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Contest: Win a New Cookbook and a Dutch Oven!

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February 06, 2012

Contest: Win a New Cookbook and a Dutch Oven!

By Colin Kearns

Every day this week the Wild Chef will feature recipes and tips from the brand new cookbook, The Lodge Cast Iron Cookbook. We'll also be giving away some great prizes, including copies of the book, a Lodge cast-iron skillet, and Lodge cast-iron Dutch oven.

How’s this for a day: The other turkey hunters and I crawled out of our tents around 4 a.m. The stars in western Nebraska hung so low, you were tempted to reach for one. My hunting partner, Jim, and I teamed up with Phillip Vanderpoole to hunt from a blind on the edge of an alfalfa field. I killed a tom at 7 a.m. A few hours later, Jim shot a gobbler of his own. We were back at camp by 11 a.m., where the kitchen crew had prepared a champion’s breakfast of eggs, pancakes, and sausage.

The three of us went back out for a late-afternoon hunt and, with maybe 20 minutes left of shooting time, Jim and I doubled on two more toms. Back at camp, there were plenty of cheers, stories and beers. There was also one of the most memorable meals of my life. Joe Arterburn, of Cabela’s, whipped up wild turkey enchiladas in a cast-iron Dutch oven. They were so good that, years later, I still wish I would’ve had another helping. Yes, what a day that was.

I’m sharing this meal memory today, because I’m excited about the new Lodge Cast Iron Cookbook. The book is a treasure of stories, recipes, and cooking techniques—all about cast iron—and it belongs on the shelf of every camp cook. You’ll see what I mean very soon: Over the next few days on the Wild Chef I’m going to post recipes and tips from the book. I’ll also be giving away copies of the book, plus a couple of great prizes from Lodge. Starting with a brand new Dutch oven.

I’ve told the story of my favorite Dutch oven meal. Now it’s your turn. In the comments section, I want to hear about the best Dutch oven meal you ever ate in the outdoors. Try to keep it brief (100 words or less) and definitely keep it appetizing. I’ll pick the best-sounding meal and award the winner with a copy of the Lodge Cast Iron Cookbook, plus an 8-quart Lodge Dutch oven. Deadline for entries is 9:00 A.M. (EST) on Friday, February 10. Good luck!

Comments (48)

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from jbird wrote 2 years 10 weeks ago

Wow, what a day!

My Dutch oven story isn't quite as good. A good buddy and I had went on several turkey&trout trips every spring. Hunting on state ground, camping and trout fishing in the afternoons (can only hunt till 1pm in MO). After 4 years of striking out on birds on public lands, I called in a big ol' 24# tom that morning. When I got back to camp, my buddy had struck out again that morning and quit early. I could smell breakfast cooking as I strolled in triumphantly with my bird. Nothing exotic, Dutch oven biscuits, sausage gravy and fried taters. Breakfast never tasted so good.

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from jvidrine wrote 2 years 10 weeks ago

One of my most memorable dutch oven meals was when a few buddies of mine went to North Texas on a deer/duck hunt. We're all from South Louisiana and the high that week was in the 'teens with big wind gusts throughout the day. After breaking ice on the ponds for the ducks to land and hunting that morning we arrived back to the camp. Everyone was very hungry from a long hunt in the cold and I whipped up my famous crawfish tails and green onion scrambled eggs in the dutch oven over the fire. Along with that I made homemade buscuits, also in the dutch over. That gave everyone the burst of entergy to make an afternoon deer hunt. No one was successful that evening, yet no one complained when returning to the camp to see my dad cooking a venison chili over the fire, once again in the dutch over. It was a great weekend with great friends.

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from Jeric Wheeler wrote 2 years 10 weeks ago

peach and apircot cobbler, in same oven, was so good I think i will make it tomorrow here at the house

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from WyDave wrote 2 years 10 weeks ago

Before camped at Jenny Lake in Grand Teton this past summer, I peeled, sliced and seasoned apples with sugar, cinnamon, allspice, nutmeg and butter, and froze the result in a plastic bag, which went wayyyy down in the bottom of the cooler. Then one evening when my wife was at a ranger-led talk, I put the filling in the camp oven inside of a store bought pie crust and baked it over the coals. The result was truly tasty, both as dessert and with bacon and eggs the next morning.

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from Scott Alexander wrote 2 years 10 weeks ago

My grandfather took me camping and fishing as I finished my Webelos and was about to start Boy Scouts. I woke up every morning to bacon and eggs being cooked in a cast iron skillet over a firewhile biscuits cooked in the dutch oven.

Now, twenty years later, my grandfather has passed, but I cooked for my daughters, who are about to turn four, this very same, simple breakfast as my wife and I took them on their very first camping trip.

It's not a gourmet breakfast, but it's a breakfast that I never forgot growing up, nor will I ever forget as they grow up.

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from mtndew824 wrote 2 years 10 weeks ago

Shepherds pie, with ground venison on the bottom covered in fresh veggies and venison gravy and topped off with mash potatoes.Let it simmer for a while and dish it out!!

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from Anthony Nicolazzo wrote 2 years 10 weeks ago

My dutch over story is from going on a hunting trip in New Hampshire with my father and some other relatives. We shot a few rabbit one day, and sticking to our Italian roots, we quartered the rabbit and sauted him up, then made a tomato sauce right over him and simmered him for a while.

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from Tim Grieger wrote 2 years 10 weeks ago

I bought my Dutch Oven for camping trips but mostly for use with our Cub Scout Den, (I am our Dens Leader) what better way to teach the boys how to both cook a tasty treat and have fun while doing it, just wish I could get another one so we can have the Main course and desert cooking at the same time! Apple BlueBerry Cobbler is always a crowd pleaser in our Den!

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from Tamara Bosman wrote 2 years 10 weeks ago

Mu Dutch Oven came in handy on a smelting trip last year. I made biscuits ahead of time, and put them in a baggie. Then when we were on the shore of Lake Superior smelting, I decided to stop helping with the smelting and make the guys something to eat. They were at this time hungry and getting tired as the morning sun was coming up. I got everything together and put my Dutch Oven right on top of the fire. Well needless to say I had forgotten a spoon to stir and serve. So one of the guys came up with an idea. Hey grab a rounded oblong shaped rock and a piece of driftwood off of the beach. There was some yellow caution tape laying on the beach. He grabbed it and wrapped one end of the rock to the driftwood and we had our spoon. It worked great and we had one heck of a story to tell when we got home. We still have that homemade spoon, it is quite the conversation piece.

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from diplomat019 wrote 2 years 10 weeks ago

Best dutch oven recipe for me was harvesting a doe and taking it back to camp. my buddy and i butchered the deer and built a fire outside. we floured the cubed venison and sauteed it with onions and garlic until it was brown, then added some thyme and parsley and covered it all with red wine. we left it cooking for hours until the wine was almost all gone. then we toasted some italian bread over the fire and and enjoyed the food outside with some beverages. I would like to thank the good Lord for making me Italian

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from Philip Cornett wrote 2 years 10 weeks ago

This wasn't on a camping trip but it was delicous. My church home group had a bonfire at one of the church elders' home. I brought my Lodge oven and some peaches and a white cake mix and made a quick cobbler. Unbenownst to me, the elders' wife had milked the cows that morning and was making ice cream with it. The most delicious vanilla ice cream and cobbler I have ever had, next to wonderful wood fire on a cool October evening.

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from MaxPower wrote 2 years 10 weeks ago

At our hunting camp in Wyoming we aren't allowed to let our horses graze, so we have to haul alfalfa pellets (along with all our food and gear) nine miles in to camp from the trailhead.

