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Nose Jammer Put To The Test, Part I

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February 16, 2012

Nose Jammer Put To The Test, Part I

By Dave Hurteau

If you’ve been following along, you know that I’ve taken a few lighthearted pot shots at Nose Jammer, a spectacularly popular new vanillin-based “olfactory nerve overload system” in an aerosol spray. Well, I got a chance to test it last fall, and am finally getting around to reporting my findings.

For years, a contingent of deer hunters has trumpeted the efficacy of using vanilla extract as a cover scent. So except for making me hungry, I have no major problems with the fact that when you spray Nose Jammer in the woods, it smells like you've opened a box of vanilla cookies. What cracks me up, though, and what I’ve been specifically poking fun at, is the name of the product and the claim—written right on the can—that it “Jams Big Game Animal’s Ability to Smell.”

Maybe it’s just me, but I find it comically flabbergasting that a thing so almost certainly unproven and probably unprovable can be written right on the can. Right there. In bold. Which brings me to my test.
 
But let me first commend Nose Jammer’s maker, John Redmond (by all accounts a good guy and fine deer hunter), on this point: He obviously believes in his product. I can only assume that it was he who sent me (a proven cynic) an unmarked and unsolicited box containing two cans of Nose Jammer to try.

And I gave it a fair trial. The long and short of it is this: It seemed to confuse some deer—in some cases long enough to make them linger where they probably shouldn’t have, especially had I been using a gun instead of a bow. In other cases, the deer just bolted.
 
My initial two encounters reflect this. The first, at a casual walk, a small buck got straight downwind of my stand and got his nostrils full of the stuff at about 50 yards. His reaction was obvious; he stopped dead and sniffed the air for the longest time. He’d retreat and then come back to the spot to sniff some more. He eventually snorted and trotted off. About a half hour later, a doe and a fawn hit the Nose Jammer scent stream at about 70 yards. But that old nanny wasn’t fooled for a second. She instantly bounded off; blowing, with fawn in tow.

Now to me, those first two encounters alone should prove that Nose Jammer does not jam a deer’s ability to smell. So why say that it does? It may indeed be a comparatively effective cover scent. So why not say “The Most Effective Cover Scent You Can Buy”? That, too, might be impossible to prove. But unlike the current claim, it’s not so easy to disprove.

Comments (36)

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from bat man wrote 2 years 8 weeks ago

I like jammin, and have had great luck with it. Had a doe snort at me 3 times one night and watched her come into the food plot at the opposite end of the field. (there were other deer in the field.) Killed her at 25 yards 45 minutes later. Did something to her nose she did not like, but she is in the freezer now.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Oryx wrote 2 years 8 weeks ago

Up in my neck of the woods, we use "Toe Jammer."

The can looks about the same, but it's motto is a bit different:

"Jams Big Game Animal’s Ability to Smell (for weeks), propensity to eat, will to live, and general demeanor."

Powerful stuff.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from buckhunter wrote 2 years 8 weeks ago

If you step back and look at the market for whitetail hunting products, this stuff fits right in. Lots of companies making money selling hope, not good product.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from buckhunter wrote 2 years 8 weeks ago

I should add this is not exclusive to the hunting market. Golf manufacturers, diet companies, fishing manufacturers all sell hope. The hope that this one thing will make the difference. Sadly, many fall for these gimmicks.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from jcarlin wrote 2 years 8 weeks ago

I don't really believe in cover scents as such. However a friend of mine has had good success using Vanilla as a curiousity scent, which is what your observations seem to support.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from jcarlin wrote 2 years 8 weeks ago

In support of that last statement. I doubted my buddy and went out back one day and left a meandering trail of vanilla extract crossing the opening. Later in the day I watched a doe follow the line nose down. I'd say it works as a draw. Probably will until it becomes associated with hunters.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Walt Smith wrote 2 years 8 weeks ago

After reading your first article concerning Nose Jammer I tried some pure vanilla extract that I bought in mexico a few years ago-- the results were all deer that started to come towards my stand sniffed the air then turned and walked the other way. Needless to say my name won't be on the product endorsement list!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from NHshtr wrote 2 years 8 weeks ago

I've always been careful to keep my hunting clothes away from cooking odors (breakfast, dinner) when in camp.

