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Ceviche as a Sushi Alternative: The Most Refreshing Way to Eat Your Catch

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July 20, 2012

Ceviche as a Sushi Alternative: The Most Refreshing Way to Eat Your Catch

By Jonathan Miles


Ceviche (seh-VEE-chay) is a South American staple in which chunks of fresh, raw fish are marinated in citrus juices, then tossed with a variety of ingredients into a salsalike mixture that makes for a dazzlingly refreshing lunch. Sushi-phobes, relax: The citric acid firms up the fish so that, while still raw, it tastes and feels cooked.* Best of all, you can prep this the night before your trip: Squeeze the limes and lemons into one zip-seal bag, and put the chopped ingredients into another. All you’ll need to do then is catch the fish.

Ingredients:

-1 lb. saltwater fish fillets, well rinsed
-1 Tbsp. salt
-1⁄2 cup freshly squeezed
-lime juice (from about 6 limes)
-1⁄2 cup freshly squeezed lemon juice
-1 Tbsp. olive oil
-1 medium onion, finely chopped
-4 Tbsp. cilantro, finely chopped
-1 jalapeño, or habanero, minced (optional)

Directions:

Cut the fish into bite-size chunks and place in a container. Salt it, then gently turn the pieces to ensure the salt coats them evenly. Add the lime and lemon juices along with the olive oil. Marinate the fish—covered and either refrigerated or over ice—for at least an hour, or up to 3 or 4 hours. (The longer the marinating, the firmer and more “cooked” the fish will be.) Turn the fish occasionally, or shake the container once in a while, to make sure the marinade is covering all of the fish.

Add the remaining ingredients, and stir gently. Let sit for at least 15 minutes for the flavors to meld. Serve with tortilla chips, popcorn, CornNuts, or whatever salty snacks you like.

Comments (18)

Top Rated
All Comments
from Hunter_Fass wrote 1 year 38 weeks ago

Is there any good freshwater ceviche recipe or is there a reason why it says saltwater fish fillets?

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Koldkut wrote 1 year 38 weeks ago

I've heard that with freshwater fish, you must freeze them really cold for a week before it's considered safe for raw consumption, or ceviche as it would seem. I do the same with trout or salmon before I make gravlax.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Bob81 wrote 1 year 38 weeks ago

I've heard similar recommendations. Freshwater fish are apparently host to a variety of parasites that aren't present in saltwater fish. This is also why its not recommended you use freshwater fish for sushi.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from cTXn wrote 1 year 38 weeks ago

One of the best meals around. I usually add some chopped avacado and tomatos to the recipe above. I was also under the impression that the citric acid technically cooked the meat instead of leaving it still raw.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from mkorpal wrote 1 year 38 weeks ago

Freshwater fish is fine. At least my wife and I haven't died or gotten sick yet and we've been making bluegill & crappie ceviche for the past two years. I would recommend freezing the gills before preparing just to be safe but I've made it fresh before and I'm still above ground. Super delicious with tortilla chips and a cold brew on a summer day!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Knife Freak wrote 1 year 38 weeks ago

Koldkut
What is gravlax?

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Koldkut wrote 1 year 38 weeks ago

It's a cured salmon, similar to sold smoked salmon, but without the smoke. It was featured in a Food Fight Friday back in March, you can google it.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from kansasjeff wrote 1 year 38 weeks ago

Check out Mark Gilchrist on youtube he does a video about Gravad Lax using trout.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Wttp wrote 1 year 38 weeks ago

Try it the Pilipino way:
Kilawin is a Philippine exotic delicacy in which the main ingredient is raw fish or meat marinated in vinegar, pepper, chili (preferably siling labuyo), chopped onions, and garlic and either cooked or served fresh without cooking. Other souring agents like calamansi juice (or lemon) may be used in place of vinegar.
The root word "kilaw" probably comes from the word hilaw, meaning "raw." It is a common dish found in almost every part of the Philippine archipelago. It has been around since at least the 10th century, an excavation revealing remains of cooking ingredients in Butuan City suggests.
The Ilocano version, called kilawen, has the addition of papait (bitter bile juice). In nearby La Union and Pangasinan, there is a version known a "jumping salad" consisting of live shrimps eaten with a sprinkle of calamansi juice.
In the Visayas, it is called kinilaw and the meat, seafood and vegetables in the dish are entirely raw or soured with vinegar or fruit juice. Coconut milk may be used in some recipes.
Among the Tagalogs, a popular main ingredient choice for kilawin is fresh dilis (anchovies).
Different recipes and variations are available in the Net.
Check it out, you might like it.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Knife Freak wrote 1 year 38 weeks ago

I like trying new thing but I sillthink god gave us fire for a reason.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Josh Giannino wrote 1 year 38 weeks ago

I agree with Knife Freak... seems like this dish is a little to "In the kitchen with Bear Grylls" to me

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from hermit crab wrote 1 year 38 weeks ago

Boil the fish pieces quickly then drop the cooked fish into ice water to cool them (as you would for cocktail shrimp). After the cooking/cooling, prepare them the same way as you would otherwise use raw fish. Coconut milk is another great ingredient to use.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Bob81 wrote 1 year 38 weeks ago

cTXn,
I was always under the same impression. I had often heard making ceviche as "cooking with acid". After I read this article I went researching and it turns out that the term cooking refers only to things prepared with heat. Cooking with heat and "cooking with acid" each accomplish a similar thing though in that they denature proteins, or break them down.

Semantics I guess...

