Please Sign In

Please enter a valid username and password
  • Log in with Facebook
» Not a member? Take a moment to register
» Forgot Username or Password

Why Register?
Signing up could earn you gear (click here to learn how)! It also keeps offensive content off our site.

Scouting Tip: Go For the Green Beans

Recent Comments

Categories

Recent Posts

Archives

Syndicate

Google Reader or Homepage
Add to My Yahoo!
Add to My AOL

Whitetail 365
in your Inbox

Enter your email address to get our new post everyday.

October 02, 2013

Scouting Tip: Go For the Green Beans

By Scott Bestul

We talk a lot about transitions during this phase of the whitetail season, and the bean field pictured above is a perfect example. As any farm-country deer hunter knows, whitetails are nuts for soybeans. Early in the season, they eat the foliage, but that attraction fades as soon as the leaves on the bean plant start to yellow, like the majority of those in the pictured field. Once this change occurs, whitetails typically shun beans until much later in the season when they'll return to the brown, dried-up plants to eat the pods and beans.

But look in the foreground of this shot. See that small patch of bean leaves that are still green? Right now, deer will walk across an entire field of yellowed plants to snack on that pocket of lush, green ones, and if your stand or blind is within shooting distance of the greenery, you can enjoy excellent action. The best places to find verdant bean foliage is on the field edges where shade trees delay plant maturity and in low-lying spots like waterways and riparian areas.

Speed scouting is a favorite tactic of mine, and the tactic lives up to its name when you can it from your vehicle just by looking for a certain color. Of course, like everything else in the fall, the window is closing quickly on this opportunity; spot a green patch of beans like this, and you've got maybe a week if you're lucky to hunt it before the plants mature. So jump on the opportunity.

Comments (2)

Top Rated
All Comments
from habben97 wrote 28 weeks 2 days ago

all the beans in my area are brown and leafless, or harvested. are the brow ones still worth hunting over? also, would hunting over a harvested bean field be worth it?

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Longrifle wrote 28 weeks 22 hours ago

True Dat! Very good advice. Tender soft green over dry crunchy brown anyday.

I once had a great conversation with a very well respected game department biologist here in the North East. He told me, deer will always go for the most palatable, easily digested food.

habben97. Any soft mast in the area? Apples, grapes, crabapple? Or high protein hard mast like acorns or beech?

Here the deer Are practically ignoring the green soybeans for acorns. Probably a 5/1 ratio. Remember, hoof prints don't lie.

0 Good Comment? | | Report

Post a Comment

from habben97 wrote 28 weeks 2 days ago

all the beans in my area are brown and leafless, or harvested. are the brow ones still worth hunting over? also, would hunting over a harvested bean field be worth it?

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Longrifle wrote 28 weeks 22 hours ago

True Dat! Very good advice. Tender soft green over dry crunchy brown anyday.

I once had a great conversation with a very well respected game department biologist here in the North East. He told me, deer will always go for the most palatable, easily digested food.

habben97. Any soft mast in the area? Apples, grapes, crabapple? Or high protein hard mast like acorns or beech?

Here the deer Are practically ignoring the green soybeans for acorns. Probably a 5/1 ratio. Remember, hoof prints don't lie.

0 Good Comment? | | Report

Post a Comment

bmxbiz-fs