But now, perhaps I'll bake a batch of vanilla cookies in them before I go out.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from steve182 wrote 2 years 8 weeks ago

As buckhunter said there are manufacturers in every market selling products that claim to do things they don't. Simply put, you can't buy success, in deer hunting, or in golf. I will admit after reading the first f&s piece on nosejammer i sprinkled a couple scent wicks with vanillin and used them on a few hunts. I did not see a deer i don't believe, but heard a few snorts.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Sarge01 wrote 2 years 8 weeks ago

steve182,
Reminds me of the last greatest club that I bought that insured me of making a birdy on every hole. Didn't quite work.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Kovar Judy wrote 2 years 8 weeks ago

I'm a "ground-pounder" of a bowhunter, won't find me in a treestand. Stalk & or ground/blind. I'm Native American and have long'd for a natural earth bound Mother Nature type product, not urine or gland type product. Nose Jammer along with a good suitable scent-lok scent elimation system and the use of Nose Jammer allowed me to take a buck in Dec. 2011. (And yes, the wind was blowing and hitting the back of my neck then toward the buck.)Slowly walking & waiting, walk & wait. This buck stood broadside and constantly nosed the wind. The buck allowed me to walk/stalk from 30 to 40 yds. to less than 15 yds. Now picture this, we are both standing out in the open of a picked bean field.The buck was trying to sort all this out when my arrow connected.
Never once did he stomp, flag or snort. Face to face as my ancestors once did & and yes Native American used scent control and earth bound cover-ups to mess up their animals minds. The whole story will be in BOWHUNTER MAGAZINE probably in the WHITETAIL Special. One must remember that your clothing, weapon and scent or lure or Nose Jammer is only as good as you the hunter makes it. But as I stand before you folks....Nose Jammer will always be in this Indians bowhunting plans.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Kovar Judy wrote 2 years 8 weeks ago

I'm a "ground-pounder" of a bowhunter, won't find me in a treestand. Stalk & or ground/blind. I'm Native American and have long'd for a natural earth bound Mother Nature type product, not urine or gland type product. Nose Jammer along with a good suitable scent-lok scent elimation system and the use of Nose Jammer allowed me to take a buck in Dec. 2011. (And yes, the wind was blowing and hitting the back of my neck then toward the buck.)Slowly walking & waiting, walk & wait. This buck stood broadside and constantly nosed the wind. The buck allowed me to walk/stalk from 30 to 40 yds. to less than 15 yds. Now picture this, we are both standing out in the open of a picked bean field.The buck was trying to sort all this out when my arrow connected.
Never once did he stomp, flag or snort. Face to face as my ancestors once did & and yes Native American used scent control and earth bound cover-ups to mess up their animals minds. The whole story will be in BOWHUNTER MAGAZINE probably in the WHITETAIL Special. One must remember that your clothing, weapon and scent or lure or Nose Jammer is only as good as you the hunter makes it. But as I stand before you folks....Nose Jammer will always be in this Indians bowhunting plans.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from ITHACASXS wrote 2 years 8 weeks ago

If plain old vanilla brings 'em in, just imagine what a few cannolis around your stand will do. Of course, I couldn't shoot a deer that was enjoying a cannoli, unless it was my cannoli.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from steve182 wrote 2 years 8 weeks ago

I believe a lot of products work because of the "placebo affect". If i try a new product and kill or see deer that hunt, it works. This is not always sound. But all that matters is if you think it's working,...it's working. Also good marketing will get mant to try at least once out of curiousity. I'm sure the profit margin on this stuff is high. I won't be buying any.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from steve182 wrote 2 years 8 weeks ago

Sarge, i had a good round this past week. Didn't make any birdies, but i had a lot of looks. Crazy,...decent golf at home in February. Passes the time till next hunting season.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from RS08 wrote 2 years 8 weeks ago

Dave,not just this is comically flabergasting. You didn't forget about that clothing line that advertised, " Forget the wind, just hunt" did you.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from dleurquin wrote 2 years 8 weeks ago

Well, if Nose Jammer doesn't work in the woods, at least it can be useful in the kitchen on the spice rack.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from buckhunter wrote 2 years 8 weeks ago

Kovar, May I recommend a book written by Saxton Pope, Hunting with the Bow and Arrow. Published 1923. True story of Ishi. You may find it very informative.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Dave Hurteau wrote 2 years 8 weeks ago

"...Nose Jammer is only as good as you the hunter makes it."

