed.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Blue Ox wrote 3 years 1 week ago

The dog would come with me.
I can always hunt another day, and it's not everyday that one gets to save a life & make a new friend in the process.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from chadlove wrote 3 years 1 week ago

Great replies, and as you can probably guess, the dog came with me. It'd take a pretty damn heartless person to leave a dog in conditions like that, so I rearranged my gear, stuck him in the kennel while my dog rode in the passenger seat, and we headed for town.

Since it was after hours,I had trouble reaching anyone with the city, and had decided to just give up, take the dog home and figure out what to do next, but I finally reached a very nice police officer who told me to bring him down to the station and she'd take him.

Dog and cop hit it off immediately, and she told me she was just going to pretend that I had not found the dog outside city limits. She also said she had someone in mind who would be very interested in him and that he would probably go to the animal shelter for a few days just on the off-chance that someone was looking for him, and then he would almost certainly be adopted...

I'll be honest, I thought very hard about keeping him, and if I'd gotten the impression he was simply going to be put down in a few days I would have and then tried to find him a home (keeping him permamently just wasn't physically possible. At the time I was already over my dog limit and simply didn't have space for another).

But it was obvious from the start that I was passing him off to a fellow dog person, and I'm confident he ended up in a better place than where I found him.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from Hoski wrote 3 years 1 week ago

There's really no dilema here. Save the dog.
Many posters have said it, the stray is worth more than a hunt.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from HeidelbergJaeger wrote 3 years 1 week ago

I'd have to skip the hunt and get that dog taken care of. Whether off to a no kill shelter or fostering it for a while, its worth it.

I had a bad storm blow through Ft. Hood a while back- came back from a night's dinner, and there was a wet, shivering and frightened dog (still don't know what breed) hiding in my garbage alcove. Not knowing if the dog was aggressive or friendly, I set out water and food. Within seconds, the dog's demeanor changed and the tail wagged uncontrollably as she ate what I put out for her. As if to say thank you, she promptly sat and looked up at me and offered her paw.

We fostered her for a few months, and got her shots and medications for heart worm. We put signs up in the housing area and also put an add in the local paper but still no one claimed her. We ended up giving her to a nice family that we had known he had recently lost a pet to old age.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from yellowvane wrote 3 years 1 week ago

I foster for a group called Stray Rescue of St. Louis so this story hits home for me. Dogs are left to fend for themselves everyday, neglected by the selfish owners who left them to basically suffer. It is our duty as conscious, decision-making adults to make sure that we give them a chance. That being said, any alternative is better than the situation the dog had been in. There are groups who will take dogs off your hands and provide them with good care if you are not able to do so yourself. I think that any hunter would welcome a trained and obedient dog and if not they don't deserve the privilege of having one

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from childress242 wrote 3 years 1 week ago

What ever it takes to get him home. If folks don't want a dog then don't abandon it. They need to have the decency to at Least take him to a rescue group. That is the Very Least!!

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Coachcl wrote 3 years 1 week ago

I actually had that experience this year. Just going out fishing one day, I was driving out to the pond when in the middle of the road curled up in some mud was this little black dog....part miniature pinscher part chihuahua...as you can guess he is tiny and not a hunter....and what most would call ugly....but he is a family favorite now....picked him up and he has a great personality....took him to vet..got shots....now he is the best lap dog in Missouri....he and my english setters get along great.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from bbainbridge wrote 3 years 1 week ago

Definitely take the pup and either keep her or find a new home for her. Here's another one though. Two years ago one of the people in our hunting party (who I can't say one good thing about) brought a 10 week old Chesapeak puppy to block for pheasant with him. The puppy had never heard any gunfire or loud noises. Of course when the first birds got up and the shooting started the little thing became incredibly frightened and ran off. The guy didn't even put much effort into finding before Dad and I went to look for it later in the day. Fortunately the pasture had varment wire around the bottom so she couldn't escape that 20 acres. I found her curled up and shaking in the far corner. The guy was standing out there when I found her so I had to give her back, but if he had just given her up for dead (one quote was "f#$% it the dog is dead") I was planning on stashing her at the neighbors till the week ended and re-homed her back in Idaho. Of course the pup is incredibly gun-shy now.
What would anyone here have done?