Midway through the week my uncle and cousin and I road out to the trailhead for more pellets. After loading 1600 lbs. on 8 mules we rode back in to camp after dark with a full moon. It was so bright I still remember seeing deer clearly at 50 yards away and my uncle's big grey spooking because of a porcupine in the trail.

The cook greeted us with piping hot elk stew (with red potatoes) and biscuits, both straight from 'the dutch'. After 18 miles and 4 hours in the saddle, I was famished.

Dinner always tastes better in the mountains

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from bassman06 wrote 2 years 10 weeks ago

Mine was in scouts too. I was a new scout at a new troop at the time, getting to know people. Now one of our leaders, who looks extremely close, and I mean really close to Mr. Chuck Norris. The campout was almost to an end and he used two dutch ovens. One contained the most amazing homemade, or should I say camp made beef stew I had ever consumed. The other held a delicious cobbler of peaches, cherries and a little dash of a red wine that he brought for the adults. Needless to say, I wish I helped myself to more of that stew... and the cobbler!!!

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from epicfisher wrote 2 years 10 weeks ago

Not quite a dutch oven story, but my friend brings a cast iron waffle maker to our camping trips. Adding in the flavor of the cast iron and the smokey flavor of the fire, I've never tasted better waffles

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from Montanagyrene wrote 2 years 10 weeks ago

One of the faculty at the satellite campus where I work has made some KILLER main dishes for our Christmas Faculty/Staff luncheons including a spicy beef and bean dish. I ate so much I almost got sick, but it was worth it. He's teaching at the main campus this year, so we were out of luck, but I'm SURE my coworkers would LOVE for me to win the oven, and bring back a tradition!!

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from Levi Banks wrote 2 years 10 weeks ago

The best combination of memorable and delicious happened this fall. My two brothers and I had taken my oldest nephew deer hunting. When we got home my wife had made a pot of venison chili over a fire in the backyard. Venison pumpkin chili on a perfect November night. We sat around the fire talking and just having a good time until well past the normal bedtime like I hadn't done with my brothers in a few years. He didn’t get a deer that day, but the next morning he got his first one maybe 150 yards from our campfire.

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from Ace22 wrote 2 years 10 weeks ago

I bought my Dutch oven for 11$ at a sale,it has turned out to be the best old friend at the end of a long day.
When that cover is removed there could be a great stew with doughboys,a fantastic cake ,cinnamon rolls or the best biscuits ever eaten around a camp fire.Dutch ovens go with good friends and family.

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from Cody Las-Vegas wrote 2 years 10 weeks ago

I've actually never had a dutch oven meal. I can tell you that I would love to try more than just hot dogs on sticks at our next campfire. I know I am missing greatness.

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from Bernie wrote 2 years 10 weeks ago

It was NOT my best Dutch oven meal. I bought a Dutch oven in the mid-'70s, went up to a Forest Service campsite between Cheyenne and Laramie, Wyoming. Built an inferno in the recessed fire pit, then placed my Dutch oven, containing chicken pieces, spices and some liquid, onto the fire. When I opened the lid an hour or so later, I had a pile of ashes in the Dutch oven that I could hold in my hand. My wife, who divorced me several years later, was incensed. I did get better at Dutch oven cooking though. Four years ago I gave the Dutch oven to my current wife's niece. Had some good meals in that old Dutch oven, though, after the first fiasco.

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from Jacee wrote 2 years 10 weeks ago

My favorite memory so far was making chicken and dumplings at elk camp. I was 7 months pregnant, and had to work twice as hard getting the coals ready, cutting up the veggies and letting them cook, and browning the meat. I worked for nearly two hours on my feet cooking this meal for the whole camp. It was so delicious, and I have not been able to recreate how good it was... or maybe it was because I was finally able to sit down and relax!

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from Douglas wrote 2 years 10 weeks ago

My best dutch oven meal was had at a Civil War reenactment years ago. A member of our group brought a wild turkey he had picked up recently as fresh road kill. He had dressed out the bird and frozen it. We thawed the bird and took it apart so that it fit into two dutch ovens. All we added were onions, salt, pepper, and a bit of water. That turkey stewed all day over a slow camp fire. We sorted out the bones that evening and fixed a pone of corn bread in a skillet over the fire.
Best turkey dinner I have ever had.

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from sgtsly wrote 2 years 10 weeks ago

On a weekend camping trip to an obscure river landing on the Canoochee River, which winds through the back 40 on Fort Stewart, we put together a kind of Brunswick Stew. Whatever we caught went in a Dutch oven already started with canned tomatoes and corn. Added chopped celery and cubed taters and more than two Dixies. Bream, bass, catfish, and Frank's were added to create a pretty tasty "soup". The time spent together with good friends in the outdoors and the relationships built that trip, last until today.

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from Big Country wrote 2 years 10 weeks ago

When I was young(er) my family would go on Labor Day weekend camping trips every year to a local lake. On Saturday nights my cusin and I were allowed to get the fire pit going around dark. With unreal amounts of charcoal starter fluid we had a camp fire going, our sunburnt arms almost glowing from the added heat of fire. We'd come back to the camp from the shoreline and eat dinner every night but on Saturday nights, our playing in the fire was to be done early. Where a mini bonfire fueled by whatever we could fing in the bushes and lighter fluid had been there was now a glowing pile of charcoal brickets with a dutch oven in the middle of the fire ring. When my Grandpa would take the lid off to check the food the sweet smell of peaches would fill the air, people from other campsites would holler from somewhere how "damn good" that smelled. That dutch oven was full, and I do not misuse the term full, of peack cobbler. We would wait for what seemed like forever until we would see Grandma getting Ice cream (that I can assure you was not there the day before) and cream from the coolers and the frige inside their camper. I can almost taste it as I type this my foam bowl full of warm cream and hot cobbler. That is the food from the dutch oven that I can remember so sharply that I'm going to go to my grandparents hose today and try and get the recipe and see if I can do it in a regular oven.

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from Beekeeper wrote 2 years 10 weeks ago

About 10 years ago on a coastal feral hog hunt. I used my old Dutch oven to make one of the best gumbos I've ever made. A half hour at low tide with a cast net provided fresh white shrimp and 5-6 blue crabs. I also picked up and shucked out oysters from a small shell bar. Back at camp a simple broth was made from the shrimp heads and shells while I was making a nice dark roux. Chopped onion, bell pepper and celery that I had brought were added to the roux along with the broth, I then added the dressed and cracked blue crab. After simmering about 20 minutes the shrimp and oysters were added and 5 minutes later all was served over steaming rice and simply seasoned with salt and pepper.

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from Arlo269 wrote 2 years 10 weeks ago

Fresh Deer Strap Stew. Killed a nice doe a few years back and happened to have my Dutch Oven with me so we through in a few onions, carrots, and potatoes and put her on a slow cook while we finished dressing the doe. We had actually got busy and lost track of time but that happened to be the best thing that could have happened as it was the most tender meat I have ever had in my life. Slow and Low that is the tempo to a good Ducth Oven Cook.

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from 2Poppa wrote 2 years 10 weeks ago

A little over fifty years ago my step-dad Beckham, decided he was going to finally take me hunting. Now mind you, he wasn't just from Kentucky, he was from Appalachia, Kentucky, and knew a lot about hunting, farming, canning and moonshine.

We were camping out and going squirrel hunting and took along all of the necessities for a successful hunt. I got to carry the .22 rifle while Beckham carried an over and under shotgun. Midmorning, just before we left he dug a hole and started a fire. He mentioned something about, "it should be 'bout right when we get back."

He placed me under a large oak tree and told me to keep the tree in my sight at all times, as he was going to go further into the woods. As soon as he left I heard the report of his shotgun. A few moments later he shot again.

He silently walked back towards me and held two fingers up and motioned for me to stay put. About an hour goes by, when I noticed my step-dad moving through the tall oaks towards me.