Don't mean to be a jerk, Kovar, but what in the world does that mean? It seems to me that Nose Jammer is designed to cover the butts of hunters who lack the skill to keep deer upwind. Other than the ability to read the directions on the can, what special skills are required of the hunter to use the stuff effectively?

Just asking....

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from labrador12 wrote 2 years 8 weeks ago

Do bears like vanilla? How about grizz. Sounds like a cheap way to bait?

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from murdock32 wrote 2 years 8 weeks ago

I think it all goes along the same line as smoking, I still do, and have had many a Deer stand and look at me, like they wanted to Bum a smoke. My brothers who quit many years back will stand close to the camp fire to help cover their scent, but think I stick of cigarette. Tell me if a animal knows the difference.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Kovar Judy wrote 2 years 8 weeks ago

Dave...."to cover the butts of hunters"...what I mean is that you the hunter can not use a product and still make
mistakes, big mistakes and expect a product to produce to you the next world record. Any product expects some woods knowledge, but it does not promise the next world record. Sure there are all different degrees of hunter out there, but you can not expect the same degree of experience or knowledge from them. Does a certain broadhead "cover the butt" of a less knowledgeable hunter from making a bad shot? Does a certain coat or pants make that hunter invisionable even if he chews, smokes, pee's, or other mistakes? Does a bottle of urine or scent "cover the butt" of you the hunter, or make you the invisionable whitetail bucks that challenges his territory? Nose Jammer is not pure vanilla and to describe it as that is unfair. But I feel that you had your mind made up before you ask for any of "our" (hunters) opinion. You either believe in something or you don't.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Dave Hurteau wrote 2 years 8 weeks ago

With respect, Judy:
I said "designed to cover the butts." That is, it explicitly promises to "jam noses." And clearly, I don't believe it does--any more than I think a certain broadhead covers the butt of a lousy shot. Saying that something is designed to cover butts is not the same as saying it actually does cover butts.

Also, I didn't say it was pure vanilla. I said "vanillin-based." Pointing out that other hunters have used vanilla extract does not equal "Nose Jammer is vanilla extract."

I am always interest in everyone's opinion. Yours included, and thank you for it.
Mine is merely an opinion, too. That's why I said "Maybe it's just me...."

If you want to think I didn't give it a fair trail, that's okay. All I can tell you is that I did.
Thanks for you input; keep it coming.

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from Dave Hurteau wrote 2 years 8 weeks ago

Sorry, that's: "interested" and "trial."

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Ricardo Rodríguez wrote 2 years 8 weeks ago

I suppose it can deserve a try.
If it doesn´t work you can always use it in your car.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from NHshtr wrote 2 years 8 weeks ago

Ricardo,

If not in the car, maybe as a room spray...or a floor wax!

I've had deer walk to a dozen feet from me out in the open. But only when the breeze was from the deer to me.
Never when the wind was in the reverse.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Hank111 wrote 2 years 8 weeks ago

Dave, I also am very skeptical about products like nosejammer, but have you ever heard of Judy Kovar before? She has killed more mature bucks with a bow from ground level than most of us combined. When she talks I am willing to listen.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Dave Hurteau wrote 2 years 8 weeks ago

Hank,
Yup. I know who Judy is. She's a fantastic hunter, and I'm glad she's joined the conversation. I'm with you: When she talks I am willing to listen, too. But I reserve the right to respectfully disagree.
The funny thing is, if you read any of my post about Nose Jammer, nowhere do I say that it can't help you in the field. In fact, in the post above, I suggest that it can.
What I object to specifically is the explicit claim that it "Jams Big Game's Animal's Ability to Smell," which as far as I can tell, it does not.

Judy,
I hope I didn't seem combative. I love a good debate. Please join us anytime.

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from buckhunter wrote 2 years 8 weeks ago

I think we will all agree a persons resume has nothing to do with how well a product works.

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from Dave Hurteau wrote 2 years 8 weeks ago

If only all hunters could agree on that one, buckhunter...then maybe we coule be spared the barrage of "celebrity" endorsements.