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Clay Cooper wrote 3 years 1 week ago

A few months ago as I was coming home late one night, I noticed off on the side of the road up in someone’s yard Weimaraner running lose. I called it but the Boy only would come within 30 feet and run. So I went to the house and got my German Shorthair and of course Boys are going to do what Boys do best, follow the Girl home! The following day I took the lost one to my Vet and she scanned it for ID Chip, no luck. My Vet took it upon herself to call al the Animal Shelters that we found someone’s lost buddy. Just shortly after noon, a fella called asking about the lost Weimaraner as if it was one of his kids.

The point I’m trying to drive home is, if you Buddy doesn’t have an ID Chip don’t you think you owe it to your Best Friend to get one. The next time this happens, this Fella may not be so lucky

Weimaraner and German Shorthair would be one crazy looking critter if I was put into the position of keeping it!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Clay Cooper wrote 3 years 1 week ago

childress242

You picture looks like shooting SS109, 5.56 62GR GREEN TIP out of a AR15 with 1-14 twist barrel, need at least a 1-9 twist!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from iron giant wrote 3 years 1 week ago

Would have probably kept him. Would have either ended the hunt then or took him to town till after the hunt.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from badcapone wrote 3 years 1 week ago

Plain and simple I would have a 3rd dog

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from coachsjike wrote 3 years 1 week ago

take him home, clean him up, and let both of my boys and wife love him up to become part of our family.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from jeffisutherland wrote 3 years 1 week ago

Take the dog, get him to a vet, and tell your buddies that there are some things more important than being in the field all the time. This dog needs love and you are the one who can provide it.

Plus it will be one hell of a good story when people ask about your hunting success!

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from deerslayer1252338 wrote 3 years 6 days ago

keep him train him you never know he might just be the best dog you'll ever have.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Mark Scanlan wrote 3 years 3 days ago

What a once in a lifetime hunt...no question about it...I would save the dog one way or another...dog is God spelled backwards...

0 Good Comment? | | Report

Post a Comment

from rustyt wrote 3 years 1 week ago

I couldn't leave him. Sacrifice some hunting time and take him into town. I'm sure the hunting Gods would look favorably upon you.

+9 Good Comment? | | Report
from 2Poppa wrote 3 years 1 week ago

I would have taken him with me and purchased an inexpensive dog harness along with a sturdy leash, to insure that he didn't escape from my rescue attempt.
The harness would have allowed me to make a "seatbelt" for the setter, while he sat next to me as I drove to meet my friends.

Explaining my dilemma to my friends, a better, simplier solution could have possibly came about. If not, I would have tethered the setter, providing food, water and a make shift shelter until my return each day.

After my three-day hunt, I would have taken him home and made him part of my family.

One of the best dogs I ever had, was found a week before Christmas, out in the frigid wilderness while I was deer huntin'. It was an Austrailian Blue Heeler, that was eating acorns to survive. She was using an old abandoned car, that was loosing its existence to rust, for shelter.

After the second day of the hunt, I soon realized, just as the old car had been abandoned, the Blue Heeler had been too. Much to my amazement, I soon noticed she had a knack for catchin' and treein' squirrels. Once a squirrel ran up a tree, she would back up and slowly walk around the tree trying to get an eye on the elusive squirrel. If it jumped form the tree to another one she would follow it.

Holly, the Blue Heeler, was the best squirrel dog I had ever seen. She was a treasure that simply had been tossed aside until I discovered her.

What did you choose to do Chad?

+7 Good Comment? | | Report
from zoerbr wrote 3 years 1 week ago

save him,there is no other choice really.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from hengst wrote 3 years 1 week ago

I would have to really hope that my wife liked the dog, because he would be coming home with me. Of course I would do the old "found dog" routine but I doubt anyone would claim him. I couldn't leave a peacefull non aggressive animal out like that. Then again all but one of my dogs have been strays or rescue dogs

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from chadlove wrote 3 years 1 week ago

Great replies, and as you can probably guess, the dog came with me. It'd take a pretty damn heartless person to leave a dog in conditions like that, so I rearranged my gear, stuck him in the kennel while my dog rode in the passenger seat, and we headed for town.

Since it was after hours,I had trouble reaching anyone with the city, and had decided to just give up, take the dog home and figure out what to do next, but I finally reached a very nice police officer who told me to bring him down to the station and she'd take him.