He walked up to me and said,"it was time to get me a couple." We walked down into "hollers" and back up several ridges when I realized he had a destination in mind. We sat below a tall white oak and could hear the barking of squirrels.

He pointed one out to me as I took aim with the .22 rifle. The big red fell about thirty feet to the soft leaved floor. As we sat there we noticed an "ol' feller" walking up out of the "holler" to us; the squirrel that hit the ground still had his tail twitching.

The "ol' feller" yelled out, "Beck" ... as if he was asking a question. My step-dad yelled back, "it is he." We followed the older man down into the hollow and I was puzzled at the contraption, that was on the ground in front of my very young, eight year old eyes.

It was a moonshine still! I didn't comprehend everything that just had transpired that morning and afternoon, but someone had some well laid plans. We visited for a couple of hours when my step-dad told the "ol' feller" he wanted to get back to camp before dark.

By now I could eat a bear, but I didn't dare speak those words, as I was afraid my hillbilly step-dad might just agree. The .22 rifle I was carrying began to get heavier at we topped the last ridge. I thought I might see burning embers from the campfire my step-dad started, but the woods were dark except for the top of the trees where the moon was beginning to glow on them.

I was excited to get back to camp,as it felt like home, being so deep in these dark woods. My dad began to use a stick and dugged around the campfire he had started earlier in the day. Burning embers could be seen along with some sort of a pot. It was a "Dutch Oven", he said. I asked what was in it, just as he spoke the words, "Kentucky Burgoo."

He pulled the Dutch Oven out of the fire along with a cast iron skillet with a lid. When the lids came off, the aroma wafting in the night air made my stomach growl.
He had placed, mutton, two good size squirrels and a chicken along with onions, celery, potatoes, tomatoes and corn. What didn't he put in it was probably a better question? Did I mention cornpone?

I found out later the "two good size squirrels" was actually a ground hog! I couldn't tell the difference. I've tried to duplicate and replicate that recipe, but somehow I can't. Perhaps I never will and it's probably a lot better that way, as the memory still has life as it lives on in all of my five senses.

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from TM wrote 2 years 10 weeks ago

The single best meal ever cooked in cast iron (or in any other material for that matter) is the Ontario shore lunch. There are variations, but the standard is the same. Spend the morning catching bronzebacks, walleye, or perch. Find a secluded rocky area of shore. Start a small campfire and let it burn to embers (use this time to cool some beer in the lake). Fry thick cut bacon in cast iron over the embers. Note bacon is pork's highest calling, and campfire fried bacon is bacon's highest calling. When it is done frying, remove the bacon and save the rendered fat. Peel one potato per person and slice into 1/4 inch slices. Fry in hot bacon fat until the potatoes are crispy on the outside. Season with salt and pepper, remove from the pan. There should be some bacon fat remaining. Fry the fresh fish (bone in, not filets) in the remaining fat, just until cooked through. Retrieve your beer from the lake.

There you have the best meal one could possibly hope for. All in one skillet. Bacon, bacon flavored potatoes, and fresh fish over a smokey campfire, with cold beer. There is no better meal on the planet.

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from basspro1st wrote 2 years 9 weeks ago

While living in Alaska in 1968 as a youth we were returning from our annual month of camping and hunting in the Rainbow Mountains. During the time we spent in the mountains the rains had been pummeling the areas north towards Fairbanks while we enjoyed fabulous weather. Hunting and fishing was good as we caught salmon while my Dad and his buddy Ron hunted sheep and bear. Ron scored a nice ram and Dad had bagged a black bear.

As we traveled back to Eielson AFB the rains had swollen many of the rivers and had washed out part of the Salcha River bridge. We found a campground not far from there and setup our campsite in the pouring rain and dark.

By morning the sky had cleared up a bit and we inspected the campground. Many other travelers were caught in the flooding and could not get back home. Most were unprepared and had very little food or staples. Having some fresh meat but no or little additional foods we all pulled together at the campsite and inventoried our goods. Across the lake was an Army National Guard training facility and my Dad and brother canoed across and picked up everything they could spare us.

After peeling potatoes, carrots, onions and other veggies we put as much as possible in several large dutch ovens we had and proceeded to have the most incredible meal that was shared among 20-30 stranded travelers. For the next 3 days until the road was passable we had several of these wild game stews and made some life-long friends.

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from mdsulli2 wrote 2 years 9 weeks ago

My best D.O. story is from this year. Jeremy a guy I work with goes on vacation, hunting with a few friends the week before rifle season. They set up tents in northern Missouri for what they say is the best week to bow hunt. Jeremy asked if I wanted to go and I gladly accepted, in September. The first Saturday evening I got back to camp not expecting anyone to have shot a deer because the wind was fast and swirling where I set up. To my suprise they where heading back out to drag in a guys first deer with a bow. I started the coals and put together a peach cobbler. Two large cans of peaches and yellow cake mix. I brought the eggs, butter and milk alredy mixed. I added that to the mix and poured it over the peaches. I spaced the coals out, top and bottom. I put foil packets with chicken and veggies on the grill maybe fifteen minuts later I looked back at the D.O. and the coals on top where almost spent. The wind was blowing non stop causing the coals to burn out quick. I added the same amount of coals to the top again but was worried the cobbler would burn. After dinner we opened it up and it was golden brown. That hot desert on that cold windy night was just what we needed before hitting the sleeping bags. My wife thought camping in a tent with highs in the 40s and 20 mile an hour winds was insane but I'll be back next year!

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from Dan Dreelin wrote 2 years 9 weeks ago

One of the Best DO meals I made was on a January Trip at a Hunt club in West Virginia. I had Marinated some Venison in Burgundy and modified a Beef Burgundy Recipe and Slow cooked for about three hours. It just melted in your mouth. It was a full 14" Deep DO. Served it up with DO Biscuits and a Caramel Apple Cobbler. There wasn't a drop of food left. Great meal for a Chilly evening.

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from Tom-Tom wrote 2 years 9 weeks ago

We were camped on a small island in Arkansas where the Buffalo flows into the White River. Before setting out for that last morning, we put the last of the burger, sausage and beans and bacon in the dutch oven along with chopped onion and any other available spices a put some V8 juice on top and then set it in the coals. When we got back the temperature had dropped into the low 40's and a storm was brewing. We broke camp and packed the boat for the short trip to the public landing before we lifted the lid, gave it a stir and then dipped our cups into the mixture. We slurped it down and kept at it until everything was gone. As the rain started to fall, someone said that he was glad his wife wasn't along because she sure wouldn't appreciate all the fun we were having.

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from TexAg wrote 2 years 9 weeks ago

I haven't ever had a dutch oven meal because I've never owned one, but I won one then that would be a different story...

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from rserpa wrote 2 years 9 weeks ago

We were camping and steelhead fishing on the Mosquitoe River in the UP of Michigan years ago. My buddy wanted to cook a turkey in his new dutch oven by burying the DO in a pit with hot stones. Being new to DO cooking he added some extra water to be sure the bird didn't dry out. Needless to say there was too much moisture and every time the DO burbed to release some steam it sucked in some sand. Regardless, the best turkey we ever had even if it was a little gritty.

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from John Vogel wrote 2 years 9 weeks ago

Myself and a friend were bow hunting elk in Montana and kept missing our chances at hitting one until our last day when finally a bull stepped out a bit to far. We butchered it in camp and started the kitchen prep. I had planned to make a Daube stew with the elk so I hauled my le creuset dutch oven and the ingredients. the wine and cognac were put in water bottles and i had to leave the bacon behind. still the best meal ever eaten in camp.

