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Gear Review: Simms Guide Boot w/ StreamTread Sole

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February 18, 2009

Gear Review: Simms Guide Boot w/ StreamTread Sole

By Kirk Deeter

Photo by Kirk Deeter

Like many anglers, I've depended on a good pair of felt-soled boots to keep me upright in the river for many years.  But the dirty truth of the matter is that felt is now clearly linked to spreading a number of fish-killing threats like didymo (rock snot), mud snails, and whirling disease.  If you have a conscience, you want to avoid felt at any cost.  But, until now, if you didn't want to fall on your butt, you didn't have many great options, Aquastealth soles not withstanding.

I'll admit I was a bit skeptical about these new rubber-soled boots, even if they are made by Simms, which I have always considered a solid company, and they utilize a sole from Vibram, a company with a 70-year track record of making boot bottoms.  Only when I heard from two other boot testers, and got to spend some time in the river myself recently in these boots was I sold, or "soled," as it were.

I'd rate the grip factor at 90 percent the performance of felt, or better.  Granted, I'll want to see how they behave when the rivers get weedy in the summer, but for stability and lateral grab on the river bottom, they seemed to hold their own (and, thankfully, me).  I'm impressed by their apparent durability... as someone who hikes into many rivers, often in my wading boots, I'll be interested to see how they hold up in this regard.  But in terms of comfort and support, they earn an A.

The price tag isn't cheap... around $200 for a pair of guide boots... but neither is the construction.  In the end, it's a matter of putting your environmental conscience to test.  Because in the test between these rubber soles and felt, I'd say they come out pretty near even.

Deeter

Comments (28)

Top Rated
All Comments
from jamesti wrote 5 years 8 weeks ago

maybe if our great, fearless leader can get some jobs going we can all afford these boots. really, we can't afford not to have anything that will improve our lakes and streams the way things are going.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Sportsman Matt wrote 5 years 8 weeks ago

Cool boot tread, hopefully other manufacturers pick up on the idea.

I've only owned lug soled waders and boots, no felt, and found that the lugs give better traction in the mud and muck on the stream banks than felt ever could.

Let us know how you fare with the new boots.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Andrew Ferraro wrote 5 years 8 weeks ago

I think rubber works better in the mud and felt on the rocks. I guess it depends where you fish. I'm all rubber these days.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from fischer wrote 5 years 8 weeks ago

Long time reader, first time writer. To be honest I think it completely irresponsible of Simms to put the idea in peoples heads that using these boots will do anything to reduce the spread on aquatic hitchhikers, especially didymo (which is a microscopic spore that can become lodged anywhere on a boot, laces, threads, etc). Whirling disease is also a microscopic parasite that can attach to anything. Instead of making a marketing push out of this to sell more boots maybe Simms should be spending some of those marketing dollars on making people aware that the only way to completely eliminate the threat of river nasties is to properly clean your equipment! Please don't get me wrong, Simms makes a great product and I own plenty of it myself, but Deeter on a public forum like this where people go for information, you need to make it clear that proper cleaning is the only way to gurantee we stop spreading the funk.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from kirkdeeter wrote 5 years 8 weeks ago

Fischer... you raise a really, really good point in that cleaning your boots (mix Formula 409 with water, for example) is extremely important. That said, I don't know what you're smokin' to imply "irresponsibility" on Simms' behalf, having moved away from the felt sole, like it's a mere marketing ploy. Let's be completely candid here... New Zealand banned felt; Utah has mandated that all its conservation staff wear non-felt boots; Trout Unlimited has asked for mfrs. to drop all felt by 2011 (Simms will do it in 2010)... the science goes on, and on, and on, relative the downside of felt v. rubber soles... and if you're banking on people dipping, or freezing, or scrubbing their felt boots as an equal countermeasure against spreading the "funk," as is wearing rubber (and dipping, freezing and scrubbing rubber boots)... it just isn't.

Trust me, I've never been afraid to criticize a company for making crappy product, and the only thing that burns me more is when a company pins crappy product to a cause. This isn't an example of that. You'll know when I find one.

Clean boots, yes. Rubber over felt, should be a big yes. I hope we're on the same page.

