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Wild Side: Mashed Pumpkin

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October 31, 2011

Wild Side: Mashed Pumpkin

By David Draper

Sure mashed potatoes are the standard side dish for a big, fat venison steak or deer roast, but with Thanksgiving just around the corner, why not try a couple of ingredients that offer up some autumn flavors? Somewhat surprisingly, pumpkin and allspice make a great compliment to venison, and while you can pair them a number of ways, an easy mashed pumpkin side dish just might be the best.

*When buying (or growing) a pumpkin for this dish, try to avoid jack-o-lantern type pumpkins which generally have a thinner flesh. Look for pumpkin pie or cheese pumpkins at your local market.

Honeyed Mashed Pumpkin

1 fresh pumpkin of about 3-5 lbs.
2 tbs. honey
2 tbs. butter
½ tsp. allspice

Preheat oven to 450°.

Cut pumpkin in half, scoop out seeds and place each half flesh-side down in baking dish.
Bake 30-45 minutes, or until you can pierce the skin with a knife.
(Alternately, you can boil or steam chunks of pumpkin, but I feel roasting adds a deeper flavor.)

Remove pumpkin from oven and scoop flesh into medium saucepan set over low heat.

Add butter, honey and allspice.

Mash thoroughly and serve warm with grilled venison steaks or venison roast.

 

Comments (3)

Top Rated
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from Levi Banks wrote 2 years 24 weeks ago

I love pumpkin in all sorts of ways, but I've never tried it mostly on its own. The weather was so dry and hot this summer my garden pumpkins never did anything, but I bought a couple so I'll be trying this out real soon.

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from Hornd wrote 2 years 24 weeks ago

I want to make a Pumpkin beer badly. Although expensive ($9 bomber), Southern Tier Pumpking Beer is divine. I also here there Creme Brulee is to die for.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Brian W. Thair wrote 2 years 24 weeks ago

Cut the carved face off the Hallowe'en pumpkin & toss it out.
Cut the rest into large slabs.
Cross-hatch with a sharp knife.
Rub with butter or marg.
smear with brown sugar.
shake to brown with cinnamon.
Bake 375 x 45+mins on a sheet.
Why waste a perfectly good piece of food? No, it isn't "thick-fleshed." But, my version is both kid-tested and kid-approved.

0 Good Comment? | | Report

Post a Comment

from Levi Banks wrote 2 years 24 weeks ago

I love pumpkin in all sorts of ways, but I've never tried it mostly on its own. The weather was so dry and hot this summer my garden pumpkins never did anything, but I bought a couple so I'll be trying this out real soon.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Hornd wrote 2 years 24 weeks ago

I want to make a Pumpkin beer badly. Although expensive ($9 bomber), Southern Tier Pumpking Beer is divine. I also here there Creme Brulee is to die for.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Brian W. Thair wrote 2 years 24 weeks ago

Cut the carved face off the Hallowe'en pumpkin & toss it out.
Cut the rest into large slabs.
Cross-hatch with a sharp knife.
Rub with butter or marg.
smear with brown sugar.
shake to brown with cinnamon.
Bake 375 x 45+mins on a sheet.
Why waste a perfectly good piece of food? No, it isn't "thick-fleshed." But, my version is both kid-tested and kid-approved.

0 Good Comment? | | Report

Post a Comment