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from Proverbs wrote 2 years 9 weeks ago

My favorite Dutch oven meal was shore lunch in northern Ontario some 20 years ago. After a morning of catching walleye and perch, we boated back to camp where the guide's helper made short work of sending the filets into kettles of boiling oil. The aroma was wonderful, but was eclipsed when the helper revealed three Dutch ovens by scraping the coals off the lids and opening them. One had biscuits blossoming out the top. The second held an ambrosic mixture of potatoes, cheese and onions. The third was bubbling with Alberta peach cobbler. I was Dutch-hooked immediately.

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from Baccon wrote 2 years 9 weeks ago

Years ago I worked for the Boy Scouts of the Concho Valley in TX. During my time with them I ran the summer camp. My favorite thing to do was walk through the campsites every night and test the deserts made by the troops. It became a joke because I kept a fork in my shirt pocket. I tried to explain that I was just checking on everyone, but it was no secret that I had my own agenda. Favorite was Black Forest Cobbler!!!

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from Ken48 wrote 2 years 9 weeks ago

My favorite Dutch Oven story comes from a two day flea market and camping overnight with our son, daughter and her family. I headed back to camp early to start the pinapple/blueberry cobbler and the homemade icecream. They all showed up toting a 50lb bag of potatoes and one of onions on the 4-wheeler. We set my daughter's 16" cast iron skillet over the LP burner and started frying potatoes and onions in butter. We were all grabbing those crispy fried potatoes and onions as fast they cooked while the smell of bubbling pineapple and blueberries filled the air. Never did get the burgers cooked, but we all still talk about that wonderful meal.

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from Coleman Cain wrote 2 years 9 weeks ago

My "best" DO story also comes from Scouting. A few years ago, I became Scoutmaster for our local Scout Troop. The former Scoutmaster had a bunch of of the troop's equipment in her garage and while loading it up in my car to take to our storage area, I found 3 old, rusty lodge DO's. Well, I put them with our other gear and didn't think any more about them. A couple of months later, I came across an article on the web about DO cooking and how great it was, so I started researching - how to use DO's, how to clean them, recipes - the works!

The next Tuesday, I took the one I thought was in the best shape home and got out the wire brush and started scrubbing the rust off of that DO and kept at it for a couple of days until all the rust was gone and the DO was practically silver! Then, I wiped it down with veg. oil and put in the oven at the highest temp and started reseasoning it. Well, the DO started to smoke and stink and my wife was ready to throw me and my oven out of the house!

Luckily, she didn't and I got the DO well seasoned and took it on our next campout and tried a simple dump cake. It didn't work - I baked a hockey puck (which by the way is exactly what my Scouts used it for).

Anyway, I learned from my mistake and started making everything in the DO. Now, that's all I do. I even steal slow cooker recipes from my wife's good housekeeping magazines and try them out in the field.

Last week I made Spiced Chocolate Bread Pudding for dessert for my assistant scoutmasters and have to say that was my best dessert yet!

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from joejv4 wrote 2 years 9 weeks ago

Campfire pie - really simple and we used to make it with apple pie filling, but cherry, pumpkin or whatever else you may choose works.

This is one for camping where there is no stove or over and requires a good old cast iron dutch oven.

Ingredients are ones that can be packed in (but the canned filling will add a bit of weight.)

Bisquick and water to make a dough similar in consistency to pizza dough - and there's a reason for this. for the crust, since we're roughing it, we toss the dough like pizza then line the bottom and sides of the dutch oven with one crust, fill with our favorite pie filling, toss another crust for the top. Cover the dutch oven and place on a bed of coals, and add coals to the top of the lid and let cook for around 15 minutes.

A great desert for around the camp fire!

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from Frederick Willi... wrote 2 years 9 weeks ago

We were camping in Yosemite for a week with 4 other families. It was "Rib Night" but we were all tired from a hike earlier in the day and no one was in the mood to 'Babysit' ribs ove the coals, so I suggested throwing them in a Dutch Oven. We had Beef Ribs, Pork spare ribs and baby backs cut up, seasoned and stuffed in a Dutch Oven. A second Dutch oven cooked Cheesy Corn Bread with jalapinos. Once the ribs cooked down and started falling off the bone, we siphoned off the grease, poured in some BBQ sauce, gave them another 30min on the fire then had the BEST Ribs & Corn Bread EVER!
Lining the Ovens with Heave Duty aluminum foil allowed for a quick clean-up and a Chocolate Cherry Upsidedown cake for dessert!

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from spuddog wrote 2 years 9 weeks ago

Went on our Boy Scout winter campout and planned a big meal. 70-80 mph wind gusts (Ward, CO)and sub 0 wind chill shredded the tents and sent us home. We still cooked. In my great grandmother's 16" oven I put 5 rabbits (dredged in olive oil, S&P, garlic and Italian herbs), 3 onions, 6 bell peppers and 2 dzn lg Italian sausage (cut in 1/2). Cooked for about 30 min. We served the sausage in Mexican Bolillo roll (the kind used for tortas) w/ heaps of the trimmings and rabbit on the side. It hit the spot and fed the whole troop and was all the better in a 100 yr old pot and rabbits I got w/ my son and good friend.

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from spuddog wrote 2 years 9 weeks ago

I read back through some of the posts and they got me thinking. The best cast iron skillet meal I've had was venison gyros. My son and his friend helped me get my deer tag so I treated them on the next scout campout. I seasoned 1/4 thick slices of venison w/ Greek seasoning (found at grocery store) and let it sit in the fridge for a few days. Cooked in my cast iron skillet over an open fire in 2 ft of snow just below Guanella Pass. Added the venison to warmed flat bread w/ sliced onions, tomatoes and Tzatziki sauce (purchased at local Greek rest.) We were in heaven. The other guys were drooling as they ate their foil dinners. I've cooked them again but they were never as good or as tender as in that skillet.

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from Hornd wrote 2 years 9 weeks ago

The best thing you can make in a Dutch is a "Bean Hole". I got the recipe straight from LL, but it has also been in F&S. -Precook 2# of beans for 1-1/2 hrs or soak overnight.
-Rinse and set aside
-Layer 1# sliced Salt Pork on bottom of pan
-Layer 1 Lg Sliced Onion on top of Pork
-Put beans on top of onions
-Add 2-1/2 Cups Molasses, 4 tsp pepper, 4 tsp Colemans Dried Mustard
-Cover beans with water
Traditional method is to make hardwood fire and bury with coals on top and bottom and unearth at end of day.
*If cooking at home add a shot of hickory liquid smoke and cook at 325 for 4-6 hrs till beans are soft.
*Good time to cook foil wrapped potatoes and squash or bake a pie while oven is hot.
These beans truly eat like a meal and are great for your digestive track.

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from Hornd wrote 2 years 9 weeks ago

The best thing you can make in a Dutch is a "Bean Hole". I got the recipe straight from LL, but it has also been in F&S.
-Precook 2# of beans for 1-1/2 hrs or soak overnight.
-Rinse and set aside
-Layer 1# sliced Salt Pork on bottom of pan
-Layer 1 Lg Sliced Onion on top of Pork
-Put beans on top of onions
-Add 2-1/2 Cups Molasses, 4 tsp pepper, 4 tsp Colemans Dried Mustard
-Cover beans with water
Traditional method is to make hardwood fire and bury with coals on top and bottom and unearth at end of day.
*If cooking at home add a shot of hickory liquid smoke and cook at 325 for 4-6 hrs till beans are soft.
*Good time to cook foil wrapped potatoes and squash or bake a pie while oven is hot.
These beans truly eat like a meal and are great for your digestive track.
*Freeze for later in Sour Cream or Cottage Cheese containers labeled with contents and date

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from Knife Freak wrote 2 years 6 days ago

My best dutch oven meal was on a Boy Scout campout here in Oklahoma. Our Scout Master was tired of our crappy cooking so he made all the patrols had to make every meal with a dutch oven and compete. so what we made for breakfast was a massive omelot I mean this thing was loaded it had everything you could believe it might of been that we were hungry and camping but that was one of the best meals I have ever had.