+6 Good Comment? | | Report
from rob wrote 5 years 8 weeks ago

I can't agree more with Fischer. What about the fiber in your waders? The fabric in the boots? Tires on boat trailers? Boat trailers? The existing snails and snot in a system?
From what I've been told from fisheries biologists, if they look hard enough in a system, they will find whirling disease. That's in Montana mind you.
That being said, any step taken to eliminate a problem is a good step. As soon as my $200 wading boot stimulus check rolls in, I'll get a pair.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from bishfish wrote 5 years 8 weeks ago

I have been wearing these Simms boots here in New Zealand for the past 2 months. I agree with the reviewer - on weed or slime free rocks the sole provides about 85 to 90% of the grip of felts. But here it is Summer and many of the rocks are weed or slime covered. I guess I would put the rubber sole in these conditions at about 70% of felts.
I strongly reccommend using a wading staff if you are wading in over mid-thigh water, or water moving very swiftly with weed or slime on rocks.
Very much on the up-side, these boots are wonderfully comfortable to wear, especially when tramping longish distances, or transversing boulder covered banks. They are great on muddy, slippery banks too.

+4 Good Comment? | | Report
from tudave wrote 5 years 8 weeks ago

I worked on developing the Trout Unlimited policy recommending the elimination felt soles by 2011. It is true that felts are not the only piece of angling equipment that could transport AIS, but felt soles have been identified in several studies as the most likely candidate for transporting aquatic invasive species. In a study done at Montana State University, it was found that the average angler transports 22.10 grams of sediment on their wading boots. Riding along in this 22.10 grams is such stuff as whirling disease spores, NZ mud snails, Didymo, and various other critters, plants, and pathogens. The elimination of felt will not eliminate the risk of spreading aquatic invasive species, but this action will help reduce the risk, and risk reduction is what this is all about. The other part of this effort involves the cleaning of gear. The recommendaitons found in the Clean Angling Pledge at www.tu.org or www.cleanangling.org to inspect, clean, and dry gear will also help in this regard.

+5 Good Comment? | | Report
from kirkdeeter wrote 5 years 8 weeks ago

Thanks bishfish... that's what I'm wondering, as it's your summer, our winter.

Anything happening on the mouse down there?

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Alex Pernice th... wrote 5 years 8 weeks ago

Heck, I can barly afford 100 dollar waiders, (Don't need felt here.) 200 dollars for just the boots? Insanity... Deeter, talk someone into doing a waider testing thing in the next F&S, and tell 'em I'm in.

Alex Pernice (Now signed AP, sick of typing my name over and over)

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from buckhunter wrote 5 years 8 weeks ago

The attached link is Simms own description of the wading boot with streamtread.

http://www.simmsfishing.com/site/headwaters_wading_boot_aquasteath_.html...

Neither Deeter or Simms say that the boot is a cure all but only a measure of protection from transported disease.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Ziggy4334 wrote 5 years 8 weeks ago

These boots will help people who golf wade and fish as others have for years. Who would have thought - wading boots that simulate the tread style of golfing cleats that have been retooled and reworked for years?

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from dwaynez wrote 5 years 8 weeks ago

Those boots look like they are the real deal and they would be great for several different applications. The only thing that would scare me away at this time would be the price, I am all for saving the environment and preventing the transport of aquatic pests, but at that price I would not be able to afford them right now.

I always enjoy the gear reviews though, keeps me updated on the latest and greatest, also gives me something to add to my wish list for later in the year.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from bishfish wrote 5 years 8 weeks ago

g'day kirk,
"Thanks bishfish... that's what I'm wondering, as it's your summer, our winter.Anything happening on the mouse down there?"

Well actually I just spent a week in the Central North Island of NZ. One night we had a unbelieveable downpour which raised the river level of the Tauranga-Taupo river I was fishing by 5 to 6 feet. It dropped back to about 2 to 3 feet above normal next day but still pretty dirty. I did my trick of wandering along the banks guiding a big black wolly bugger into every little backwater that might shelter a fish. Great sport. But I also had a couple of mice flies about my person, as you do. But they did not last long, big fish grabbed them, got into the flood current and it was goodnight nurse. Without wishing to spam, there is a little bit about this on my blog at http://www.bishfish.co.nz/bishonfish.html scroll down to "muddy waters".

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from ejunk wrote 5 years 8 weeks ago

Top of my wish list is a new pair of wading boots. I'm definitely switching to sticky rubber soles. I, for one, would love to see reviews of as many of these boots as possible, either on this blog or in the pages of F&S. Things are changing for us wading anglers! Help us make the transition without wasting a bunch of hard earned cash!

yrs-
Evan!