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from RockySquirrel wrote 2 years 8 weeks ago

Ok. I looked up Ms. Judy and I am officially impressed. You guys are way out of my league.

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from Longbeard wrote 2 years 8 weeks ago

The claim that Nose Jammer "jams" an animal's sense of smell is ridiculous and the fact that its on the can is a reflection of the integrity of much of the outdooor industry. But cover scents have worked, to varying degrees, ever since man first encountered animals, either as predator or prey. How well they work depends on a myriad of factors, not the least of which is how much stink they are supposed to be covering. And anyone who says its just a lame crutch for the hunter who lacks the skill to keep the wind at his/her back has evidently never hunted a shifting wind, which is about all you get anywhere there are hills.

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from Longbeard wrote 2 years 8 weeks ago

The claim that Nose Jammer "jams" an animal's sense of smell is ridiculous and the fact that its on the can is a reflection of the integrity of much of the outdooor industry. But cover scents have worked, to varying degrees, ever since man first encountered animals, either as predator or prey. How well they work depends on a myriad of factors, not the least of which is how much stink they are supposed to be covering. And anyone who says its just a lame crutch for the hunter who lacks the skill to keep the wind at his/her back has evidently never hunted a shifting wind, which is about all you get anywhere there are hills.

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from Dave Hurteau wrote 2 years 8 weeks ago

Longbeard,
I wonder if the Adirondack Mountains and foothills, where I live and hunt, count as hills? Your point is well-taken, though; keeping deer upwind of you is indeed not ALWAYS about skill. But skill still plays a big role, even in hill country.
I don't use cover scents, but I have no problem with anyone who does.

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from jwg123 wrote 2 years 7 weeks ago

I had a bird dog get sprayed in the face by a skunk,I told my hunting buddy "well that dog is done for the day won't be able to smell a thing now"the dog went 50 yds and pointed a single Quail in a fence line.Jam a animals nose,I don't think so.

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from Corey Bonnin wrote 45 weeks 5 days ago

I have used Nose Jammer for the past 2 seasons and have my fair share of good and bad with it.. What I have found over the past couple seasons that seems to work best for me, is using it purely as a cover scent on the bottom of my boots when I leave the field, and enter my favorite timber stands. Based on majority of my successes, if a deer cuts my boot tracks, the cover scent seems to convince that deer enough where it doesn't want to bury it's nose in it and search and find that "stored human predator cue" it has associated with a humans scent. This (based on my experiences) seems calm a skittish deer and keep them from arming their alert system. However, once and if they get downwind, 9-10 times they are going to pick you off (especially a mature animal). I've also had the same luck with a little bit of coon urine as well (until the cap broke and it saturated my pack one afternoon). Take what is written on the can with a grain of salt, however I have seen it live up to my expectations and many others as well. John Redmond of Fair Chase Products LLC is an accomplished hunter and guide, and I have listened to him indulge on this topic quite thoroughly. One thing I'm sure we all can agree on is that "user error" is quite frankly the most common recipe for disaster when using this product, along with the many other hunting scents on the market today. But as most seasoned hunters understand, it's that you must try to hunt using a favorable wind in order to reap the benefits of your efforts more times then none. Happy hunting to all the followers of this post, as well as in the hunting community that we fight to keep in existence. God Bless.

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from buckhunter wrote 2 years 8 weeks ago

I should add this is not exclusive to the hunting market. Golf manufacturers, diet companies, fishing manufacturers all sell hope. The hope that this one thing will make the difference. Sadly, many fall for these gimmicks.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from buckhunter wrote 2 years 8 weeks ago

If you step back and look at the market for whitetail hunting products, this stuff fits right in. Lots of companies making money selling hope, not good product.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from NHshtr wrote 2 years 8 weeks ago

I've always been careful to keep my hunting clothes away from cooking odors (breakfast, dinner) when in camp.

But now, perhaps I'll bake a batch of vanilla cookies in them before I go out.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from ITHACASXS wrote 2 years 8 weeks ago

If plain old vanilla brings 'em in, just imagine what a few cannolis around your stand will do. Of course, I couldn't shoot a deer that was enjoying a cannoli, unless it was my cannoli.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Dave Hurteau wrote 2 years 8 weeks ago

"...Nose Jammer is only as good as you the hunter makes it."