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from Knife Freak wrote 2 years 6 days ago

My best dutch oven meal was on a Boy Scout campout here in Oklahoma. Our Scout Master was tired of our crappy cooking so he made all the patrols had to make every meal with a dutch oven and compete. so what we made for breakfast was a massive omelot I mean this thing was loaded it had everything you could believe it might of been that we were hungry and camping but that was one of the best meals I have ever had.

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from Knife Freak wrote 2 years 6 days ago

My best expierience with a ddutch oven was on a Boy Scout campout. Our Scout master made us use dutch ovens and my patrol made really a big omelot that my whole patrol ate off. This thing hade everything on there it was awesome and probably one of the best meals i have ever had.

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from Knife Freak wrote 2 years 6 days ago

Sorry i did not mean to upload so many my computer was freaking out. I Apologize.

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from jbird wrote 2 years 10 weeks ago

Wow, what a day!

My Dutch oven story isn't quite as good. A good buddy and I had went on several turkey&trout trips every spring. Hunting on state ground, camping and trout fishing in the afternoons (can only hunt till 1pm in MO). After 4 years of striking out on birds on public lands, I called in a big ol' 24# tom that morning. When I got back to camp, my buddy had struck out again that morning and quit early. I could smell breakfast cooking as I strolled in triumphantly with my bird. Nothing exotic, Dutch oven biscuits, sausage gravy and fried taters. Breakfast never tasted so good.

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from Anthony Nicolazzo wrote 2 years 10 weeks ago

My dutch over story is from going on a hunting trip in New Hampshire with my father and some other relatives. We shot a few rabbit one day, and sticking to our Italian roots, we quartered the rabbit and sauted him up, then made a tomato sauce right over him and simmered him for a while.

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from basspro1st wrote 2 years 9 weeks ago

While living in Alaska in 1968 as a youth we were returning from our annual month of camping and hunting in the Rainbow Mountains. During the time we spent in the mountains the rains had been pummeling the areas north towards Fairbanks while we enjoyed fabulous weather. Hunting and fishing was good as we caught salmon while my Dad and his buddy Ron hunted sheep and bear. Ron scored a nice ram and Dad had bagged a black bear.

As we traveled back to Eielson AFB the rains had swollen many of the rivers and had washed out part of the Salcha River bridge. We found a campground not far from there and setup our campsite in the pouring rain and dark.

By morning the sky had cleared up a bit and we inspected the campground. Many other travelers were caught in the flooding and could not get back home. Most were unprepared and had very little food or staples. Having some fresh meat but no or little additional foods we all pulled together at the campsite and inventoried our goods. Across the lake was an Army National Guard training facility and my Dad and brother canoed across and picked up everything they could spare us.

After peeling potatoes, carrots, onions and other veggies we put as much as possible in several large dutch ovens we had and proceeded to have the most incredible meal that was shared among 20-30 stranded travelers. For the next 3 days until the road was passable we had several of these wild game stews and made some life-long friends.

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from Dan Dreelin wrote 2 years 9 weeks ago

One of the Best DO meals I made was on a January Trip at a Hunt club in West Virginia. I had Marinated some Venison in Burgundy and modified a Beef Burgundy Recipe and Slow cooked for about three hours. It just melted in your mouth. It was a full 14" Deep DO. Served it up with DO Biscuits and a Caramel Apple Cobbler. There wasn't a drop of food left. Great meal for a Chilly evening.

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from jvidrine wrote 2 years 10 weeks ago

One of my most memorable dutch oven meals was when a few buddies of mine went to North Texas on a deer/duck hunt. We're all from South Louisiana and the high that week was in the 'teens with big wind gusts throughout the day. After breaking ice on the ponds for the ducks to land and hunting that morning we arrived back to the camp. Everyone was very hungry from a long hunt in the cold and I whipped up my famous crawfish tails and green onion scrambled eggs in the dutch oven over the fire. Along with that I made homemade buscuits, also in the dutch over. That gave everyone the burst of entergy to make an afternoon deer hunt. No one was successful that evening, yet no one complained when returning to the camp to see my dad cooking a venison chili over the fire, once again in the dutch over. It was a great weekend with great friends.

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from Jeric Wheeler wrote 2 years 10 weeks ago

peach and apircot cobbler, in same oven, was so good I think i will make it tomorrow here at the house

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from WyDave wrote 2 years 10 weeks ago

Before camped at Jenny Lake in Grand Teton this past summer, I peeled, sliced and seasoned apples with sugar, cinnamon, allspice, nutmeg and butter, and froze the result in a plastic bag, which went wayyyy down in the bottom of the cooler. Then one evening when my wife was at a ranger-led talk, I put the filling in the camp oven inside of a store bought pie crust and baked it over the coals. The result was truly tasty, both as dessert and with bacon and eggs the next morning.

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from Scott Alexander wrote 2 years 10 weeks ago

My grandfather took me camping and fishing as I finished my Webelos and was about to start Boy Scouts. I woke up every morning to bacon and eggs being cooked in a cast iron skillet over a firewhile biscuits cooked in the dutch oven.

Now, twenty years later, my grandfather has passed, but I cooked for my daughters, who are about to turn four, this very same, simple breakfast as my wife and I took them on their very first camping trip.

It's not a gourmet breakfast, but it's a breakfast that I never forgot growing up, nor will I ever forget as they grow up.

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from mtndew824 wrote 2 years 10 weeks ago

Shepherds pie, with ground venison on the bottom covered in fresh veggies and venison gravy and topped off with mash potatoes.Let it simmer for a while and dish it out!!

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from Tim Grieger wrote 2 years 10 weeks ago

I bought my Dutch Oven for camping trips but mostly for use with our Cub Scout Den, (I am our Dens Leader) what better way to teach the boys how to both cook a tasty treat and have fun while doing it, just wish I could get another one so we can have the Main course and desert cooking at the same time! Apple BlueBerry Cobbler is always a crowd pleaser in our Den!

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from Tamara Bosman wrote 2 years 10 weeks ago

Mu Dutch Oven came in handy on a smelting trip last year. I made biscuits ahead of time, and put them in a baggie. Then when we were on the shore of Lake Superior smelting, I decided to stop helping with the smelting and make the guys something to eat. They were at this time hungry and getting tired as the morning sun was coming up. I got everything together and put my Dutch Oven right on top of the fire. Well needless to say I had forgotten a spoon to stir and serve. So one of the guys came up with an idea. Hey grab a rounded oblong shaped rock and a piece of driftwood off of the beach. There was some yellow caution tape laying on the beach. He grabbed it and wrapped one end of the rock to the driftwood and we had our spoon. It worked great and we had one heck of a story to tell when we got home. We still have that homemade spoon, it is quite the conversation piece.

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from diplomat019 wrote 2 years 10 weeks ago

Best dutch oven recipe for me was harvesting a doe and taking it back to camp. my buddy and i butchered the deer and built a fire outside. we floured the cubed venison and sauteed it with onions and garlic until it was brown, then added some thyme and parsley and covered it all with red wine. we left it cooking for hours until the wine was almost all gone. then we toasted some italian bread over the fire and and enjoyed the food outside with some beverages. I would like to thank the good Lord for making me Italian

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from Philip Cornett wrote 2 years 10 weeks ago

This wasn't on a camping trip but it was delicous. My church home group had a bonfire at one of the church elders' home. I brought my Lodge oven and some peaches and a white cake mix and made a quick cobbler. Unbenownst to me, the elders' wife had milked the cows that morning and was making ice cream with it. The most delicious vanilla ice cream and cobbler I have ever had, next to wonderful wood fire on a cool October evening.