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from kirkdeeter wrote 5 years 8 weeks ago

Good on ya, bish... sweet blog.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from kirkdeeter wrote 5 years 8 weeks ago

By the way, can I steal "goodnight nurse" for a story someday?

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from bishfish wrote 5 years 8 weeks ago

G'day Kirk, again,

"By the way, can I steal "goodnight nurse" for a story someday?"

Go for it - I did :) Actually it is a pretty common expression down here for 'its all over' .

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Wags wrote 5 years 8 weeks ago

So much to say, so little time...but here goes:
Kirk, thanks for the review I have been waiting on for about 5 months now. Someone I trust who has actually worn them in a real fishing situation. I talked to a Simms dealer at a fly show recently, but I don't really see that as an "unbiased" opinion. I think the idea is good, it is interesting to me that AquaStealth has been around for years but never REALLY took off. My problem is this: it shouldn't cost so much extra for me to do the right thing. I want to, I understand the science, but man, this ain't the time to be frivolous with the cash. There was no way to put together a simple boot with technology that was comparable to a standard felt boot? I do understand the need to recoup some R&D, and I am sure Vibram isn't giving away the material, but come on. It feels like someone is trying to make a buck off of the next "crisis". Oddly enough, similar opinion I have of Timmy's post on Global Climate Change. Take something that has genuine validity, stir in some hype, create an industry based on it.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Wags wrote 5 years 8 weeks ago

I meant to say in the middle "Isn't there someway to put together a simple boot with this technology that is comparable in price to a standard felt boot.

Sorry, I up to it in alligators and edit time is limited.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from megakarl99 wrote 5 years 8 weeks ago

In response to this being a "marketing ploy," I would beg to differ. While it's true that properly cleaning your gear is the only means of preventing the spread of riverborne pathogens and is equally important regardless of the sole, the issue with felt is the difficulty of effectively cleaning it. It is quite literally a giant sponge on the bottom of your foot. Studies have shown that even soaking a felt soled boot in bleach for an hour (something that will drastically compromise the life span of the boot by the way) still may not remove all waterborne pathogens. Rubber soles are much easier to clean, which is why there is such a big push for manufacturers and fishermen alike. If you choose to use felt soles, that is fine as long as you are responsible enough to clean them extremely thoroughly. For my money, I'd rather have a reliable pair of rubber soled wading boots that I don't have to spend 2 hours cleaning to remove whatever creepy crawlies have made their way into the felt. Not to mention the money I'll save not having to buy new boots every season because the cleaning ritual has destroyed my felt soles.

Spend the money right, and you'll only have to spend it once.

Bravo to Simms for leading the way!

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from PZabel wrote 5 years 8 weeks ago

I think they will last longer than a felt bottom so in the long run these boots may be less expensive. I'll try them out in our secret spots that are hike in and let you know how they hold up!

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from MLH wrote 4 years 42 weeks ago

Okay. You convinced me ... just ordered an new pair of Simms Freestone Vibram soles from Bass Pro. With $20 promo, they are $109.99 plus tax and shipping.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from NAMXAD1 wrote 4 years 31 weeks ago

Look it all comes down to this, we are going in to their home so we need to keep it as clean as possible, same as you would expect from a guest coming into your home. So if it cost a little extra so that you kids may have a place to fish so be it, quit crying and do what is right. Go the extra mile and get the good stuff for the water, and yes clean your gear properly... besides you know that anything new is going to cost a lot in the begining.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from rdorman wrote 4 years 14 weeks ago

i'm a little late here, but how is studded rubber?

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from rdorman wrote 4 years 14 weeks ago

as is these soles with screw in studs?

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from mrjalbert wrote 3 years 26 weeks ago

I've got a new pair of G4s with a few days of testing behind me. I fished with these for a few days on the Frying Pan and Roaring Fork rivers in the Aspen Valley. On the Pan, a tailwater with a somewhat rough textured riverbed, these performed pretty close to the same as felt, and I never felt out of control. Two big thumbs up. However, moving over to the Roaring Fork, which is a freestone river with smooth, snotty rocks, the boots were seriously dangerous. I felt out of control all day on this river - I was slipping on nearly every step. Granted, even felt soled boots are challenged by the nature of this particular riverbed, but there is NO WAY that this vibram sole performed as well as felt. I'll be screwing on a set of star studs before I try it again. I'd also like to mention that the quality of construction is amazing - I've had had anything so sturdy and stable.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Joseph William wrote 1 year 8 weeks ago

