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Share Your Gun Dog Tips, Win a FireKnife

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May 08, 2012

Share Your Gun Dog Tips, Win a FireKnife

By Chad Love

Who wants to win a really cool knife? I mean it, I've been playing around with one for the past couple weeks, and I gotta say the new Swedish Fireknife is a very well-designed and comfortable knife, so much so that mine is now a permanent addition to my knockaround/training bag. It's light, ergonomic, razor-sharp and the blade design lends itself well to a variety of tasks. The question is, who wouldn’t want to win one?

All you have to do is continue sending in your training tips to fsgundogtips@gmail.com for the chance to win. I've got several of these knives to give away, so the more tips you send the more chances you have to win one. Your tip can be about any aspect of training, ownership or hunting with your dogs. It can be a useful piece of gear (homemade or otherwise), a time-saving piece of advice or a novel or unusual way to teach a concept.

Our first winner, Bill Maggart, gave us a cool tip to help introduce a pup to water. I thought using Cheetos to lure a pup into the water was a pretty creative way to overcome an issue many puppy owners struggle with, and this week's winner from reader Lee Nelson is similar in that it uses a treat in an unorthodox way to help us out with a task that is sometimes difficult with an active dog: trimming toenails.

Ever have a dog that fights you non-stop while trying to do his periodic claw trimming? Maybe a bad past experience or one of those who just can't sit still. Rather than fighting with him, found the key is total distraction. What dog doesn't love a good treat? I'll take a slice of very fresh white bread. You know the kind. The type you can wad up into a tight dough ball. Slather it up with peanut butter. Open the dog's mouth. Stick the slice up in the roof of his mouth, peanut butter side up. He'll be so busy trying to get it down with his tongue, he won't care what you're doing! The only challenge to this technique is to stop laughing long enough to get the deed done! Enjoy!

Interesting. I'm lucky in that all of my dogs are used to me trimming their toes, but some dogs can get happy feet when you're trying to trim, and it's no fun when you accidentally cut into your dog's quick because they're bouncing around so much. Curious, I decided to try this tip out on my pup this morning, and I gotta say, it worked like a charm.

Now, I know some of you expressed concern with the last tip about giving a dog human food. Personally, I think that as long as you're not feeding your dog table scraps every day and buying them candy bars, chips and beer on a regular basis, occasionally giving them a treat like Cheetos or a bit of peanut butter isn't the end of the world. I can certainly think of worse things for a dog to endure.

Congratulations to Lee Nelson (Lee, I'll send you an e-mail shortly...) and remember, please keep those tips coming.

Comments (8)

Top Rated
All Comments
from RockySquirrel wrote 1 year 49 weeks ago

Here is my tip:

A chiwawa makes a lousy dog for chasing mountain lions. It isn't too great in a duck blind either. Now where do I get my new knife?

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from slothman wrote 1 year 49 weeks ago

Blood trailing tip:
Beg or bribe all your pals who don't enjoy eating fresh venison liver (we all know some one who doesn't) to save you their livers. Slice liver into convenient portions and store in your deep freezer. Begin feeding dogs tidbits of liver as treats for a few weeks, then use liver as the reward on the end of your training blood lines. Never met a pup who wasn't absolutely in love with the stuff!

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Ontario Honker ... wrote 1 year 49 weeks ago

Here's a tip that probably won't win any prizes but it's well worth it so I'll pass it along here. Most guys are pretty finicky about training their dogs with dummies or wings as per the "written word" in the professional dog training manuals. I heartily recommend that anyone training a retriever pup also work with them using their hunting cap. Flapping that thing around in the air really simulates a bird in flight and I'm telling you it will drive any puppy nuts! Without thinking they'll go pick it up and bring it back for more. Then you can move on to training dummies etc. But don't stop with the cap! Keep playing with it from time to time. Here's why. If you hunt the windy country like I do, it's great to have your dog ready to charge after your cap whenever it gets blown away by a sudden gust. I have told the story a few times on here about my lab Ethyl grabbing my Resistol cowboy hat on the first bounce when it blew off while I was riding at the top of a divide in the Bob Marshall Wilderness many years ago. In another second that hat would have been lost forever. Ethyl went right up on the side of my horse to put that fedora back in hand. A great dog! And a pretty damn good horse too.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from rolesville rocker wrote 1 year 49 weeks ago

Chad, Really enjoy the blog and input from other dog people.

My suggestion is not about training but is definitely dog related. Most of us bleach for cleaning the kennels. But I really hate that most of my pants are getting bleach legs. So, what I do now is, open the gallon jug, remove the foil seal, reclose the jug and then turn it over. Take you pocket knife or other sharp object and punch 6-8 small holes in the bottom. Now go to the kennel, turn the jug over and hold it close to the kennel floor. slowly open the top enough to allow the bleach to flow in small streams out of the holes. You can carefully distribute the bleach, close off the jug, then step back with your hose and disinfect. Hope this helps your readers and maybe earn me a knife.
Thanks.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from redfishunter wrote 1 year 49 weeks ago

Funny you should say that Honker. My hunting buddy does the same thing. The dog loves it so much that after a good retrieve she gets to fetch the hat as a reward. Only problem is when the birds aren't flying that dog starts to whine and beg for his hat.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Knife Freak wrote 1 year 49 weeks ago

This is something my Grandpa did and I do know. I have know scientific proof or reason but he alwaays got the runt of the litter and those were some of the best damn dogs I have ever seen. My best dods have always been runts. Andjust because they were born small doesnt mean they will stay small.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Ontario Honker ... wrote 1 year 49 weeks ago

On the subject of contests, was a winner ever named for the duck hunter in the tub caption?