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from MaxPower wrote 2 years 10 weeks ago

At our hunting camp in Wyoming we aren't allowed to let our horses graze, so we have to haul alfalfa pellets (along with all our food and gear) nine miles in to camp from the trailhead.

Midway through the week my uncle and cousin and I road out to the trailhead for more pellets. After loading 1600 lbs. on 8 mules we rode back in to camp after dark with a full moon. It was so bright I still remember seeing deer clearly at 50 yards away and my uncle's big grey spooking because of a porcupine in the trail.

The cook greeted us with piping hot elk stew (with red potatoes) and biscuits, both straight from 'the dutch'. After 18 miles and 4 hours in the saddle, I was famished.

Dinner always tastes better in the mountains

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from bassman06 wrote 2 years 10 weeks ago

Mine was in scouts too. I was a new scout at a new troop at the time, getting to know people. Now one of our leaders, who looks extremely close, and I mean really close to Mr. Chuck Norris. The campout was almost to an end and he used two dutch ovens. One contained the most amazing homemade, or should I say camp made beef stew I had ever consumed. The other held a delicious cobbler of peaches, cherries and a little dash of a red wine that he brought for the adults. Needless to say, I wish I helped myself to more of that stew... and the cobbler!!!

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from epicfisher wrote 2 years 10 weeks ago

Not quite a dutch oven story, but my friend brings a cast iron waffle maker to our camping trips. Adding in the flavor of the cast iron and the smokey flavor of the fire, I've never tasted better waffles

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from Montanagyrene wrote 2 years 10 weeks ago

One of the faculty at the satellite campus where I work has made some KILLER main dishes for our Christmas Faculty/Staff luncheons including a spicy beef and bean dish. I ate so much I almost got sick, but it was worth it. He's teaching at the main campus this year, so we were out of luck, but I'm SURE my coworkers would LOVE for me to win the oven, and bring back a tradition!!

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from Levi Banks wrote 2 years 10 weeks ago

The best combination of memorable and delicious happened this fall. My two brothers and I had taken my oldest nephew deer hunting. When we got home my wife had made a pot of venison chili over a fire in the backyard. Venison pumpkin chili on a perfect November night. We sat around the fire talking and just having a good time until well past the normal bedtime like I hadn't done with my brothers in a few years. He didn’t get a deer that day, but the next morning he got his first one maybe 150 yards from our campfire.

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from Ace22 wrote 2 years 10 weeks ago

I bought my Dutch oven for 11$ at a sale,it has turned out to be the best old friend at the end of a long day.
When that cover is removed there could be a great stew with doughboys,a fantastic cake ,cinnamon rolls or the best biscuits ever eaten around a camp fire.Dutch ovens go with good friends and family.

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from Cody Las-Vegas wrote 2 years 10 weeks ago

I've actually never had a dutch oven meal. I can tell you that I would love to try more than just hot dogs on sticks at our next campfire. I know I am missing greatness.

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from Bernie wrote 2 years 10 weeks ago

It was NOT my best Dutch oven meal. I bought a Dutch oven in the mid-'70s, went up to a Forest Service campsite between Cheyenne and Laramie, Wyoming. Built an inferno in the recessed fire pit, then placed my Dutch oven, containing chicken pieces, spices and some liquid, onto the fire. When I opened the lid an hour or so later, I had a pile of ashes in the Dutch oven that I could hold in my hand. My wife, who divorced me several years later, was incensed. I did get better at Dutch oven cooking though. Four years ago I gave the Dutch oven to my current wife's niece. Had some good meals in that old Dutch oven, though, after the first fiasco.

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from Jacee wrote 2 years 10 weeks ago

My favorite memory so far was making chicken and dumplings at elk camp. I was 7 months pregnant, and had to work twice as hard getting the coals ready, cutting up the veggies and letting them cook, and browning the meat. I worked for nearly two hours on my feet cooking this meal for the whole camp. It was so delicious, and I have not been able to recreate how good it was... or maybe it was because I was finally able to sit down and relax!

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from Douglas wrote 2 years 10 weeks ago

My best dutch oven meal was had at a Civil War reenactment years ago. A member of our group brought a wild turkey he had picked up recently as fresh road kill. He had dressed out the bird and frozen it. We thawed the bird and took it apart so that it fit into two dutch ovens. All we added were onions, salt, pepper, and a bit of water. That turkey stewed all day over a slow camp fire. We sorted out the bones that evening and fixed a pone of corn bread in a skillet over the fire.
Best turkey dinner I have ever had.

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from sgtsly wrote 2 years 10 weeks ago

On a weekend camping trip to an obscure river landing on the Canoochee River, which winds through the back 40 on Fort Stewart, we put together a kind of Brunswick Stew. Whatever we caught went in a Dutch oven already started with canned tomatoes and corn. Added chopped celery and cubed taters and more than two Dixies. Bream, bass, catfish, and Frank's were added to create a pretty tasty "soup". The time spent together with good friends in the outdoors and the relationships built that trip, last until today.

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from Big Country wrote 2 years 10 weeks ago

When I was young(er) my family would go on Labor Day weekend camping trips every year to a local lake. On Saturday nights my cusin and I were allowed to get the fire pit going around dark. With unreal amounts of charcoal starter fluid we had a camp fire going, our sunburnt arms almost glowing from the added heat of fire. We'd come back to the camp from the shoreline and eat dinner every night but on Saturday nights, our playing in the fire was to be done early. Where a mini bonfire fueled by whatever we could fing in the bushes and lighter fluid had been there was now a glowing pile of charcoal brickets with a dutch oven in the middle of the fire ring. When my Grandpa would take the lid off to check the food the sweet smell of peaches would fill the air, people from other campsites would holler from somewhere how "damn good" that smelled. That dutch oven was full, and I do not misuse the term full, of peack cobbler. We would wait for what seemed like forever until we would see Grandma getting Ice cream (that I can assure you was not there the day before) and cream from the coolers and the frige inside their camper. I can almost taste it as I type this my foam bowl full of warm cream and hot cobbler. That is the food from the dutch oven that I can remember so sharply that I'm going to go to my grandparents hose today and try and get the recipe and see if I can do it in a regular oven.

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from Beekeeper wrote 2 years 10 weeks ago

About 10 years ago on a coastal feral hog hunt. I used my old Dutch oven to make one of the best gumbos I've ever made. A half hour at low tide with a cast net provided fresh white shrimp and 5-6 blue crabs. I also picked up and shucked out oysters from a small shell bar. Back at camp a simple broth was made from the shrimp heads and shells while I was making a nice dark roux. Chopped onion, bell pepper and celery that I had brought were added to the roux along with the broth, I then added the dressed and cracked blue crab. After simmering about 20 minutes the shrimp and oysters were added and 5 minutes later all was served over steaming rice and simply seasoned with salt and pepper.

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from Arlo269 wrote 2 years 10 weeks ago

Fresh Deer Strap Stew. Killed a nice doe a few years back and happened to have my Dutch Oven with me so we through in a few onions, carrots, and potatoes and put her on a slow cook while we finished dressing the doe. We had actually got busy and lost track of time but that happened to be the best thing that could have happened as it was the most tender meat I have ever had in my life. Slow and Low that is the tempo to a good Ducth Oven Cook.

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from 2Poppa wrote 2 years 10 weeks ago

A little over fifty years ago my step-dad Beckham, decided he was going to finally take me hunting. Now mind you, he wasn't just from Kentucky, he was from Appalachia, Kentucky, and knew a lot about hunting, farming, canning and moonshine.