I had a pair of these for about 3 years. Completely demolished. Seams fell apart, holes in the leather, and soles worn through. I want to say that I fish pretty hard and this is the main reason for the boots' destruction but I'm not sure. I don't think that I fish harder in these boots than a guide getting paid to do the same. They are made overseas, as are all others, but leather products- especially boots- ultimately become junk. I understand that there are certain things to do to take good "care" of the Guide Boot but I also feel that the design of the boot should take into consideration that these boots are made to be worn in water and then dried 1,000 times in the lifetime of the boot. Water and leather don't mix in such extreme conditions. I roughed it last season with pebbles in my boots and poor support because I felt I had to justify the money I spent on these boots. Going synthetic with Korkers KGB.

0 Good Comment? | | Report

Post a Comment

from kirkdeeter wrote 5 years 8 weeks ago

Fischer... you raise a really, really good point in that cleaning your boots (mix Formula 409 with water, for example) is extremely important. That said, I don't know what you're smokin' to imply "irresponsibility" on Simms' behalf, having moved away from the felt sole, like it's a mere marketing ploy. Let's be completely candid here... New Zealand banned felt; Utah has mandated that all its conservation staff wear non-felt boots; Trout Unlimited has asked for mfrs. to drop all felt by 2011 (Simms will do it in 2010)... the science goes on, and on, and on, relative the downside of felt v. rubber soles... and if you're banking on people dipping, or freezing, or scrubbing their felt boots as an equal countermeasure against spreading the "funk," as is wearing rubber (and dipping, freezing and scrubbing rubber boots)... it just isn't.

Trust me, I've never been afraid to criticize a company for making crappy product, and the only thing that burns me more is when a company pins crappy product to a cause. This isn't an example of that. You'll know when I find one.

Clean boots, yes. Rubber over felt, should be a big yes. I hope we're on the same page.

+6 Good Comment? | | Report
from tudave wrote 5 years 8 weeks ago

I worked on developing the Trout Unlimited policy recommending the elimination felt soles by 2011. It is true that felts are not the only piece of angling equipment that could transport AIS, but felt soles have been identified in several studies as the most likely candidate for transporting aquatic invasive species. In a study done at Montana State University, it was found that the average angler transports 22.10 grams of sediment on their wading boots. Riding along in this 22.10 grams is such stuff as whirling disease spores, NZ mud snails, Didymo, and various other critters, plants, and pathogens. The elimination of felt will not eliminate the risk of spreading aquatic invasive species, but this action will help reduce the risk, and risk reduction is what this is all about. The other part of this effort involves the cleaning of gear. The recommendaitons found in the Clean Angling Pledge at www.tu.org or www.cleanangling.org to inspect, clean, and dry gear will also help in this regard.

+5 Good Comment? | | Report
from bishfish wrote 5 years 8 weeks ago

I have been wearing these Simms boots here in New Zealand for the past 2 months. I agree with the reviewer - on weed or slime free rocks the sole provides about 85 to 90% of the grip of felts. But here it is Summer and many of the rocks are weed or slime covered. I guess I would put the rubber sole in these conditions at about 70% of felts.
I strongly reccommend using a wading staff if you are wading in over mid-thigh water, or water moving very swiftly with weed or slime on rocks.
Very much on the up-side, these boots are wonderfully comfortable to wear, especially when tramping longish distances, or transversing boulder covered banks. They are great on muddy, slippery banks too.

+4 Good Comment? | | Report
from Alex Pernice th... wrote 5 years 8 weeks ago

Heck, I can barly afford 100 dollar waiders, (Don't need felt here.) 200 dollars for just the boots? Insanity... Deeter, talk someone into doing a waider testing thing in the next F&S, and tell 'em I'm in.

Alex Pernice (Now signed AP, sick of typing my name over and over)

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Ziggy4334 wrote 5 years 8 weeks ago

These boots will help people who golf wade and fish as others have for years. Who would have thought - wading boots that simulate the tread style of golfing cleats that have been retooled and reworked for years?