Don't mean to be a jerk, Kovar, but what in the world does that mean? It seems to me that Nose Jammer is designed to cover the butts of hunters who lack the skill to keep deer upwind. Other than the ability to read the directions on the can, what special skills are required of the hunter to use the stuff effectively?

Just asking....

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Oryx wrote 2 years 8 weeks ago

Up in my neck of the woods, we use "Toe Jammer."

The can looks about the same, but it's motto is a bit different:

"Jams Big Game Animal’s Ability to Smell (for weeks), propensity to eat, will to live, and general demeanor."

Powerful stuff.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Sarge01 wrote 2 years 8 weeks ago

steve182,
Reminds me of the last greatest club that I bought that insured me of making a birdy on every hole. Didn't quite work.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Kovar Judy wrote 2 years 8 weeks ago

I'm a "ground-pounder" of a bowhunter, won't find me in a treestand. Stalk & or ground/blind. I'm Native American and have long'd for a natural earth bound Mother Nature type product, not urine or gland type product. Nose Jammer along with a good suitable scent-lok scent elimation system and the use of Nose Jammer allowed me to take a buck in Dec. 2011. (And yes, the wind was blowing and hitting the back of my neck then toward the buck.)Slowly walking & waiting, walk & wait. This buck stood broadside and constantly nosed the wind. The buck allowed me to walk/stalk from 30 to 40 yds. to less than 15 yds. Now picture this, we are both standing out in the open of a picked bean field.The buck was trying to sort all this out when my arrow connected.
Never once did he stomp, flag or snort. Face to face as my ancestors once did & and yes Native American used scent control and earth bound cover-ups to mess up their animals minds. The whole story will be in BOWHUNTER MAGAZINE probably in the WHITETAIL Special. One must remember that your clothing, weapon and scent or lure or Nose Jammer is only as good as you the hunter makes it. But as I stand before you folks....Nose Jammer will always be in this Indians bowhunting plans.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from steve182 wrote 2 years 8 weeks ago

I believe a lot of products work because of the "placebo affect". If i try a new product and kill or see deer that hunt, it works. This is not always sound. But all that matters is if you think it's working,...it's working. Also good marketing will get mant to try at least once out of curiousity. I'm sure the profit margin on this stuff is high. I won't be buying any.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from bat man wrote 2 years 8 weeks ago

I like jammin, and have had great luck with it. Had a doe snort at me 3 times one night and watched her come into the food plot at the opposite end of the field. (there were other deer in the field.) Killed her at 25 yards 45 minutes later. Did something to her nose she did not like, but she is in the freezer now.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from jcarlin wrote 2 years 8 weeks ago

I don't really believe in cover scents as such. However a friend of mine has had good success using Vanilla as a curiousity scent, which is what your observations seem to support.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from jcarlin wrote 2 years 8 weeks ago

In support of that last statement. I doubted my buddy and went out back one day and left a meandering trail of vanilla extract crossing the opening. Later in the day I watched a doe follow the line nose down. I'd say it works as a draw. Probably will until it becomes associated with hunters.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Walt Smith wrote 2 years 8 weeks ago

After reading your first article concerning Nose Jammer I tried some pure vanilla extract that I bought in mexico a few years ago-- the results were all deer that started to come towards my stand sniffed the air then turned and walked the other way. Needless to say my name won't be on the product endorsement list!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from steve182 wrote 2 years 8 weeks ago

As buckhunter said there are manufacturers in every market selling products that claim to do things they don't. Simply put, you can't buy success, in deer hunting, or in golf. I will admit after reading the first f&s piece on nosejammer i sprinkled a couple scent wicks with vanillin and used them on a few hunts. I did not see a deer i don't believe, but heard a few snorts.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Kovar Judy wrote 2 years 8 weeks ago