We were camping out and going squirrel hunting and took along all of the necessities for a successful hunt. I got to carry the .22 rifle while Beckham carried an over and under shotgun. Midmorning, just before we left he dug a hole and started a fire. He mentioned something about, "it should be 'bout right when we get back."

He placed me under a large oak tree and told me to keep the tree in my sight at all times, as he was going to go further into the woods. As soon as he left I heard the report of his shotgun. A few moments later he shot again.

He silently walked back towards me and held two fingers up and motioned for me to stay put. About an hour goes by, when I noticed my step-dad moving through the tall oaks towards me.

He walked up to me and said,"it was time to get me a couple." We walked down into "hollers" and back up several ridges when I realized he had a destination in mind. We sat below a tall white oak and could hear the barking of squirrels.

He pointed one out to me as I took aim with the .22 rifle. The big red fell about thirty feet to the soft leaved floor. As we sat there we noticed an "ol' feller" walking up out of the "holler" to us; the squirrel that hit the ground still had his tail twitching.

The "ol' feller" yelled out, "Beck" ... as if he was asking a question. My step-dad yelled back, "it is he." We followed the older man down into the hollow and I was puzzled at the contraption, that was on the ground in front of my very young, eight year old eyes.

It was a moonshine still! I didn't comprehend everything that just had transpired that morning and afternoon, but someone had some well laid plans. We visited for a couple of hours when my step-dad told the "ol' feller" he wanted to get back to camp before dark.

By now I could eat a bear, but I didn't dare speak those words, as I was afraid my hillbilly step-dad might just agree. The .22 rifle I was carrying began to get heavier at we topped the last ridge. I thought I might see burning embers from the campfire my step-dad started, but the woods were dark except for the top of the trees where the moon was beginning to glow on them.

I was excited to get back to camp,as it felt like home, being so deep in these dark woods. My dad began to use a stick and dugged around the campfire he had started earlier in the day. Burning embers could be seen along with some sort of a pot. It was a "Dutch Oven", he said. I asked what was in it, just as he spoke the words, "Kentucky Burgoo."

He pulled the Dutch Oven out of the fire along with a cast iron skillet with a lid. When the lids came off, the aroma wafting in the night air made my stomach growl.
He had placed, mutton, two good size squirrels and a chicken along with onions, celery, potatoes, tomatoes and corn. What didn't he put in it was probably a better question? Did I mention cornpone?

I found out later the "two good size squirrels" was actually a ground hog! I couldn't tell the difference. I've tried to duplicate and replicate that recipe, but somehow I can't. Perhaps I never will and it's probably a lot better that way, as the memory still has life as it lives on in all of my five senses.

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from TM wrote 2 years 10 weeks ago

The single best meal ever cooked in cast iron (or in any other material for that matter) is the Ontario shore lunch. There are variations, but the standard is the same. Spend the morning catching bronzebacks, walleye, or perch. Find a secluded rocky area of shore. Start a small campfire and let it burn to embers (use this time to cool some beer in the lake). Fry thick cut bacon in cast iron over the embers. Note bacon is pork's highest calling, and campfire fried bacon is bacon's highest calling. When it is done frying, remove the bacon and save the rendered fat. Peel one potato per person and slice into 1/4 inch slices. Fry in hot bacon fat until the potatoes are crispy on the outside. Season with salt and pepper, remove from the pan. There should be some bacon fat remaining. Fry the fresh fish (bone in, not filets) in the remaining fat, just until cooked through. Retrieve your beer from the lake.

There you have the best meal one could possibly hope for. All in one skillet. Bacon, bacon flavored potatoes, and fresh fish over a smokey campfire, with cold beer. There is no better meal on the planet.

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from mdsulli2 wrote 2 years 9 weeks ago

My best D.O. story is from this year. Jeremy a guy I work with goes on vacation, hunting with a few friends the week before rifle season. They set up tents in northern Missouri for what they say is the best week to bow hunt. Jeremy asked if I wanted to go and I gladly accepted, in September. The first Saturday evening I got back to camp not expecting anyone to have shot a deer because the wind was fast and swirling where I set up. To my suprise they where heading back out to drag in a guys first deer with a bow. I started the coals and put together a peach cobbler. Two large cans of peaches and yellow cake mix. I brought the eggs, butter and milk alredy mixed. I added that to the mix and poured it over the peaches. I spaced the coals out, top and bottom. I put foil packets with chicken and veggies on the grill maybe fifteen minuts later I looked back at the D.O. and the coals on top where almost spent. The wind was blowing non stop causing the coals to burn out quick. I added the same amount of coals to the top again but was worried the cobbler would burn. After dinner we opened it up and it was golden brown. That hot desert on that cold windy night was just what we needed before hitting the sleeping bags. My wife thought camping in a tent with highs in the 40s and 20 mile an hour winds was insane but I'll be back next year!

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from Tom-Tom wrote 2 years 9 weeks ago

We were camped on a small island in Arkansas where the Buffalo flows into the White River. Before setting out for that last morning, we put the last of the burger, sausage and beans and bacon in the dutch oven along with chopped onion and any other available spices a put some V8 juice on top and then set it in the coals. When we got back the temperature had dropped into the low 40's and a storm was brewing. We broke camp and packed the boat for the short trip to the public landing before we lifted the lid, gave it a stir and then dipped our cups into the mixture. We slurped it down and kept at it until everything was gone. As the rain started to fall, someone said that he was glad his wife wasn't along because she sure wouldn't appreciate all the fun we were having.

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from TexAg wrote 2 years 9 weeks ago

I haven't ever had a dutch oven meal because I've never owned one, but I won one then that would be a different story...

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from rserpa wrote 2 years 9 weeks ago

We were camping and steelhead fishing on the Mosquitoe River in the UP of Michigan years ago. My buddy wanted to cook a turkey in his new dutch oven by burying the DO in a pit with hot stones. Being new to DO cooking he added some extra water to be sure the bird didn't dry out. Needless to say there was too much moisture and every time the DO burbed to release some steam it sucked in some sand. Regardless, the best turkey we ever had even if it was a little gritty.

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from John Vogel wrote 2 years 9 weeks ago

Myself and a friend were bow hunting elk in Montana and kept missing our chances at hitting one until our last day when finally a bull stepped out a bit to far. We butchered it in camp and started the kitchen prep. I had planned to make a Daube stew with the elk so I hauled my le creuset dutch oven and the ingredients. the wine and cognac were put in water bottles and i had to leave the bacon behind. still the best meal ever eaten in camp.

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from Proverbs wrote 2 years 9 weeks ago

My favorite Dutch oven meal was shore lunch in northern Ontario some 20 years ago. After a morning of catching walleye and perch, we boated back to camp where the guide's helper made short work of sending the filets into kettles of boiling oil. The aroma was wonderful, but was eclipsed when the helper revealed three Dutch ovens by scraping the coals off the lids and opening them. One had biscuits blossoming out the top. The second held an ambrosic mixture of potatoes, cheese and onions. The third was bubbling with Alberta peach cobbler. I was Dutch-hooked immediately.

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from Baccon wrote 2 years 9 weeks ago

Years ago I worked for the Boy Scouts of the Concho Valley in TX. During my time with them I ran the summer camp. My favorite thing to do was walk through the campsites every night and test the deserts made by the troops. It became a joke because I kept a fork in my shirt pocket. I tried to explain that I was just checking on everyone, but it was no secret that I had my own agenda. Favorite was Black Forest Cobbler!!!