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from megakarl99 wrote 5 years 8 weeks ago

In response to this being a "marketing ploy," I would beg to differ. While it's true that properly cleaning your gear is the only means of preventing the spread of riverborne pathogens and is equally important regardless of the sole, the issue with felt is the difficulty of effectively cleaning it. It is quite literally a giant sponge on the bottom of your foot. Studies have shown that even soaking a felt soled boot in bleach for an hour (something that will drastically compromise the life span of the boot by the way) still may not remove all waterborne pathogens. Rubber soles are much easier to clean, which is why there is such a big push for manufacturers and fishermen alike. If you choose to use felt soles, that is fine as long as you are responsible enough to clean them extremely thoroughly. For my money, I'd rather have a reliable pair of rubber soled wading boots that I don't have to spend 2 hours cleaning to remove whatever creepy crawlies have made their way into the felt. Not to mention the money I'll save not having to buy new boots every season because the cleaning ritual has destroyed my felt soles.

Spend the money right, and you'll only have to spend it once.

Bravo to Simms for leading the way!

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Sportsman Matt wrote 5 years 8 weeks ago

Cool boot tread, hopefully other manufacturers pick up on the idea.

I've only owned lug soled waders and boots, no felt, and found that the lugs give better traction in the mud and muck on the stream banks than felt ever could.

Let us know how you fare with the new boots.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Andrew Ferraro wrote 5 years 8 weeks ago

I think rubber works better in the mud and felt on the rocks. I guess it depends where you fish. I'm all rubber these days.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from fischer wrote 5 years 8 weeks ago

Long time reader, first time writer. To be honest I think it completely irresponsible of Simms to put the idea in peoples heads that using these boots will do anything to reduce the spread on aquatic hitchhikers, especially didymo (which is a microscopic spore that can become lodged anywhere on a boot, laces, threads, etc). Whirling disease is also a microscopic parasite that can attach to anything. Instead of making a marketing push out of this to sell more boots maybe Simms should be spending some of those marketing dollars on making people aware that the only way to completely eliminate the threat of river nasties is to properly clean your equipment! Please don't get me wrong, Simms makes a great product and I own plenty of it myself, but Deeter on a public forum like this where people go for information, you need to make it clear that proper cleaning is the only way to gurantee we stop spreading the funk.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from rob wrote 5 years 8 weeks ago

I can't agree more with Fischer. What about the fiber in your waders? The fabric in the boots? Tires on boat trailers? Boat trailers? The existing snails and snot in a system?
From what I've been told from fisheries biologists, if they look hard enough in a system, they will find whirling disease. That's in Montana mind you.
That being said, any step taken to eliminate a problem is a good step. As soon as my $200 wading boot stimulus check rolls in, I'll get a pair.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from kirkdeeter wrote 5 years 8 weeks ago

Thanks bishfish... that's what I'm wondering, as it's your summer, our winter.

Anything happening on the mouse down there?

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from buckhunter wrote 5 years 8 weeks ago

The attached link is Simms own description of the wading boot with streamtread.

http://www.simmsfishing.com/site/headwaters_wading_boot_aquasteath_.html...

Neither Deeter or Simms say that the boot is a cure all but only a measure of protection from transported disease.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from dwaynez wrote 5 years 8 weeks ago

Those boots look like they are the real deal and they would be great for several different applications. The only thing that would scare me away at this time would be the price, I am all for saving the environment and preventing the transport of aquatic pests, but at that price I would not be able to afford them right now.

I always enjoy the gear reviews though, keeps me updated on the latest and greatest, also gives me something to add to my wish list for later in the year.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from bishfish wrote 5 years 8 weeks ago

g'day kirk,
"Thanks bishfish... that's what I'm wondering, as it's your summer, our winter.Anything happening on the mouse down there?"

Well actually I just spent a week in the Central North Island of NZ. One night we had a unbelieveable downpour which raised the river level of the Tauranga-Taupo river I was fishing by 5 to 6 feet. It dropped back to about 2 to 3 feet above normal next day but still pretty dirty. I did my trick of wandering along the banks guiding a big black wolly bugger into every little backwater that might shelter a fish. Great sport. But I also had a couple of mice flies about my person, as you do. But they did not last long, big fish grabbed them, got into the flood current and it was goodnight nurse. Without wishing to spam, there is a little bit about this on my blog at http://www.bishfish.co.nz/bishonfish.html scroll down to "muddy waters".

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from ejunk wrote 5 years 8 weeks ago

Top of my wish list is a new pair of wading boots. I'm definitely switching to sticky rubber soles. I, for one, would love to see reviews of as many of these boots as possible, either on this blog or in the pages of F&S. Things are changing for us wading anglers! Help us make the transition without wasting a bunch of hard earned cash!

yrs-
Evan!