I'm a "ground-pounder" of a bowhunter, won't find me in a treestand. Stalk & or ground/blind. I'm Native American and have long'd for a natural earth bound Mother Nature type product, not urine or gland type product. Nose Jammer along with a good suitable scent-lok scent elimation system and the use of Nose Jammer allowed me to take a buck in Dec. 2011. (And yes, the wind was blowing and hitting the back of my neck then toward the buck.)Slowly walking & waiting, walk & wait. This buck stood broadside and constantly nosed the wind. The buck allowed me to walk/stalk from 30 to 40 yds. to less than 15 yds. Now picture this, we are both standing out in the open of a picked bean field.The buck was trying to sort all this out when my arrow connected.
Never once did he stomp, flag or snort. Face to face as my ancestors once did & and yes Native American used scent control and earth bound cover-ups to mess up their animals minds. The whole story will be in BOWHUNTER MAGAZINE probably in the WHITETAIL Special. One must remember that your clothing, weapon and scent or lure or Nose Jammer is only as good as you the hunter makes it. But as I stand before you folks....Nose Jammer will always be in this Indians bowhunting plans.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from steve182 wrote 2 years 8 weeks ago

Sarge, i had a good round this past week. Didn't make any birdies, but i had a lot of looks. Crazy,...decent golf at home in February. Passes the time till next hunting season.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from RS08 wrote 2 years 8 weeks ago

Dave,not just this is comically flabergasting. You didn't forget about that clothing line that advertised, " Forget the wind, just hunt" did you.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from dleurquin wrote 2 years 8 weeks ago

Well, if Nose Jammer doesn't work in the woods, at least it can be useful in the kitchen on the spice rack.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from buckhunter wrote 2 years 8 weeks ago

Kovar, May I recommend a book written by Saxton Pope, Hunting with the Bow and Arrow. Published 1923. True story of Ishi. You may find it very informative.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from labrador12 wrote 2 years 8 weeks ago

Do bears like vanilla? How about grizz. Sounds like a cheap way to bait?

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from murdock32 wrote 2 years 8 weeks ago

I think it all goes along the same line as smoking, I still do, and have had many a Deer stand and look at me, like they wanted to Bum a smoke. My brothers who quit many years back will stand close to the camp fire to help cover their scent, but think I stick of cigarette. Tell me if a animal knows the difference.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Kovar Judy wrote 2 years 8 weeks ago

Dave...."to cover the butts of hunters"...what I mean is that you the hunter can not use a product and still make
mistakes, big mistakes and expect a product to produce to you the next world record. Any product expects some woods knowledge, but it does not promise the next world record. Sure there are all different degrees of hunter out there, but you can not expect the same degree of experience or knowledge from them. Does a certain broadhead "cover the butt" of a less knowledgeable hunter from making a bad shot? Does a certain coat or pants make that hunter invisionable even if he chews, smokes, pee's, or other mistakes? Does a bottle of urine or scent "cover the butt" of you the hunter, or make you the invisionable whitetail bucks that challenges his territory? Nose Jammer is not pure vanilla and to describe it as that is unfair. But I feel that you had your mind made up before you ask for any of "our" (hunters) opinion. You either believe in something or you don't.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Dave Hurteau wrote 2 years 8 weeks ago

With respect, Judy:
I said "designed to cover the butts." That is, it explicitly promises to "jam noses." And clearly, I don't believe it does--any more than I think a certain broadhead covers the butt of a lousy shot. Saying that something is designed to cover butts is not the same as saying it actually does cover butts.

Also, I didn't say it was pure vanilla. I said "vanillin-based." Pointing out that other hunters have used vanilla extract does not equal "Nose Jammer is vanilla extract."

I am always interest in everyone's opinion. Yours included, and thank you for it.
Mine is merely an opinion, too. That's why I said "Maybe it's just me...."

If you want to think I didn't give it a fair trail, that's okay. All I can tell you is that I did.
Thanks for you input; keep it coming.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Dave Hurteau wrote 2 years 8 weeks ago

Sorry, that's: "interested" and "trial."

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Ricardo Rodríguez wrote 2 years 8 weeks ago

I suppose it can deserve a try.
If it doesn´t work you can always use it in your car.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from NHshtr wrote 2 years 8 weeks ago

Ricardo,

If not in the car, maybe as a room spray...or a floor wax!

