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SHOT Show 2011: Melvin Forbes and the Evolution of Hunting Rifles

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January 24, 2011

SHOT Show 2011: Melvin Forbes and the Evolution of Hunting Rifles

By David E. Petzal


About the Video
: Melvin Forbes, along with Kenny Jarrett, revolutionized sporting-rifle design in the 1980s. Melvin made them lighter than anyone every had; Kenny, more accurate.

http://ak.c.ooyala.com/5ydHEwYzrh3AUUOdxB4VP60FnoG7h9Y3/3Gduepif0T1UGY8H4xMDoxOjBrO-I4W8

Comments (8)

Top Rated
All Comments
from Sarge01 wrote 3 years 12 weeks ago

Melvin is a good friend of mine and lives not too far from me and has a hunting camp right next to mine. Melvin is a super guy besides being a super rifle builder. I'm proud to call him a fellow West Virginian. My all time favorite is the 5 pound 4 ounce .280 on a 700 action. He has one of those at every show and when he sees me coming he yells and says that he has my rifle.

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from Jim in Mo wrote 3 years 12 weeks ago

I'm so glad Mr. Forbes confirmed my thoughts that he must be reducing stock weight, a barreled action can only take so much. Still, it's amazing what he can do.
With Mr. Forbes' light-weight rifles that guy who sent back a .416 for repairing must be recoil intolerant extraordinaire!

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from ishawooa wrote 3 years 12 weeks ago

I have always admired Melvin's rifles and it is too bad that the Colt deal did not work out. It would have made Forbes-like rifles more affordable to the masses. Insofar as Kenny's rifles there certainly is nothing wrong with them. However I knew gunsmiths in other parts of the south that produced rifles of equal accuracy back in the seventies on a low scale but never bothered for notarity. In fact the few that my buddies and I managed to purchase, we called "beanfield rifles" simply because we hunted over soybean fields with them. Sometime later the name was applyed to many long range rifles. My first was a .300 Win Mag that shot very tight groups to 500 yards. I never knew beyond that because I didn't have a longer place to shoot at the time.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from focusfront wrote 3 years 12 weeks ago

Has Forbes every experimented with a takedown rifle? If if fit in a small square case, one of his 4 1/2 pound model 20s in .260 or 7mm-08 would be the world's best travel rifle for anything smaller than a Siberian tiger. That covers a lot of ground.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from focusfront wrote 3 years 12 weeks ago

Correction: anything smaller than a lion. Lost my mind for a second there.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Carney wrote 3 years 12 weeks ago

I dunno. Maybe somebody somewhere needs a Siberian Tiger shot. Just sayin'.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from MJC wrote 3 years 12 weeks ago

May have to set up a long term savings account for one of these rifles...

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from 99explorer wrote 3 years 12 weeks ago

Carney,
A few years ago, a veterinarian in Texas staged a canned hunt for a Siberian tiger. He videotaped the shoot for the client, and the tape was shown on TV along with the news story about his $40,000 fine.
Apparently, someone didn't think the tiger needed to be shot.

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from focusfront wrote 3 years 12 weeks ago

Has Forbes every experimented with a takedown rifle? If if fit in a small square case, one of his 4 1/2 pound model 20s in .260 or 7mm-08 would be the world's best travel rifle for anything smaller than a Siberian tiger. That covers a lot of ground.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Sarge01 wrote 3 years 12 weeks ago

Melvin is a good friend of mine and lives not too far from me and has a hunting camp right next to mine. Melvin is a super guy besides being a super rifle builder. I'm proud to call him a fellow West Virginian. My all time favorite is the 5 pound 4 ounce .280 on a 700 action. He has one of those at every show and when he sees me coming he yells and says that he has my rifle.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Jim in Mo wrote 3 years 12 weeks ago

I'm so glad Mr. Forbes confirmed my thoughts that he must be reducing stock weight, a barreled action can only take so much. Still, it's amazing what he can do.
With Mr. Forbes' light-weight rifles that guy who sent back a .416 for repairing must be recoil intolerant extraordinaire!

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from ishawooa wrote 3 years 12 weeks ago

I have always admired Melvin's rifles and it is too bad that the Colt deal did not work out. It would have made Forbes-like rifles more affordable to the masses. Insofar as Kenny's rifles there certainly is nothing wrong with them. However I knew gunsmiths in other parts of the south that produced rifles of equal accuracy back in the seventies on a low scale but never bothered for notarity. In fact the few that my buddies and I managed to purchase, we called "beanfield rifles" simply because we hunted over soybean fields with them. Sometime later the name was applyed to many long range rifles. My first was a .300 Win Mag that shot very tight groups to 500 yards. I never knew beyond that because I didn't have a longer place to shoot at the time.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from focusfront wrote 3 years 12 weeks ago

Correction: anything smaller than a lion. Lost my mind for a second there.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Carney wrote 3 years 12 weeks ago

I dunno. Maybe somebody somewhere needs a Siberian Tiger shot. Just sayin'.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from MJC wrote 3 years 12 weeks ago

May have to set up a long term savings account for one of these rifles...

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from 99explorer wrote 3 years 12 weeks ago

Carney,
A few years ago, a veterinarian in Texas staged a canned hunt for a Siberian tiger. He videotaped the shoot for the client, and the tape was shown on TV along with the news story about his $40,000 fine.
Apparently, someone didn't think the tiger needed to be shot.

0 Good Comment? | | Report

Post a Comment

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