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from kirkdeeter wrote 5 years 8 weeks ago

Good on ya, bish... sweet blog.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from kirkdeeter wrote 5 years 8 weeks ago

By the way, can I steal "goodnight nurse" for a story someday?

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from bishfish wrote 5 years 8 weeks ago

G'day Kirk, again,

"By the way, can I steal "goodnight nurse" for a story someday?"

Go for it - I did :) Actually it is a pretty common expression down here for 'its all over' .

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Wags wrote 5 years 8 weeks ago

So much to say, so little time...but here goes:
Kirk, thanks for the review I have been waiting on for about 5 months now. Someone I trust who has actually worn them in a real fishing situation. I talked to a Simms dealer at a fly show recently, but I don't really see that as an "unbiased" opinion. I think the idea is good, it is interesting to me that AquaStealth has been around for years but never REALLY took off. My problem is this: it shouldn't cost so much extra for me to do the right thing. I want to, I understand the science, but man, this ain't the time to be frivolous with the cash. There was no way to put together a simple boot with technology that was comparable to a standard felt boot? I do understand the need to recoup some R&D, and I am sure Vibram isn't giving away the material, but come on. It feels like someone is trying to make a buck off of the next "crisis". Oddly enough, similar opinion I have of Timmy's post on Global Climate Change. Take something that has genuine validity, stir in some hype, create an industry based on it.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Wags wrote 5 years 8 weeks ago

I meant to say in the middle "Isn't there someway to put together a simple boot with this technology that is comparable in price to a standard felt boot.

Sorry, I up to it in alligators and edit time is limited.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from PZabel wrote 5 years 8 weeks ago

I think they will last longer than a felt bottom so in the long run these boots may be less expensive. I'll try them out in our secret spots that are hike in and let you know how they hold up!

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from MLH wrote 4 years 42 weeks ago

Okay. You convinced me ... just ordered an new pair of Simms Freestone Vibram soles from Bass Pro. With $20 promo, they are $109.99 plus tax and shipping.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from NAMXAD1 wrote 4 years 31 weeks ago

Look it all comes down to this, we are going in to their home so we need to keep it as clean as possible, same as you would expect from a guest coming into your home. So if it cost a little extra so that you kids may have a place to fish so be it, quit crying and do what is right. Go the extra mile and get the good stuff for the water, and yes clean your gear properly... besides you know that anything new is going to cost a lot in the begining.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from rdorman wrote 4 years 14 weeks ago

i'm a little late here, but how is studded rubber?

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from rdorman wrote 4 years 14 weeks ago

as is these soles with screw in studs?

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from jamesti wrote 5 years 8 weeks ago

maybe if our great, fearless leader can get some jobs going we can all afford these boots. really, we can't afford not to have anything that will improve our lakes and streams the way things are going.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from mrjalbert wrote 3 years 26 weeks ago

I've got a new pair of G4s with a few days of testing behind me. I fished with these for a few days on the Frying Pan and Roaring Fork rivers in the Aspen Valley. On the Pan, a tailwater with a somewhat rough textured riverbed, these performed pretty close to the same as felt, and I never felt out of control. Two big thumbs up. However, moving over to the Roaring Fork, which is a freestone river with smooth, snotty rocks, the boots were seriously dangerous. I felt out of control all day on this river - I was slipping on nearly every step. Granted, even felt soled boots are challenged by the nature of this particular riverbed, but there is NO WAY that this vibram sole performed as well as felt. I'll be screwing on a set of star studs before I try it again. I'd also like to mention that the quality of construction is amazing - I've had had anything so sturdy and stable.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Joseph William wrote 1 year 8 weeks ago

I had a pair of these for about 3 years. Completely demolished. Seams fell apart, holes in the leather, and soles worn through. I want to say that I fish pretty hard and this is the main reason for the boots' destruction but I'm not sure. I don't think that I fish harder in these boots than a guide getting paid to do the same. They are made overseas, as are all others, but leather products- especially boots- ultimately become junk. I understand that there are certain things to do to take good "care" of the Guide Boot but I also feel that the design of the boot should take into consideration that these boots are made to be worn in water and then dried 1,000 times in the lifetime of the boot. Water and leather don't mix in such extreme conditions. I roughed it last season with pebbles in my boots and poor support because I felt I had to justify the money I spent on these boots. Going synthetic with Korkers KGB.

0 Good Comment? | | Report

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