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from Ken48 wrote 2 years 9 weeks ago

My favorite Dutch Oven story comes from a two day flea market and camping overnight with our son, daughter and her family. I headed back to camp early to start the pinapple/blueberry cobbler and the homemade icecream. They all showed up toting a 50lb bag of potatoes and one of onions on the 4-wheeler. We set my daughter's 16" cast iron skillet over the LP burner and started frying potatoes and onions in butter. We were all grabbing those crispy fried potatoes and onions as fast they cooked while the smell of bubbling pineapple and blueberries filled the air. Never did get the burgers cooked, but we all still talk about that wonderful meal.

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from Coleman Cain wrote 2 years 9 weeks ago

My "best" DO story also comes from Scouting. A few years ago, I became Scoutmaster for our local Scout Troop. The former Scoutmaster had a bunch of of the troop's equipment in her garage and while loading it up in my car to take to our storage area, I found 3 old, rusty lodge DO's. Well, I put them with our other gear and didn't think any more about them. A couple of months later, I came across an article on the web about DO cooking and how great it was, so I started researching - how to use DO's, how to clean them, recipes - the works!

The next Tuesday, I took the one I thought was in the best shape home and got out the wire brush and started scrubbing the rust off of that DO and kept at it for a couple of days until all the rust was gone and the DO was practically silver! Then, I wiped it down with veg. oil and put in the oven at the highest temp and started reseasoning it. Well, the DO started to smoke and stink and my wife was ready to throw me and my oven out of the house!

Luckily, she didn't and I got the DO well seasoned and took it on our next campout and tried a simple dump cake. It didn't work - I baked a hockey puck (which by the way is exactly what my Scouts used it for).

Anyway, I learned from my mistake and started making everything in the DO. Now, that's all I do. I even steal slow cooker recipes from my wife's good housekeeping magazines and try them out in the field.

Last week I made Spiced Chocolate Bread Pudding for dessert for my assistant scoutmasters and have to say that was my best dessert yet!

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from joejv4 wrote 2 years 9 weeks ago

Campfire pie - really simple and we used to make it with apple pie filling, but cherry, pumpkin or whatever else you may choose works.

This is one for camping where there is no stove or over and requires a good old cast iron dutch oven.

Ingredients are ones that can be packed in (but the canned filling will add a bit of weight.)

Bisquick and water to make a dough similar in consistency to pizza dough - and there's a reason for this. for the crust, since we're roughing it, we toss the dough like pizza then line the bottom and sides of the dutch oven with one crust, fill with our favorite pie filling, toss another crust for the top. Cover the dutch oven and place on a bed of coals, and add coals to the top of the lid and let cook for around 15 minutes.

A great desert for around the camp fire!

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from Frederick Willi... wrote 2 years 9 weeks ago

We were camping in Yosemite for a week with 4 other families. It was "Rib Night" but we were all tired from a hike earlier in the day and no one was in the mood to 'Babysit' ribs ove the coals, so I suggested throwing them in a Dutch Oven. We had Beef Ribs, Pork spare ribs and baby backs cut up, seasoned and stuffed in a Dutch Oven. A second Dutch oven cooked Cheesy Corn Bread with jalapinos. Once the ribs cooked down and started falling off the bone, we siphoned off the grease, poured in some BBQ sauce, gave them another 30min on the fire then had the BEST Ribs & Corn Bread EVER!
Lining the Ovens with Heave Duty aluminum foil allowed for a quick clean-up and a Chocolate Cherry Upsidedown cake for dessert!

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from spuddog wrote 2 years 9 weeks ago

Went on our Boy Scout winter campout and planned a big meal. 70-80 mph wind gusts (Ward, CO)and sub 0 wind chill shredded the tents and sent us home. We still cooked. In my great grandmother's 16" oven I put 5 rabbits (dredged in olive oil, S&P, garlic and Italian herbs), 3 onions, 6 bell peppers and 2 dzn lg Italian sausage (cut in 1/2). Cooked for about 30 min. We served the sausage in Mexican Bolillo roll (the kind used for tortas) w/ heaps of the trimmings and rabbit on the side. It hit the spot and fed the whole troop and was all the better in a 100 yr old pot and rabbits I got w/ my son and good friend.

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from spuddog wrote 2 years 9 weeks ago

I read back through some of the posts and they got me thinking. The best cast iron skillet meal I've had was venison gyros. My son and his friend helped me get my deer tag so I treated them on the next scout campout. I seasoned 1/4 thick slices of venison w/ Greek seasoning (found at grocery store) and let it sit in the fridge for a few days. Cooked in my cast iron skillet over an open fire in 2 ft of snow just below Guanella Pass. Added the venison to warmed flat bread w/ sliced onions, tomatoes and Tzatziki sauce (purchased at local Greek rest.) We were in heaven. The other guys were drooling as they ate their foil dinners. I've cooked them again but they were never as good or as tender as in that skillet.

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from Hornd wrote 2 years 9 weeks ago

The best thing you can make in a Dutch is a "Bean Hole". I got the recipe straight from LL, but it has also been in F&S. -Precook 2# of beans for 1-1/2 hrs or soak overnight.
-Rinse and set aside
-Layer 1# sliced Salt Pork on bottom of pan
-Layer 1 Lg Sliced Onion on top of Pork
-Put beans on top of onions
-Add 2-1/2 Cups Molasses, 4 tsp pepper, 4 tsp Colemans Dried Mustard
-Cover beans with water
Traditional method is to make hardwood fire and bury with coals on top and bottom and unearth at end of day.
*If cooking at home add a shot of hickory liquid smoke and cook at 325 for 4-6 hrs till beans are soft.
*Good time to cook foil wrapped potatoes and squash or bake a pie while oven is hot.
These beans truly eat like a meal and are great for your digestive track.

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from Hornd wrote 2 years 9 weeks ago

The best thing you can make in a Dutch is a "Bean Hole". I got the recipe straight from LL, but it has also been in F&S.
-Precook 2# of beans for 1-1/2 hrs or soak overnight.
-Rinse and set aside
-Layer 1# sliced Salt Pork on bottom of pan
-Layer 1 Lg Sliced Onion on top of Pork
-Put beans on top of onions
-Add 2-1/2 Cups Molasses, 4 tsp pepper, 4 tsp Colemans Dried Mustard
-Cover beans with water
Traditional method is to make hardwood fire and bury with coals on top and bottom and unearth at end of day.
*If cooking at home add a shot of hickory liquid smoke and cook at 325 for 4-6 hrs till beans are soft.
*Good time to cook foil wrapped potatoes and squash or bake a pie while oven is hot.
These beans truly eat like a meal and are great for your digestive track.
*Freeze for later in Sour Cream or Cottage Cheese containers labeled with contents and date

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from Knife Freak wrote 2 years 6 days ago

My best dutch oven meal was on a Boy Scout campout here in Oklahoma. Our Scout Master was tired of our crappy cooking so he made all the patrols had to make every meal with a dutch oven and compete. so what we made for breakfast was a massive omelot I mean this thing was loaded it had everything you could believe it might of been that we were hungry and camping but that was one of the best meals I have ever had.

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from Knife Freak wrote 2 years 6 days ago

My best dutch oven meal was on a Boy Scout campout here in Oklahoma. Our Scout Master was tired of our crappy cooking so he made all the patrols had to make every meal with a dutch oven and compete. so what we made for breakfast was a massive omelot I mean this thing was loaded it had everything you could believe it might of been that we were hungry and camping but that was one of the best meals I have ever had.

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from Knife Freak wrote 2 years 6 days ago

My best expierience with a ddutch oven was on a Boy Scout campout. Our Scout master made us use dutch ovens and my patrol made really a big omelot that my whole patrol ate off. This thing hade everything on there it was awesome and probably one of the best meals i have ever had.

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from Knife Freak wrote 2 years 6 days ago

Sorry i did not mean to upload so many my computer was freaking out. I Apologize.

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