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from uplandfanatic wrote 1 year 48 weeks ago

With the weather getting warmer and upland season getting closer, alot of us our taking our best friends out for refresher courses. With that comes the chance of encounters with rattlesnakes! I know a handful of people who have lost dogs to rattlesnake bites. That being said my tip is to be proactive against snakebites. First thing I do when I get a new pup is to kill a rattlesnake and lay it in the grass and show it to them. Then I use an e-caller and any time they go near it (being curious) I hit them with the caller and use the heel command. I dont let off the caller until they are next to me in the heel command. As a backup I also get the shot for my dogs its given yearly from any vet.

0 Good Comment? | | Report

Post a Comment

from slothman wrote 1 year 49 weeks ago

Blood trailing tip:
Beg or bribe all your pals who don't enjoy eating fresh venison liver (we all know some one who doesn't) to save you their livers. Slice liver into convenient portions and store in your deep freezer. Begin feeding dogs tidbits of liver as treats for a few weeks, then use liver as the reward on the end of your training blood lines. Never met a pup who wasn't absolutely in love with the stuff!

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from RockySquirrel wrote 1 year 49 weeks ago

Here is my tip:

A chiwawa makes a lousy dog for chasing mountain lions. It isn't too great in a duck blind either. Now where do I get my new knife?

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Ontario Honker ... wrote 1 year 49 weeks ago

Here's a tip that probably won't win any prizes but it's well worth it so I'll pass it along here. Most guys are pretty finicky about training their dogs with dummies or wings as per the "written word" in the professional dog training manuals. I heartily recommend that anyone training a retriever pup also work with them using their hunting cap. Flapping that thing around in the air really simulates a bird in flight and I'm telling you it will drive any puppy nuts! Without thinking they'll go pick it up and bring it back for more. Then you can move on to training dummies etc. But don't stop with the cap! Keep playing with it from time to time. Here's why. If you hunt the windy country like I do, it's great to have your dog ready to charge after your cap whenever it gets blown away by a sudden gust. I have told the story a few times on here about my lab Ethyl grabbing my Resistol cowboy hat on the first bounce when it blew off while I was riding at the top of a divide in the Bob Marshall Wilderness many years ago. In another second that hat would have been lost forever. Ethyl went right up on the side of my horse to put that fedora back in hand. A great dog! And a pretty damn good horse too.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from rolesville rocker wrote 1 year 49 weeks ago

Chad, Really enjoy the blog and input from other dog people.

My suggestion is not about training but is definitely dog related. Most of us bleach for cleaning the kennels. But I really hate that most of my pants are getting bleach legs. So, what I do now is, open the gallon jug, remove the foil seal, reclose the jug and then turn it over. Take you pocket knife or other sharp object and punch 6-8 small holes in the bottom. Now go to the kennel, turn the jug over and hold it close to the kennel floor. slowly open the top enough to allow the bleach to flow in small streams out of the holes. You can carefully distribute the bleach, close off the jug, then step back with your hose and disinfect. Hope this helps your readers and maybe earn me a knife.
Thanks.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from redfishunter wrote 1 year 49 weeks ago

Funny you should say that Honker. My hunting buddy does the same thing. The dog loves it so much that after a good retrieve she gets to fetch the hat as a reward. Only problem is when the birds aren't flying that dog starts to whine and beg for his hat.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Knife Freak wrote 1 year 49 weeks ago

This is something my Grandpa did and I do know. I have know scientific proof or reason but he alwaays got the runt of the litter and those were some of the best damn dogs I have ever seen. My best dods have always been runts. Andjust because they were born small doesnt mean they will stay small.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Ontario Honker ... wrote 1 year 49 weeks ago

On the subject of contests, was a winner ever named for the duck hunter in the tub caption?

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from uplandfanatic wrote 1 year 48 weeks ago

With the weather getting warmer and upland season getting closer, alot of us our taking our best friends out for refresher courses. With that comes the chance of encounters with rattlesnakes! I know a handful of people who have lost dogs to rattlesnake bites. That being said my tip is to be proactive against snakebites. First thing I do when I get a new pup is to kill a rattlesnake and lay it in the grass and show it to them. Then I use an e-caller and any time they go near it (being curious) I hit them with the caller and use the heel command. I dont let off the caller until they are next to me in the heel command. As a backup I also get the shot for my dogs its given yearly from any vet.

0 Good Comment? | | Report

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