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How To Make Snow Goose Sandwiches

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March 12, 2012

How To Make Snow Goose Sandwiches

By David Draper

My post last Monday asking for the best way to cook snow geese got a wide range of responses, from the wise to the wise-ass. Not unexpectedly, the old grill-them-on-a-plank-then-throw-away-the-goose-and-eat-the-plank recipe came up a few times here and on the Field & Stream Facebook page.

That joke was funny the first 754 times I’ve heard it, but now it’s just getting old. And it’s just plain wrong, no matter how it’s told. Of all the comments I got, Trey Osborn’s was the best: “Folks if you don’t like goose. DO NOT GO SHOOT THEM! Let the folks who will eat them shoot them.”

I couldn’t agree more.

Our hunt with Mike Adams and Danny Kahler of Webbed Feet Down Outfitters was pretty typical of spring snow goose hunting, in that half of our group shot six geese the first day and 66 the next. The other guys flip-flopped our success, shooting 44 on day one and 12 on day two.

No matter how many times we pulled the trigger, all of us had a blast, and I’d recommend Mike and his crew to anyone wanting to experience a great day of goose hunting just a few short hours up I-76 from downtown Denver. It’s well worth the trip, if only to watch his darling black Lab, Quinn, work her magic.

Camp Chef’s Steve McGrath and Guy Perkins also helped dispel the myth the snow geese aren’t edible by making up a big batch of snow goose sandwiches.

The birds we shot Monday morning were breasted and quick-marinated in a couple cups of milk, a few tablespoons of lemon juice and a handful of fresh, chopped garlic. We were all starving, so the geese didn’t get to soak long before Guy threw them on the grill for a few minutes, cooking them until they were just medium rare. Sliced thin, they were delicious as finger food.

The grilled breasts that survived the initial barrage of hungry hunters were layered onto a slice of bread, along with a selection of condiments and cheese. Topped with another slice of the bread, the sandwich was toasted between a hot grill and Camp Chef’s cool Bacon Panini Press. I’d challenge any of you naysayers to eat one of these and tell me snow goose doesn’t taste good.

Comments (5)

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from country road wrote 2 years 5 weeks ago

I've never eaten goose of any kind, but that sounds like good groceries to me.

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from Casey Walker wrote 2 years 5 weeks ago

Some buddies and I just took 80 snows last Saturday by sneaking up on them in a field behind cow decoys. Funnest 10 seconds of shooting I have ever experienced. Made a batch of Goose poppers for the grill that afternoon and my family loved them. Simple marinade of Worcestershire, Soy Sauce, Lemmon juice and garlic. Wrap the chunks of breast up in bacon with a piece of Jalapeno pepper and soak in the marinade overnight and grill up the next day till the bacon is cooked. Trust me it will make you want to do your part to save the tundra! LOL

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from NE flatlander wrote 2 years 5 weeks ago

Casey- I just finished building a cow decoy yesterday. Planning on taking it out this weekend and trying it. What time of day did you go after them?

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from jamesti wrote 2 years 5 weeks ago

i have shot and eaten snows for years and never found them to be bad eating. casey gave a great recipe that i am gonna try!

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from Casey Walker wrote 2 years 5 weeks ago

NE flatlander we followed them off the river till they sat down in a field. We just happened to time it up just right on this bunch. They had just landed and were so busy eating they hardly noticed us. Tried another sneak on a bunch that had been in the field for a while but they were more nervous and the Canadians in the field beside them got nervous and took the whole works back to water with them. I think it's best if you can get on them right after they land in the field and are feeding heavy.

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from Casey Walker wrote 2 years 5 weeks ago

Some buddies and I just took 80 snows last Saturday by sneaking up on them in a field behind cow decoys. Funnest 10 seconds of shooting I have ever experienced. Made a batch of Goose poppers for the grill that afternoon and my family loved them. Simple marinade of Worcestershire, Soy Sauce, Lemmon juice and garlic. Wrap the chunks of breast up in bacon with a piece of Jalapeno pepper and soak in the marinade overnight and grill up the next day till the bacon is cooked. Trust me it will make you want to do your part to save the tundra! LOL

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from country road wrote 2 years 5 weeks ago

I've never eaten goose of any kind, but that sounds like good groceries to me.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from NE flatlander wrote 2 years 5 weeks ago

Casey- I just finished building a cow decoy yesterday. Planning on taking it out this weekend and trying it. What time of day did you go after them?

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from jamesti wrote 2 years 5 weeks ago

i have shot and eaten snows for years and never found them to be bad eating. casey gave a great recipe that i am gonna try!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Casey Walker wrote 2 years 5 weeks ago

NE flatlander we followed them off the river till they sat down in a field. We just happened to time it up just right on this bunch. They had just landed and were so busy eating they hardly noticed us. Tried another sneak on a bunch that had been in the field for a while but they were more nervous and the Canadians in the field beside them got nervous and took the whole works back to water with them. I think it's best if you can get on them right after they land in the field and are feeding heavy.

0 Good Comment? | | Report

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