Dog and cop hit it off immediately, and she told me she was just going to pretend that I had not found the dog outside city limits. She also said she had someone in mind who would be very interested in him and that he would probably go to the animal shelter for a few days just on the off-chance that someone was looking for him, and then he would almost certainly be adopted...

I'll be honest, I thought very hard about keeping him, and if I'd gotten the impression he was simply going to be put down in a few days I would have and then tried to find him a home (keeping him permamently just wasn't physically possible. At the time I was already over my dog limit and simply didn't have space for another).

But it was obvious from the start that I was passing him off to a fellow dog person, and I'm confident he ended up in a better place than where I found him.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from ggmack wrote 3 years 1 week ago

No choice, take him to town. I had a similar encounter a few years back took the dog to the town sheriff. Only option was hold the dog in a cell til I was headed home. Named him bounce cause all he could do was bounce when I found him.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Jeff Bowers wrote 3 years 1 week ago

That pretty much would have been the end of my hunt. I would have taken the dog home, then and there. Then it would be getting fed while I either called up my friends in Rescue, or would become my 'other' other dog.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from ALJoe wrote 3 years 1 week ago

This summer we returned from vacation to find a Border Collie setting on the front steps. We live out in the country on a dead end road so strays come and go every so often. But this dog was different. It was quite obvious she had been abandoned. I started working with her. She was super smart and before long I had her trained to do many things. Today, we love her and have accepted her into the family. But, I still can not imagine why someone would abandon a dog of this caliber.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from hair_boxers wrote 3 years 1 week ago

Worst thing you do is take him to town. Best thing you do is take him home and either foster him or adopt him.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from jersey pig wrote 3 years 1 week ago

have to take the dog. it would end or seriously limit my hunt and my wife would kill me (but she'd do the same thing or she wouldnt be my wife)but you cant leave it there to die. all we had when i was a kid was strays and they were great loyal dogs.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from R.U. Effingme wrote 3 years 1 week ago

No way I could leave a dog in a situation like that...He'd go home with me. There's always room for one more.

And I want to reach out to everyone who previously posted and say, "Thanks." It's good to read great, positive comments from a bunch of good folks. Y'all made my day.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from jamesti wrote 3 years 1 week ago

i'd cancel the evening hunt, take the dog home, and pay a visit to my vet. a dog is worth more than one hunt. what did you do?

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from GiantWhitetails wrote 3 years 1 week ago

I would have to take him. I'd take a picture and put it by the parking lot with my contact info, in case he was lost and bein looked for.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Douglas wrote 3 years 1 week ago

Take him out of there. Its the moral and ethical thing to do. He might have a microchip which would give contact info for the "owner" who dumped him.
Lots of gun dogs in the rescues these days.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from jbird wrote 3 years 1 week ago

I'd have to save it. So, what did you do?

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from bass bomber wrote 3 years 1 week ago

I'd keep the dog. Its not like you can just leave him to die.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Mark-1 wrote 3 years 1 week ago

Fate works in strange ways and I'm superstitious. Finding a dog in such location and unexpected are the animal spirits saying something to you personally. I'd take the dog as a their gift. Your buddies, if they're outdoorsmen and hunters, be most understanding. Maybe the dog be meant for one of them.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from bj264 wrote 3 years 1 week ago

You bring the dog with you. No other choice.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Judd McCullum wrote 3 years 1 week ago

Gun dog or not, he'd would be my best friend until I found a better home for him. I agree with everyone's good intentions, but I wouldn't leave him in town to be just another dog the shelter or pound can't or won't afford to feed.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Blue Ox wrote 3 years 1 week ago

The dog would come with me.
I can always hunt another day, and it's not everyday that one gets to save a life & make a new friend in the process.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Hoski wrote 3 years 1 week ago

There's really no dilema here. Save the dog.
Many posters have said it, the stray is worth more than a hunt.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from HeidelbergJaeger wrote 3 years 1 week ago

I'd have to skip the hunt and get that dog taken care of. Whether off to a no kill shelter or fostering it for a while, its worth it.

I had a bad storm blow through Ft. Hood a while back- came back from a night's dinner, and there was a wet, shivering and frightened dog (still don't know what breed) hiding in my garbage alcove. Not knowing if the dog was aggressive or friendly, I set out water and food. Within seconds, the dog's demeanor changed and the tail wagged uncontrollably as she ate what I put out for her. As if to say thank you, she promptly sat and looked up at me and offered her paw.