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from dukkillr wrote 1 year 38 weeks ago

My girlfriend's dad made this out of some fresh caught tuna. Delicious.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from dcb4640 wrote 1 year 38 weeks ago

Harmful bacteria thrive in freshwater fish, and can not live on saltwater fish (hence why salt is a preservative). That's why it isn't safe to eat freshwater fish raw.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Red Salas wrote 1 year 37 weeks ago

Ceveche is some good stuff. I like avacado in mine.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from LaineDillard22 wrote 1 year 5 weeks ago

can you do this with inshore fish like speckled trout or redfish

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from John Yaggi Omni... wrote 51 weeks 1 day ago

It's great you can prep before you head out into the ocean, but there are a few things left out. Lets say you catch a Dorado (Mahi Mahi) or Snapper. I'm guessing once you have the fish on board you have to bleed and gut the fish first before cutting the fish into pieces. However, once you gut and bleed the fish and filet it, does it matter if you clean it with salt water or drinking water?

0 Good Comment? | | Report

Post a Comment

from Knife Freak wrote 1 year 38 weeks ago

I like trying new thing but I sillthink god gave us fire for a reason.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Hunter_Fass wrote 1 year 38 weeks ago

Is there any good freshwater ceviche recipe or is there a reason why it says saltwater fish fillets?

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Wttp wrote 1 year 38 weeks ago

Try it the Pilipino way:
Kilawin is a Philippine exotic delicacy in which the main ingredient is raw fish or meat marinated in vinegar, pepper, chili (preferably siling labuyo), chopped onions, and garlic and either cooked or served fresh without cooking. Other souring agents like calamansi juice (or lemon) may be used in place of vinegar.
The root word "kilaw" probably comes from the word hilaw, meaning "raw." It is a common dish found in almost every part of the Philippine archipelago. It has been around since at least the 10th century, an excavation revealing remains of cooking ingredients in Butuan City suggests.
The Ilocano version, called kilawen, has the addition of papait (bitter bile juice). In nearby La Union and Pangasinan, there is a version known a "jumping salad" consisting of live shrimps eaten with a sprinkle of calamansi juice.
In the Visayas, it is called kinilaw and the meat, seafood and vegetables in the dish are entirely raw or soured with vinegar or fruit juice. Coconut milk may be used in some recipes.
Among the Tagalogs, a popular main ingredient choice for kilawin is fresh dilis (anchovies).
Different recipes and variations are available in the Net.
Check it out, you might like it.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Koldkut wrote 1 year 38 weeks ago

I've heard that with freshwater fish, you must freeze them really cold for a week before it's considered safe for raw consumption, or ceviche as it would seem. I do the same with trout or salmon before I make gravlax.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Bob81 wrote 1 year 38 weeks ago

I've heard similar recommendations. Freshwater fish are apparently host to a variety of parasites that aren't present in saltwater fish. This is also why its not recommended you use freshwater fish for sushi.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from cTXn wrote 1 year 38 weeks ago

One of the best meals around. I usually add some chopped avacado and tomatos to the recipe above. I was also under the impression that the citric acid technically cooked the meat instead of leaving it still raw.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from mkorpal wrote 1 year 38 weeks ago

Freshwater fish is fine. At least my wife and I haven't died or gotten sick yet and we've been making bluegill & crappie ceviche for the past two years. I would recommend freezing the gills before preparing just to be safe but I've made it fresh before and I'm still above ground. Super delicious with tortilla chips and a cold brew on a summer day!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Knife Freak wrote 1 year 38 weeks ago

Koldkut
What is gravlax?

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Koldkut wrote 1 year 38 weeks ago

It's a cured salmon, similar to sold smoked salmon, but without the smoke. It was featured in a Food Fight Friday back in March, you can google it.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from kansasjeff wrote 1 year 38 weeks ago

Check out Mark Gilchrist on youtube he does a video about Gravad Lax using trout.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Josh Giannino wrote 1 year 38 weeks ago

I agree with Knife Freak... seems like this dish is a little to "In the kitchen with Bear Grylls" to me

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from hermit crab wrote 1 year 38 weeks ago

Boil the fish pieces quickly then drop the cooked fish into ice water to cool them (as you would for cocktail shrimp). After the cooking/cooling, prepare them the same way as you would otherwise use raw fish. Coconut milk is another great ingredient to use.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Bob81 wrote 1 year 38 weeks ago

cTXn,
I was always under the same impression. I had often heard making ceviche as "cooking with acid". After I read this article I went researching and it turns out that the term cooking refers only to things prepared with heat. Cooking with heat and "cooking with acid" each accomplish a similar thing though in that they denature proteins, or break them down.

Semantics I guess...

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from dukkillr wrote 1 year 38 weeks ago

My girlfriend's dad made this out of some fresh caught tuna. Delicious.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from dcb4640 wrote 1 year 38 weeks ago

Harmful bacteria thrive in freshwater fish, and can not live on saltwater fish (hence why salt is a preservative). That's why it isn't safe to eat freshwater fish raw.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Red Salas wrote 1 year 37 weeks ago

Ceveche is some good stuff. I like avacado in mine.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from LaineDillard22 wrote 1 year 5 weeks ago

can you do this with inshore fish like speckled trout or redfish

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from John Yaggi Omni... wrote 51 weeks 1 day ago

It's great you can prep before you head out into the ocean, but there are a few things left out. Lets say you catch a Dorado (Mahi Mahi) or Snapper. I'm guessing once you have the fish on board you have to bleed and gut the fish first before cutting the fish into pieces. However, once you gut and bleed the fish and filet it, does it matter if you clean it with salt water or drinking water?

0 Good Comment? | | Report

Post a Comment