I've had deer walk to a dozen feet from me out in the open. But only when the breeze was from the deer to me.
Never when the wind was in the reverse.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Hank111 wrote 2 years 8 weeks ago

Dave, I also am very skeptical about products like nosejammer, but have you ever heard of Judy Kovar before? She has killed more mature bucks with a bow from ground level than most of us combined. When she talks I am willing to listen.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Dave Hurteau wrote 2 years 8 weeks ago

Hank,
Yup. I know who Judy is. She's a fantastic hunter, and I'm glad she's joined the conversation. I'm with you: When she talks I am willing to listen, too. But I reserve the right to respectfully disagree.
The funny thing is, if you read any of my post about Nose Jammer, nowhere do I say that it can't help you in the field. In fact, in the post above, I suggest that it can.
What I object to specifically is the explicit claim that it "Jams Big Game's Animal's Ability to Smell," which as far as I can tell, it does not.

Judy,
I hope I didn't seem combative. I love a good debate. Please join us anytime.

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from buckhunter wrote 2 years 8 weeks ago

I think we will all agree a persons resume has nothing to do with how well a product works.

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from Dave Hurteau wrote 2 years 8 weeks ago

If only all hunters could agree on that one, buckhunter...then maybe we coule be spared the barrage of "celebrity" endorsements.

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from RockySquirrel wrote 2 years 8 weeks ago

Ok. I looked up Ms. Judy and I am officially impressed. You guys are way out of my league.

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from Longbeard wrote 2 years 8 weeks ago

The claim that Nose Jammer "jams" an animal's sense of smell is ridiculous and the fact that its on the can is a reflection of the integrity of much of the outdooor industry. But cover scents have worked, to varying degrees, ever since man first encountered animals, either as predator or prey. How well they work depends on a myriad of factors, not the least of which is how much stink they are supposed to be covering. And anyone who says its just a lame crutch for the hunter who lacks the skill to keep the wind at his/her back has evidently never hunted a shifting wind, which is about all you get anywhere there are hills.

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from Longbeard wrote 2 years 8 weeks ago

The claim that Nose Jammer "jams" an animal's sense of smell is ridiculous and the fact that its on the can is a reflection of the integrity of much of the outdooor industry. But cover scents have worked, to varying degrees, ever since man first encountered animals, either as predator or prey. How well they work depends on a myriad of factors, not the least of which is how much stink they are supposed to be covering. And anyone who says its just a lame crutch for the hunter who lacks the skill to keep the wind at his/her back has evidently never hunted a shifting wind, which is about all you get anywhere there are hills.

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from Dave Hurteau wrote 2 years 8 weeks ago

Longbeard,
I wonder if the Adirondack Mountains and foothills, where I live and hunt, count as hills? Your point is well-taken, though; keeping deer upwind of you is indeed not ALWAYS about skill. But skill still plays a big role, even in hill country.
I don't use cover scents, but I have no problem with anyone who does.

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from jwg123 wrote 2 years 7 weeks ago

I had a bird dog get sprayed in the face by a skunk,I told my hunting buddy "well that dog is done for the day won't be able to smell a thing now"the dog went 50 yds and pointed a single Quail in a fence line.Jam a animals nose,I don't think so.

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from Corey Bonnin wrote 45 weeks 5 days ago

I have used Nose Jammer for the past 2 seasons and have my fair share of good and bad with it.. What I have found over the past couple seasons that seems to work best for me, is using it purely as a cover scent on the bottom of my boots when I leave the field, and enter my favorite timber stands. Based on majority of my successes, if a deer cuts my boot tracks, the cover scent seems to convince that deer enough where it doesn't want to bury it's nose in it and search and find that "stored human predator cue" it has associated with a humans scent. This (based on my experiences) seems calm a skittish deer and keep them from arming their alert system. However, once and if they get downwind, 9-10 times they are going to pick you off (especially a mature animal). I've also had the same luck with a little bit of coon urine as well (until the cap broke and it saturated my pack one afternoon). Take what is written on the can with a grain of salt, however I have seen it live up to my expectations and many others as well. John Redmond of Fair Chase Products LLC is an accomplished hunter and guide, and I have listened to him indulge on this topic quite thoroughly. One thing I'm sure we all can agree on is that "user error" is quite frankly the most common recipe for disaster when using this product, along with the many other hunting scents on the market today. But as most seasoned hunters understand, it's that you must try to hunt using a favorable wind in order to reap the benefits of your efforts more times then none. Happy hunting to all the followers of this post, as well as in the hunting community that we fight to keep in existence. God Bless.

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