We fostered her for a few months, and got her shots and medications for heart worm. We put signs up in the housing area and also put an add in the local paper but still no one claimed her. We ended up giving her to a nice family that we had known he had recently lost a pet to old age.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from childress242 wrote 3 years 1 week ago

What ever it takes to get him home. If folks don't want a dog then don't abandon it. They need to have the decency to at Least take him to a rescue group. That is the Very Least!!

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from bbainbridge wrote 3 years 1 week ago

Definitely take the pup and either keep her or find a new home for her. Here's another one though. Two years ago one of the people in our hunting party (who I can't say one good thing about) brought a 10 week old Chesapeak puppy to block for pheasant with him. The puppy had never heard any gunfire or loud noises. Of course when the first birds got up and the shooting started the little thing became incredibly frightened and ran off. The guy didn't even put much effort into finding before Dad and I went to look for it later in the day. Fortunately the pasture had varment wire around the bottom so she couldn't escape that 20 acres. I found her curled up and shaking in the far corner. The guy was standing out there when I found her so I had to give her back, but if he had just given her up for dead (one quote was "f#$% it the dog is dead") I was planning on stashing her at the neighbors till the week ended and re-homed her back in Idaho. Of course the pup is incredibly gun-shy now.
What would anyone here have done?

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from jeffisutherland wrote 3 years 1 week ago

Take the dog, get him to a vet, and tell your buddies that there are some things more important than being in the field all the time. This dog needs love and you are the one who can provide it.

Plus it will be one hell of a good story when people ask about your hunting success!

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from deerslayer1252338 wrote 3 years 6 days ago

keep him train him you never know he might just be the best dog you'll ever have.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from DSMbirddog wrote 3 years 1 week ago

Find him a spot to be boarded and cleaned up. I'd pick him back up when I head home.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from yellowvane wrote 3 years 1 week ago

I foster for a group called Stray Rescue of St. Louis so this story hits home for me. Dogs are left to fend for themselves everyday, neglected by the selfish owners who left them to basically suffer. It is our duty as conscious, decision-making adults to make sure that we give them a chance. That being said, any alternative is better than the situation the dog had been in. There are groups who will take dogs off your hands and provide them with good care if you are not able to do so yourself. I think that any hunter would welcome a trained and obedient dog and if not they don't deserve the privilege of having one

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Coachcl wrote 3 years 1 week ago

I actually had that experience this year. Just going out fishing one day, I was driving out to the pond when in the middle of the road curled up in some mud was this little black dog....part miniature pinscher part chihuahua...as you can guess he is tiny and not a hunter....and what most would call ugly....but he is a family favorite now....picked him up and he has a great personality....took him to vet..got shots....now he is the best lap dog in Missouri....he and my english setters get along great.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Clay Cooper wrote 3 years 1 week ago

A few months ago as I was coming home late one night, I noticed off on the side of the road up in someone’s yard Weimaraner running lose. I called it but the Boy only would come within 30 feet and run. So I went to the house and got my German Shorthair and of course Boys are going to do what Boys do best, follow the Girl home! The following day I took the lost one to my Vet and she scanned it for ID Chip, no luck. My Vet took it upon herself to call al the Animal Shelters that we found someone’s lost buddy. Just shortly after noon, a fella called asking about the lost Weimaraner as if it was one of his kids.

The point I’m trying to drive home is, if you Buddy doesn’t have an ID Chip don’t you think you owe it to your Best Friend to get one. The next time this happens, this Fella may not be so lucky

Weimaraner and German Shorthair would be one crazy looking critter if I was put into the position of keeping it!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Clay Cooper wrote 3 years 1 week ago

childress242

You picture looks like shooting SS109, 5.56 62GR GREEN TIP out of a AR15 with 1-14 twist barrel, need at least a 1-9 twist!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from iron giant wrote 3 years 1 week ago

Would have probably kept him. Would have either ended the hunt then or took him to town till after the hunt.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from badcapone wrote 3 years 1 week ago

Plain and simple I would have a 3rd dog

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from coachsjike wrote 3 years 1 week ago

take him home, clean him up, and let both of my boys and wife love him up to become part of our family.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Mark Scanlan wrote 3 years 3 days ago

What a once in a lifetime hunt...no question about it...I would save the dog one way or another...dog is God spelled backwards...

0 Good Comment? | | Report

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